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Discussion Starter #1
My kitties are definitely not going beyond the screen enclosure.

http://www.stingshield.com/news.htm

TREE TRIMMER, BACK AFTER BEE STINGS, KNOCKS DOWN POWER POLE IN SAFETY HARBOR

SAFETY HARBOR, FL - The Africanized honeybees swarmed the tree trimmer's head and within seconds, his whole body.
"They were inside my ears, my mouth, my nose - everywhere," Ralph St. Peter said Monday, two days after the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office said he was stung as many as 150 times. "They had to cut my clothes off. My whole body was encased in bees."

Africanized bee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The chief difference between the European races or subspecies of bees kept by American beekeepers and the African stock is attributable to selective breeding. The most common race used in North America today is the Italian bee, Apis mellifera ligustica, which has been used for several thousand years in some parts of the world and in the Americas since the arrival of the early European colonists. Beekeepers have tended to eliminate the fierce strains, and the entire race of bees has thus been gentled by selective breeding. Much like the European criminal.

In central and southern Africa, bees have had to defend themselves against other aggressive insects, as well as honey badgers, an animal that also will destroy hives if the bees are not sufficiently defensive. In addition, there was formerly no tradition of beekeeping, only bee robbing. When one wanted honey, one would seek out a bee tree and kill the colony, or at least steal its honey. The colony most likely to survive either animal or human attacks was the fiercest one. These hardy bees had to adapt to the hostile environment of sub-saharan Africa—surviving prolonged droughts and fighting for nectar. Thus the African bee has been naturally selected for ferocity.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Did you kow you can make a wood powered flame thrower?

Its Green, its natural
 

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Yes, we do. There's something wrong with our honey bees, but we don't want them to kill us. :(

As for the analogy, I would not give you an A for that, O. S. It's too far removed from the problem. And the problem is not a joking matter.
 

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hey I think the analogy is perfect. zombies are to us as africanized bees are to honey bees.

and I am not kidding. why not just flamethrower them? I mean when you know there is an infestation why not just burn the tree down? I'm sure the flames would lick up any escapees
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Okay, who changed my Wikipaedia entry?

 

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I understood your reference, O-S. Sometimes burning them out isn't an option because of the fire itself being too easy to get out-of-control. We certainly are having a problem with our bees and they are very important to our agriculture and native flora.
I wish we could find a solution.
I recently watched a story about a man who was attacked and they showed film footage of him at the hospital, he was horribly swelled and had stingers over almost every square inch of him. Staff commented about the number of stingers they pulled out of him. He was very lucky to have survived. I've been stung twice and while it didn't hurt as badly as the wasp sting, it swelled much bigger and bothered me (pain and swelling -wise) much longer. I couldn't imagine enduring mass-multiple stings.
 
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