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Discussion Starter #1
...if she's getting enough nutrition?

My cat looks fabulous and has a ton of energy. She's 9 years old and has been on raw for a few months now (I think almost 6 or so).

Anyway, she hasn't gained enough jaw strength to eat full bones so I've been getting them ground. Every once in a while I will put a chicken rib in her bowl with her other food but she hasn't yet been able to break one down.

The problem with ground bones, besides obviously not encouraging her strength, is that she doesn't eat the bigger chunks. She will chew the small chunks of bone but if there's anything the size of a dime or larger she won't even touch it.

I just want to make sure she's getting enough nutrients out of the ground bones that way. Maybe it's hard to tell if you can't see the food.

Thanks for any info you can give me!
 

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Yes she does look fab, and if she has tons of energy at 9 y.o., I would say she's beeing fed very well. It's likely that she's getting all the nutrients she needs, otherwise being on this diet for 6 mos. if she were lacking some nutrients she would likely be showing some deficiencies. A shiny lustrous coat is a good indication of good health.
 

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Have you tried differant types of bone?

Rajah won't eat chicken ribs unless they are smashed but will eat small chicken necks just fine. He also will eat whole quail with no problem. He just doesn't like the "easy" bones...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks to you both :)

I will try whole chicken necks. So far she hasn't eaten any other chicken or cornish game hen bones. I'll try the necks though, she might like them!
 

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Perhaps she would be able to break down the little bones of a 1-day old chick? She may struggle with the skull though. We get 1-day old chicks from the chicken farmer for 2 cents each here in Holland and the cats absolutely love them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was actually just thinking about that! Or mice. I just need to find a place I can buy them. Rodentpro and Hare Today are both verrry expensive to ship to California.

Thanks!
 

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Thanks to you both :)

I will try whole chicken necks. So far she hasn't eaten any other chicken or cornish game hen bones. I'll try the necks though, she might like them!
Maybe she will but maybe she won't. Rajah tends to be a very strange cat. You'd think he would prefer very easy bones - but he actually prefers the hard bones to eat.

Leave it to me to find some very strange cats:wink
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone. I got her some baby mice today from the pet supply (still searching for a supplier). Is it okay to give her two or three at a time? Or just one? They're pretty small. I was thinking about just giving her one tonight with some chicken breast to see how she handles it.

Thanks!
 

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Okay, so she didn't eat it. But she did take it out of her bowl and it ended up about 2 feet away! I guess it's good she at least showed some interest. I'll try again later tonight or tomorrow morning.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
She ate a mouse! She played with it for about five minutes, and then she ate it. So now I just need to know when I should switch to adult mice or if I could keep feeding the baby ones.
 

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Feed the baby ones until you think she's solidly hooked on mice. Then buy slightly bigger ones, offer those for a while, then get slightly larger ones, and so on.

The only problem I think you might run into is an aversion to the fur, but if you take it slow, she'll get introduced to it so gradually she won't even notice that her once-naked pinkies are now a wee bit fuzzy. :)

Remember that mice and other whole prey meals are completely balanced within themselves - so you will still need to offer bone-in meals, liver and additional organ products as 10, 5 and 5 percent, respectively, of the non-prey meals.
 
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