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Discussion Starter #1
So I've been feeding my cats franken prey for a while now, and I'm hoping to get some info on grinders. Whenever I finish cutting up a chicken/turkey/duck carcass I can't help cringing at how much bone ends up just going to waste. There's even meat left on the thing after I'm done, no matter how hard I try to get as much as possible. It feels like throwing money away when I toss the carcasses, so now I'm wondering if it would be possible to grind them up as bone-in meals, while still feeding franken prey the rest of the time.

At the moment my cats primarily eat quail bones (the younger can occasionally be coaxed into eating chicken wing tips/smashed up chicken necks, but the older just spits that stuff out). I'm hoping what I want to do is possible, and that I can cut back on the quail and save myself some money if I invest in a grinder. I'd keep the quail in their diet, for variety and because I don't want my younger cat to decide she can't chew bones. But at $5 per lb quail is a pretty expensive bone source...

Anyway, to the people on here that grind their cat's food: what grinders do you use? Would a grinder be able to handle all the bones in a chicken/turkey/duck/rabbit carcass? How finely will a grinder grind large bones like thigh bones, drumsticks, or turkey/chicken backs?

Thanks for your help :)
 

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I would like to know too.
My main priorities are a grinder that can do bone decently (without breaking or wearing out too quick), but also not too expensive.

So far I haven't really researched it, but I guess I should. There is one site about how to make home-made ground, that talks about grinders in it... but they're all over $80 (and it mentions that the really good type isn't even manufactured anymore)
Making Cat Food by Lisa A. Pierson, DVM :: homemade cat food, cat food recipes
 

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My cats eat all of the chicken bone except the leg and hip bones. My cats eat the back, the breast, the thigh and the wings. Shouldn't rabbit bone be soft enough for the cats to eat most of the bone matter? Just wondering...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My cats eat all of the chicken bone except the leg and hip bones. My cats eat the back, the breast, the thigh and the wings. Shouldn't rabbit bone be soft enough for the cats to eat most of the bone matter? Just wondering...
I'm really impressed by any cat that can manage chicken necks, much less chicken backs. Mine definitely can't. Maybe someday down the road when their jaws are a lot stronger. Until then I'm considering the grinder to save me some money, and hopefully make things a bit easier on me and on them.

I would like to know too.
My main priorities are a grinder that can do bone decently (without breaking or wearing out too quick), but also not too expensive.

So far I haven't really researched it, but I guess I should. There is one site about how to make home-made ground, that talks about grinders in it... but they're all over $80 (and it mentions that the really good type isn't even manufactured anymore)
Making Cat Food by Lisa A. Pierson, DVM :: homemade cat food, cat food recipes
Oh thanks for the link! I hadn't thought to check back there, but I remember that article when I was first doing my research into raw. I've been doing some more research today, and I keep hearing good things about the Tasin TS-108 electric grinder. I had definitely forgotten that model was recommended on that site. Has anyone on here personally used a Tasin TS-108? I'd be willing to pay $150 for a good grinder, but I agree - I definitely want something that will last.
 

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I just sent that link to my step-dad before x-mas, he was looking to buy a grinder for processing his venison. He actually compared some others he was looking to buy, to the Tasin TS-108, and ended up going with the Tasin. He said the wattage was what did it for him, the Tasin is stronger, and more worth the price when compared to others in the same price range. When I talked to him at X-mas, he said he was extremely pleased with it, it works great, though he doesn't grind bone. His only negative about it was that it is quite loud, but he said it is a nice powerful grinder, and well worth the price.
 

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I'm really impressed by any cat that can manage chicken necks, much less chicken backs. Mine definitely can't. Maybe someday down the road when their jaws are a lot stronger. Until then I'm considering the grinder to save me some money, and hopefully make things a bit easier on me and on them.
I should mention that I split the back into thirds and two of my cats are younger (2 and 1.5 years). Of the two, one is semi-feral (we're socializing her-been with us since October and around humans since August) and she used to catch her own food. She can goble a neck down within a minute or two. A portion of the back takes some good gnawing, but she can eat it. My other younger cat can tackle wings, thighs and necks. She even tries to eat smaller pork bones (key word: "tries")! My older cat (9 years) gets a calcium supplement since she refuses to eat bone unless it's chopped up neck. Forget about grinding. My cats refused anything minced, let alone, ground.

Yeah, I was just wondering about the grinder. You make a good point. Hopefully, your cats will be able to manage bigger bones later on. I think it's a great idea! Hopefully you can find a great one that will do the job for you! Good luck!
 
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