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Discussion Starter #1
Like the title says.

I have a 2 yr old tabby(Gigi) that has been with me for
about 1 1/4 yrs.

I found her on craigslist from a couple that got her and
some other cat, probably one of her siblings. They were
adopted together as kittens from a shelter. As they grew up
the lady said that they could not get along.

Gigi was an indoor cat and the other cat was a
outdoor/indoor cat. There both spayed/neutered.
They decided they had to get rid of one but then choose to
sell them both.

I'm thinking of getting a kitten. That's what a lady at
Furry Friend Rescue recommended. There usually full of energy
and play. That way they can keep each other company while
I'm at work or doing other things. I don't know how she
will react but I truly believe that there is a way to make
this work. I'm sure there are people here that have
accomplished this. I know it possible. Has anyone done this?
Any tips,advice,guidance, prayer?
 

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Well, the fact that they got rid of both makes me think they weren't honest about what the problem really was, because most people wouldn't rehome both cats.

I think a kitten is the wisest choice. But you might want to read some posts here from people who have adopted kittens, even with another cat. Speaking from experience, they're cuter than anything on earth, but they are like infants/toddlers. Brats. Willful. No sense of boundaries. That said, I wouldn't trade my calibratz for the world. But kittens can be DIFFICULT. Especially if Gigi is a good cat. My twinz were quite a change, because Cinderella and Cleo never got into any trouble. Didn't chew anything, climb curtains, jump on counters - nothing.

Here's a great site for introductions:

Cat-to-Cat Introductions | Little Big Cat
 

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A kitten?

DON'T DO IT! SAVE YOURSELF!

:wink

I love Shepherd Book and he has a forever home here but I'll tell ya... if I had it to do over again I wouldn't get a kitten.

The spastic energy..... oh Lord the spastic energy....
 

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I always thought that was fun, and they do grow out of it, not completely, but most cats quiet down by the time they are 5+ yrs. It also depends on the cat as an individual, breed influence (Siamese or mixes, Bengals, etc.) are more active than Persians or other longhaired cats. Usually their play times are shorter than a shorthaired cat as they get hotter. Why don't you foster a kitty from a rescue with option to purchase?
 

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Kittens can be a handful. They are destructive and don't realize that their teeth and claws are AMAZINGLY sharp.

However, if you ever want to introduce any sort of cat into the home and you have any other animal (dog or cat. It doesn't matter), there's going to need to be an introductory period. I've found that introducing a dog to a new cat can be the scariest, so you're lucky you only are introducing cats (my dog may only be a dachshund, but he, like many hunting dogs, has a very strong prey drive. It required me to give him special training on how to behave around the cats).
Anyway, set up a room that the new cat can stay in by themselves. Allow your animals to smell each other through a crack in the door (there may be plenty of space beneath the doors, but you could have the door cracked open). Be sure to monitor them. If they show aggression, distract one or the other. After a few days, let the new cat wander the house and put your other cat in the room. This is so they can smell the other without actually needing to be in the other's face. I found a week of doing this was necessary for them to get used to the smell of the other.

When they are first going to see each other, don't be surprised if there's still aggression shown, especially from your already settled cat. There will always be that. Just make sure they don't fight. Watch them closely. If you're satisfied with how they behave (and this is probably after hours of monitoring), feel free to leave the new cat to wander the house freely.

Note, I'm not a professional. I just have experience in introducing animals to each other. This is also the same advice that was given to me from the breeders who I got one of my cats from. I don't like the idea of just tossing a new cat into a home with already settled animals. It's too stressful for both parties. Going slow is best for animals, especially since one of them is in a completely new environment.
 

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^ all covered in the link I posted
 

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I'm not sure if you're thinking of getting a kitten because you want a kitten, or because you think your cat wants a friend and the rescue lady suggested a kitten. In any event, you should only get another cat (or kitten) if YOU want one.

On the assumption you do, then a kitten is typically (not always, but typically) easier to introduce than a cat, since kittens are not territorial and pose less of a "threat" to the resident cat.

I found catloverami's comment about breed to be interesting. I have a Ragdoll and a Ragdoll/Persian mix. I adopted both of them as kittens and they were never destructive or overly energetic. They slept less than they do now, and they were a bit more playful, but that's about it. They were otherwise a dream. Perhaps I got lucky! On the downside, they were the exception to the rule when it came to introductions, since I had a very difficult time introducing them (read 4 months of separation and baby gates, and hours upon hours of behavior modification)...even though they were only 10 weeks and 16 weeks old at the time.

In short, there are no guarantees, but if you want a kitten, then go for it...but introduce the kitten to Gigi slowly, following the guidance in the link posted by Marie. Also, you'll increase your chance of success if you try to "match" Gigi's personality. So, if Gigi is quiet and shy, try to get a quiet/shy kitten or young cat. If Gigi is more outgoing, then aim for a more outgoing kitten/cat.
 

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Great advice! And always adopt because you want another cat, too. There are no guarantees that they'll become buddies, so it's important that you want a second cat for yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you everybody for your feedback.

It might not be a good idea for me right now to get a new
cat(or kitten) since I have no room to setup a base camp in
a different room to slowly introduce them both. Also Gigi
has some behavior issues that seem to me would be cured with
some play therapy. I don't think it would be a good idea to
introduce a frustrated-bored cat to a newcomer. I thought
that introducing them both face to face right away might
work, If I intervene if things get too rough. It sounded like
a good idea to me at the time, but if what the Cat-To-Cat
introduction article says is true then it would not work and
just make things worse for everybody.

Marie, the article was insightful and I'm looking into the
play therapy article to help me setup a play routine with
Gigi.

As for Gigi, I have to reconsider about adopting a new
kitten. While it may be true that cats do get lonely as well,
perhaps it's not the best time for me to do this.
 

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I was thinking also of getting another cat for Ritz, around 2.5 years old female, rescued from my condo building with litter mates two years ago, and successfully resocialized by friend of mine ("T"). Prior to Ritz, I never had been around cats. I was thinking maybe a calm cat would calm Ritz, would make her less afraid.
I rescued "Autumn", a 7 week old female kitten on Friday evening from my condo building, which is where I feed a community cat colony. Autumn is quite friendly and has a clean bill of health except for worms (FIV and FELK negative). Autumn is staying at T's house.
Autumn came for short visits Saturday and Sunday. After two short introduction sessions, I decided I don't have the patience for slow introductions and will not take the chance of causing Ritz any future/additional health/behavioral problems. Ritz is still is scared of sudden noises, doesn't like strange people in the house and has stress-induced FLUTD. But she sleeps with me, loves neck massages and looks at me adoringly. That's all I need.
In other words, like another poster(s) indicated, seriously consider the personality of your current cat and how much patience you have.
 

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I truly believe some cats are meant to be only cats. They have such a special relationship with their person (and they really do sleep most of the time we aren't around, and aren't lonely).
 
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