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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought an Andis agc2 professional 2 speed clipper.
It comes with a #10 "blade" .
This is for Buster, an overweight long haired 22 pound cat with a mat problem.
I was thinking about getting a # 5 skiptooth blade that leaves Buster with 1/4 inch long hair.
Never done this kind of thing before, so does anybody have any ideas?:smile:
 

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Yup.

Don't do it yourself. Leave it to the professionals.

I've read too many "emergency room trip" posts about first time grooming/matt removal experiences.
 

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I've gt a set of Oster Professional that I used on Samantha to trim a potty patch, demat her and thin out the belly fur.
Worked fine until my ex and I split up, just no way a non pro cat groom a cat without someone to hold kitty.
 

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I would suggest taking it very easy, a little at a time. I don't know anything about the blades, sorry, but I would suggest trying it out with the supplied blade before buying a differrent blade, that's if you're determined to try it yourself. Quarter inch length seems awful close to the skin to me, for someone who has never done this sort of thing before

I tackled Missy's problem with a pair of shears cutting across the hair and leaving about half the length of the matt. Then putting my fingers under the matt, I brushed it out with a wire brush. It was a two/three week job doing a bit each day. She was very concerned as to what I was doing and tried to watch, which made her a bunch of wriggles. She gets a daily brush and comb now and the matts, that constantly try to re-establish themselves, are under control.
 

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I just bought an Andis agc2 professional 2 speed clipper.
It comes with a #10 "blade" .
This is for Buster, an overweight long haired 22 pound cat with a mat problem.
I was thinking about getting a # 5 skiptooth blade that leaves Buster with 1/4 inch long hair.
Never done this kind of thing before, so does anybody have any ideas?:smile:

Step 1 - find a groomer with a good reputaion for working with cats - or contact your vets office.
Step 2 - bring your new equipment with you and pay for the privilige of watching and helping if they will allow you to do so
Step 3 repeat step 2 as many times as it takes for you to be confident and competent alone - so much better to learn with backup and learn well then to create major problems for you and kitty.
 

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Just noticed your location; there are professionals in Vancouver who make house calls. The one I investigated, though, wanted information about the cat before she'd do the job, and Missy is a very scaredy cat. She runs and hides if the door bell rings. Then there's a session of reassurance I have to give Missy. That's why I tried it myself with the shears, but then I'm retired with lots of time. I think the cost was about $50.00. It's cheaper than vet treatment if anything goes wrong. There are also mobile salons that service specific areas. For some reason I can't recall how I found this information. It may have been a Google, or it may have been the Yellow pages.
 

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I agree with the above posters - speak to a professional groomer before attempting it yourself. It is extremely easy to injure animals during grooming, especially cats since their skin is tissue paper-thin. Also any matting makes it nearly impossible to see the skin underneath. Sometimes skin can be caught up inside the mat, so if you try to trim it out you can easily cut it.

When I shave matted cats I only use a #10 blade. The larger blades (#7, 5, 4, etc.), and ESPECIALLY skip tooth blades are very dangerous to use on cats. The larger the blade, the more space between the teeth and it is very easy to have the skin get caught between them causing injuries.

Working at a vet and also talking to vet techs, there are way too many horror stories of home grooming going badly. This can be anything from skin irritations, to stiches, to surgery, to even death of the pet. This is an area that requires someone who has had training in this area. Ask your vet if they offer grooming, or can recommend someone who grooms cats. You can also check a website like findagroomer.com or ask if any of your friends can recommend a good groomer by you. Good luck!
 

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I agree with the other posters. Take the cat to a professional and even then there are no guarantees. I took Azalia to a groomer years ago and he called me back about 2 hrs later telling me to pick her up that she would not tolerate the shears. He did her manicure, expressed her anal glands, and gave her a bath, but she drew the line at the shears. She smelled nice and her fur was shiny and soft, but no haircut.

What I did like with this particular groomer is that he would not dare sedate your cat. Some places just take the liberty to give them something under the table, and if anything goes wrong, then you have to rush over and remedy the situation...no thanks!
 

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Yeah, I wouldn't take clippers to your cat. You're asking for a vet bill. Spend the money on the groomer instead.
 

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My two five month old Himalayan kittens have very heavy cottony coats that mat easily. When I had to travel recently the young caregiver couldn't keep up with the grooming so I came home to find two kitties with several large mats each. I found the mats really hard to get under to work on so I bit the bullet and took them to Petsmart to be groomed. They tolerated it well and are now clean, sleek and even more adorable. I will let their fur grow back but try to keep ahead of the mats. Good to know that the shaving is easy on them, cute and practical though.
Jannerl
:p
 

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I will let their fur grow back but try to keep ahead of the mats.
Jannerl
:p
I use an ordinary hair comb with tines (it's the closest word I know) that are rather blunt to comb the matt prone areas each day. It seems to be keeping ahead of them, but they do try to form again. Missy still doesn't like it when the hair pulls a bit, but the comb gets down to the skin and I'm gentle and the blunt tines do not scratch her. Actually, she seems to rather like being combed when it doesn't pull.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I figure the cost of the clippers will pay for themselves in a year. Buster likes a body massage with hair clippers. Doesnt mind the noise .
Hopefully the Andis isnt too loud. :)
 

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My two five month old Himalayan kittens have very heavy cottony coats that mat easily.
Milky is also a Himalayan (9months old) and used to mat quite often. I used to have to brush him twice daily just to make sure his fur wasn't tangled anywhere. I've been giving him supplements (Solid Gold Seameal Powder) since the 2nd month I had him and now his coat is soft, shiny, thicker and healthier than before, and most importantly, doesn't mat like it used to. Now I can groom Milky once a day or even once every 2nd day, and it's perfectly fine. Not only is it good for hair growth, it's also good for skin and cell growth. Just a few sprinkles with each meal and that's all it takes! :smiles
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I got the Landis. It is very quiet. way quieter than a normal human clipper.
I am going to try cooncatbob's idea. Never thought I could do a full poodle cut. :razz:
 
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