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Some of you take such beautiful photos...Aside from having a high-end camera, do you have any tricks you use?

I've finally figured out to do basic adjustments to the camera while holding it under pillows, to keep the little mechanical noises from ruining the photo op..."oooh! what are you doing? let me wake up/turn around/quit the cute thing I am doing so I can stick my nose at the lens!..." And, for posed shots, it takes two people (one to hold snacks just out of view)...

Any other good ideas?

:) Fran
 

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The only things I do, are make sure there's natural light... and use the macro option on the camera, but stand far enough away.

I find natural light is super important!

My camera isn't great, not at all. I think I get some pretty impressive pictures (nothing like the others, but still good!).
 

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I have a Canon A75..... a nice digital camera for family use.

I STINK at taking pictures.
I am lucky to get a few good ones...
I agree with natural light, like this pic, taken on the auto setting,
right near the window.....my best cat photo ever.

 

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Definatley no expert on photography........not at all! But I like to make sure I take the picture so that the objects in the photo make sense. For example, a friend took a photo of a group of tiger lily flowers. She just aimed, and snapped. To me, a photo should almost tell a story. Look at the flowers, and find what angle works. What would look good in the picture you are about to take? Find something special, and pull it out through your photo. When I look at my friends pic of the flowers, there is no dimension to it at all........it's just flat flowers on a paper. Of course not all photo opps give you that opportunity, but you can still aim to have that photo tell it's own story. Some pictures are just that........pictures to capture a moment. In that case.......just don't cut off any heads! :lol: :lol: :lol:

I know it's probably silly the way I described it, but I don't know how else to say it.
 

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Natural light is best, I agree. You need enough so that you can get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blurring, though obviously cats often do
stay still.

Turn the flash off though - it rarely gives good results in my experience.

To begin with maybe try when they're asleep...



But the biggest tip I can give is take the shot from cat level - by which I mean that shots from human height of a cat down on the floor are not too interesting, mainly because you won't see much of his face only his back.

If your cat regularly sits on a chair, wall, knee etc then get down to his level as you would a human.

Ramsay on his chair:



Wide aperture used to blur his body and draw the viewer to his face.

Here by his favourite window, the red glow comes from some curtains:




Here's Hugo sitting on my friend Andrew's knee:




Blurring the background with a wide aperture i.e. a low f number like f/2.8 is good if you can manage it - if the background is some way off it works best (not easy indoors).

If your camera doesn't have manual controls then try the macro setting.




Black and white can be nice too:

 

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Those are gorgeous photos!

I try to use the Sports setting on my camera when Leroy's awake and definitely no flash (which makes him run and hide). I try to get him when he's sleepy or just waking up because he's less likely to make any sudden movements.

But some pictures do turn out kinda cool when they're moving about:

 

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One tip for those that use digital point and shoots. If you have a feature that makes a sound when you press the shutter button (like those that simulate the sound of a 35mm camera firing), turn off that sound. More often than not, the sound of the shutter may distract your kitty. Of course, SLRs do not have the quietness as a compact or a rangefinder Leica (film or digital).

Now for those that are a bit more advanced with their skills and have a good knowledge of flash, here is a way to get really good natural light photos when there is heavy backlighting and/or a large difference in contrast for the scene. Set your flash mode, assuming your camera supports it, to Flash On mode. Flash On, as opposed to autoflash, will fire the flash everytime regardless of the shutter speed. So if your compact indicates a shutter speed chosen of, say, 1/750sec, the flash will still fire. Autoflash is what keeps the flash off at speeds faster than 1/60 and turns it on slower than 1/60. Now if your camera is advanced enough to offer Flash Exposure Compensation, such as my Canon S70, set your flash EC to a setting of around -2 to -1. What this does is reduce the flash output slightly so that it will provide a fill light, yet not overwhelm the natural or room light. This will make the shadows less dark without giving the typical "flash look" to the photograph.
 
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