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Discussion Starter #1
I'm pretty sure when I get my kitty I want to do a raw diet. How much of the diet can or should rodents?

Is frankenprey a better option?
 

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If you can get the cat to eat whole prey then basically all the diet can be feeder rodents.

I'd add in chicks as well, and maybe occasionally crickets or other bugs. But that's basically their natural diet.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you! That's what I was thinking but then I found some articles online (great source I know) that had me a bit worried about whole prey.

I have basically unlimited access to feeder rodents as I breed them for my pet reptiles. They would certainly be the most convenient base for me.
 

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I suspect one problem would be people buying feeder rodents and not knowing what those animals had been fed, what their conditions were. Since you're raising your own, you know about gut loading and you will be making sure the rodents' base diet is good, so there should be no troubles at all. :) I am envious, but also do not want to raise rodents so.... ;)
 

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Very true! Trust me I would prefer not to breed rodents either but when you breed snakes it kinda has to happen lol

I've actually switched my feeder rodents over to an organic diet - just for future kittie's health. They get a 95% organic corn wheat and soy free dog food, meal worms and crickets (which eat the same dog food and kitchen scraps) organic spring and spinach mix, organic carrots, organic coconut flakes, organic flax and Sunflower seeds, an organic 32 superfood mix powder that includes spirulina, cranberries, wheat grass juice, blue berries, pomegranate, broccoli, and a whole bunch of other stuff. They also get probiotics. Oh they even drink filtered water.

So I'm pretty sure I have some of the healthiest feeder rodents around if I do say so myself!

What size rodents go over best with kitties? Do they like pinkies or furred better? How much do I feed?
 

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I cannot answer your questions, but my adult cat was cheerful about the nest of pinky mice we found. Of course it was just a one time snack, not a full meal. ;)

My adult python was also pleased with furries I was needing dispose of because the injured ratsnake had died... but the look on the python's face was priceless as I put these tiny things in with him. :D

All my rodents have been frozen/thawed. Woule you be feeding fresh killed or live or frozen/thawed? Just curious, it should not really make any difference, I don't think!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I feed pre killed to my snakes. I was thinking frozen thawed for the kitty though as an extra precaution against parasites
 

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I don't think my cat would eat a dead rodent. I actually bought two live white small feeder mice once but they wouldn't run so my cats actually weren't interested. They actually touched noses and the other cat just walked away after awhile. It was weird. I gave them to someone with a snake.
 

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I feed pre killed to my snakes. I was thinking frozen thawed for the kitty though as an extra precaution against parasites
Sounds like a plan.

You can definitely feed a variety, but I'd say mostly adults should be the goal. To start off with pinkies are usually easiest and then work your way up...but if it's a kitten I'd introduce halved full adult mice very early on. The fur tends to end up being the sticking point, but kittens are really adaptable so the sooner you jump that hurdle the better.

I don't think my cat would eat a dead rodent.
If your cat has never seen a dead rodent it won't recognize it as food. Feral kittens, or even outdoor barn cats, usually have rodents presented to them by their mothers when they're very young. And then she 'trains' them to recognize living mice as food by (Sorry folks, a bit graphic) wounding mice and presenting her kittens with mice still alive but unable to escape;. Gradually she'll build up to bringing unharmed live mice for the kittens to dispatch themselves.

You can't just present an indoor cat with mice and expect them to figure it out. Sure, some will, but some won't. Muffin loves to catch mice, but he's started to catch them very carefully as they're no fun when they stop running. This is not fun for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for your help. Especially about the fur! I actually have so options about that - i raise a few hairless rodents too lol!

Ok I feel better about my raw food plan for future kitty now :)
 

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I'd suggest including the hair if at all possible. If you're starting with a kitten it should be fine. The fur is sort of the 'fibre' of natural cat food, they are meant to have it. You just might need to work up to it.
 
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