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Discussion Starter #1
I've just been doing a bit of reading and found conflicting information (as always) on a few things regarding raw food.

When feeding raw, it seems there's the potential for toxoplasmosis to infect your cat, however I've read that if the meat is frozen for 24-48 hours beforehand, this kills off the bacteria. Is this true? And is normal household freezer temperature cold enough, or does it need to be a little colder?

Toxoplamosis in general seems from my view at least to be made into more of a big deal than it actually is. Infection is unlikely, and apart from if you're pregnant, it does little to you. Given that I grew up with indoor/outdoor cats I assume that I've most likely already been exposed to it. I'm interested because my pregnant friend was bitten by an outdoor cat that attacked her dog recently. Can it even be transmitted through biting? I thought it was really only through faeces.

In any case, it seems that given all the factors, an indoor cat that is fed previously frozen raw food, stands pretty much no chance of being infected. Does that seem right? Does it have a time limit? Say if my imaginary cat was infected today, would he be toxo free in 3 weeks? Or since they're a primary host, does it stay in their system, or would they need to be re-infected. Is it the same for humans, does it stay with us and we just have the immunity to suppress it, but symptoms can reappear later on, or do you have to become infected again?

I'm not really concerned about toxo at all, didn't even know it was a thing when I was younger, I just wanted to get a better understanding of it since I realised I knew next to nothing about it when my friend mentioned it the other day.
 

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I've only seen one study claiming that toxoplasmosis is not transmitted through bites and it was a poorly done study with a sample size of less than 100 that drew ridiculous conclusions- basically it would have been ripped apart by even my worst university prof.

Other sources say you toxoplasmosis can be transmitted by bite though it is not the most common way. This doesn't surprise me because Salmonella works the same way as it can also be transmitted through bites and scratches although it is more likely to be transmitted through contact with fecal matter (and of course meat).

I don't know about toxo staying in cats but it does stay in humans and can be latent for years until the immune system is weakened. This site explains it all very well. Be sure to read the "Treatment" section as that can be useful for your friend.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for that, I read quite a few other sites, but didn't see that one. So transmissible through bites, just not as likely :) My friend did get herself tested and apparently that was all clear.
 

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Azerane,

I think it's very rare to get it through bites. That's more of a rabies thing.

Seems like toxo is more likely spread to humans via oral-fecal method (gross, I know) because the organism thrives in the host's GI tract before it spreads into the bloodstream. It's also cats that venture outside who are more likely to get toxo too, and if you have a healthy cat that happens to get toxo, I suspect he/she will be infected for life, but there will not be any symptoms until the cat is stressed and or is immunocompromised that symptoms begin to show, so cats with FIV or FeLV would be more likely to suffer from it than a healthy cat. Just my "guestimation" through reading, though. I'm no animal medical expert, lol. ;)
 
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