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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings and any advice is welcome. Okay, here's the situation: I got a kitten a few weeks ago - it is 4 months old. I have the litter box in the bathroom next to the toilet and it usually uses that to do its business (I clean the box daily). The past three days, however, it has urinated each day on my bed, right next to my pillow (and defecated once). The cat is very skittish of people and isn't very welcoming of being picked up or pet, although it's getting a little better. During the day, it is locked out of my bedroom and by and large I have no problems except at night and in the morning when it has access to my room. It never jumps on the bed when I am in it but the second I leave the room to shower it jumps up, urinates, and takes off. Leaving the cat out of the bedroom all day and night is not an option. It does not have a health problem.

What should I do? I clean the area and am trying to figure out how to fix this problem. One idea, recommended by a friend, is to catch the cat and rub its nose and face in the 'mistake.' Will it learn this way? Do I need to try to improve relations with the cat? (Not desirable as I have cat allergies and got the cat because I live on a small island and have vermin issues.)

Help, because if this is not solved soon the kitty is getting the boot from my house.
 

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Welcome, and I'm sorry you are having trouble with your new cat.

drharps said:
...recommended by a friend, is to catch the cat and rub its nose and face in the 'mistake.'
Will it learn this way?
No. Cats do not learn things the way dogs do. Your cat will not understand why you are doing that to it.
You say your cat does not have a health problem. Are you sure? Did a veterinarian rule that out with either a blood test or a urinalysis? If not, then there is no way the possibility of a medical problem could be ruled out. It certainly is unusual for such a young cat to be experiencing UTI problems, but it is not unheard of. The other possibility is a behavioral problem, and in this case I do think creating a closer bond with the cat would help solve things. Sorry about your allergies, though.

Maybe someone else with more experience than me will be able to help more.
Heidi
 

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dogs don't learn that way either.

They don't associate the event with the mess. Just that someone is suddenly forcing their face into urine or poo and have no idea why. The same goes for if something is destroyed when you aren't home. They just know that mommy and daddy just came home and are now yelling and hitting them and they again have no idea why.

Until you can figure out why he is doing it, I think keeping him out of the bedroom is the best thing. Plus, if you do have cat allergies it is best for you to have somewhere cat free.

If you aren't prepared to deal with these problems and are unwilling to form a relationship/bond with this cat due to your allergies, maybe you should return him now while he is still young and can find another home and invest in some mouse traps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Okay, a couple of follow ups. For starters, I haven't had the cat tested for urinary tract issues but there are two issues with this: One, the cat is not uncontrollably urinating, it very deliberately is urinating on this spot as there are no other times he is on the bed and there are no other places he urinates (other than the box). Two, I live on a remote island in the South Pacific and there are no vets on island (other than a single large animal vet that fixes dogs and cats) so I can't get it checked but there are no other cats I'm aware of that have gotten sick or ever been sick. Likewise, with the small island issue, I can't return the cat. The only options are let it go (it will likely be killed by dogs) or try to make it work as there are an abundance of cats on the island and no one would take this one when they can get 1000 other younger ones from a friend.

I have always been more of a dog person (my dog and the cat are pretty much best friends) and while I'm more than willing to form a bond with this cat (if I can avoid it that would be great but I'll take a cuddling cat over a 'look what I left in your bed' cat), I'm curious as to how this will help. By suggesting a closer bond that implies that the cat is urinating in my bed because it either doesn't know me or doesn't like me. Is this truly the case? And what other options are there to try if that doesn't work?
 

