Cat Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my rescues had an unknown URI when I took a group of four in and I took her to the vet along with another stray kitten that started sneezing. The vet prescribed amoxicillian. Of course it spread to my permenant kitties. After treating five cats with the antibiotics, most recovered to just sneezies. I had two kittens quarantined to my bathroom at the time. They were born in the wild from a stray cat dropped where my mother lived and I had been working to tame them as they were feral. The boy had a runny eye which was cleared up with terramycin when I got him. They caught the URI last after I had put the other cats through the amoxicillan. The boy's eyes started weeping so I took him and his sister to the vet to get more amoxicillian. The vet prescribed gentamicin sulfate for his eyes. I've been giving them their meds religiously per instructions. However, little boy's eyes have seemed to get way worse! One is very swollen and he sits with his head tilted back. His eyes are shut at all times and leaking clear fluids. I read online that gentamicin sulfate can cause swelling in the eyes and was wondering if anyone else had any experience with this? I will definitely give the vet a call in the morning, but was looking for any additional information that might be helpful. I don't want this boy to go blind. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Welcome! Sorry I don't have the answers you are looking for. Perhaps try posting this over in the health section as well. Hopefully someone will have suggestions for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,069 Posts
The more common feline URI's are viral, so antibiotics aren't going to do anything for them, anyway (other than hopefully prevent secondary bacterial infections from occurring while the cat's immune systems are busy fighting the virus). Herpesvirus - probably the most common of all feline URI's - can affect both the respiratory system and the eyes, which apparently is what's happening in your household right now. Herpes flare-ups are often triggered by stress and/or through contact with a feline with an active herpes infection - again both of which seem to be happening in your household right now.

If I were you, I'd separate the unfamiliar felines from each other to minimize stress, and I'd stop administering the gentamicin to the kitten until after you've spoken with the vet. The fact that his eyes are worsening may indicate that he's having a bad reaction to that particular medication.

If herpes is the virus that's running through your house, it'd be helpful to start giving all of your felines L-lysine daily. L-lysine is an amino acid that you can pick up in the vitamin section of any pharmacy or discount retailer like Walmart, K-Mart, etc. Buy 500 mg tablets. Crush one tablet for each adult cat and 1/2 tablet for each kitten and mix it into each feline's canned food meal once daily until everyone's respiratory and eye symptoms are gone. L-lysine inhibits the herpesvirus's ability to replicate, making it easier for the animal's immune system to fight off the active infection. Even if your felines don't have herpes, it wouldn't hurt to give L-lysine.

Herpes can not be cured, and almost all cats (more than 95%) are infected with it. Most felines live with it in remission most of the time. As I already mentioned, herpes typically flares up when a feline is under stress, is immuno-compromised, or comes into contact with a feline with an active herpes infection. The best ways to avoid flare-ups are to minimize stress, feed a healthy diet, keep cats as healthy overall as possible, and separate cats with active infections until the flare-up has gone into remission.

Laurie
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top