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drharps said:
By suggesting a closer bond that implies that the cat is urinating in my bed because it either doesn't know me or doesn't like me. Is this truly the case? And what other options are there to try if that doesn't work?
Well, no...that isn't what I meant, but I can see how it did sound that way! :lol: My husband and I can remove our clothing and leave them in seperate piles on the floor. HIS clothes are the only ones that would be pee'd on. I don't know if it was the cat saying "this is mine" or the scent of his sweat was encouraging the cat to pee there or if they knew I spent more time with them than he did. Sometimes, cats want attention, and they don't know how to get it. But they learn quickly that peeing somewhere they shouldn't earns them that attention, quick! Good (happy and smiling) or bad (angry and mad), it is still attention.
Cats with urinary tract infections will pee on 'soft' things because it hurts to pee if they have a UTI, so they look for 'soft' places to pee, hoping it won't hurt to pee there. Cats with UTIs will also pee in inappropriate areas right in front of their people, staring them in the eyes even, but it is sometimes the only way the cat can tell the person something is wrong.
I recall someone who posted once about their cat who was peeing everywhere...turned out the cat preferred to have TWO litterboxes, one to poo in and one to pee in. Cats can also be particular about the type of litter used (scent/texture) and it sounds like you keep the box cleaned of accumulated waste, so that shouldn't be the problem.
I understand your limitations with this kitten due to the area you are in and lack of options. I'm sorry this is so difficult, sometimes it is just a process of elimination. Sometimes, sadly, it results in the elimination of the cat. ...sometimes, no matter how much we want it to be, we just aren't a good fit with that particular pet...
Best wishes that this can be resolved. I know I would be mad as heck with a cat peeing on my bed. I have had a problem with cats peeing on bath/kitchen mats with rubber backing. My solution was to remove all kitchen rugs and keep bathroom doors closed.
heidi
 

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When you're in the shower does the cat have access to the litterbox? Or is the door closed? If the door is closed, I can see a 4 month old going in whatever spot looks good...and a nice cushy bed is a good spot as far as they're concerned. A 4 month old won't get the concept of waiting until the box is available. Or, even if the door is open the cat may be scared of the sound of the water.

FYI...a cat does not pee uncontrollably when they have a UTI, they just do it in places other than their box. And they may still use the box inconsistently. It also doesn't matter whether other cats are sick or not, a UTI is not caught from other cats.

This may be difficult because of your location, but you need to clean your bed with an enzymatic cleaner to break down the urine. Really soak the spot, not just the surface. Once a cat goes in a spot, if they can still smell it, they will tend to go there again. And they only thing that will take the smell away is an enzymatic cleaner. Nature's Miracle, Simple Solution, Odo Ban, Urine Off etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone for the help. I've tried bonding with the cat more and while it hasn't entirely solved the errant pee/poo problem, it's at least more comfortable around me.

While it's not solving the cause, but instead addressing the effect, I think I'm going to put tin foil over the area where it goes so I can prevent her going on my bed. Not sure if it'll work but without the ability to easily pick up the proper cleaner down here, I just want something that prevents it from going there. Hopefully it works but who knows - we'll see I guess.

Thanks again for your help.
 

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If you are allergic to cats, then don't let the cat in the bedroom (problem solved with the peeing :wink: ). I'm allergic to cats and I don't let my cat in the bedroom so I have a space to breathe easier and I have an air purifier in there too. There are some other threads on the forum too that might help. Check out the behavior and health sections (stickies at the top of each). Vacuuming is important too and cleaning sheets and pillows as well. Good luck! :D
 

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Nito pees on my bed whenever I leave him alone for too long. He'll do it as soon as I come back, not when I am gone, especially if I don't feed him right away! Luckily, he's gotten used to me being gone at class, and I began to reward him heavily for using the litter box. Except now, he goes and does his business, and then comes running right out, singing for treats. *sigh*.

I do hope you can figure out the problem. Maybe you could try two litter boxes, like suggested, or giving the kitty a delicious treat whenever you catch her using the right bathroom.
 

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Just wanted to add one thing.
I realize you're in a unique situation and can't get to a vet so, in case it is a UTI, at the very least I would make sure he gets as much moisture in his diet as he possibly can. No dry food, only wet and even add a little water to that. If it isn't too serious, that alone can clear things up.
Good luck.
 
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