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I'm wondering how everyone found thier vet, amd how they detirmine if its a good doctor or not.

My vet was picked from a phone book (new to the area). I called several places, getting quotes and such. One place quoted a horibble price (not that i wouldn't put out the cash, its just why get ripped off?)

When I took Vash in for his cat visectomy they were very nice. Vash was comfortable (to some degree) when I went to pick him up and was his normal self as soon as I saw him. I live down the street and was walking (in January, after a big snow storm) and forgot my extra blanket for him. I started to take off my coat to wrap Vash in it and one of the techs stopped me and gave me one of thier towles so he would stay warm without me freezing.

I figured that was more than enough to keep me going back, but there could be something I'm overlooking soo.....
 

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Well compassion is certainly one thing you want to look for.

Now adays I work in the practice myself, but for years I struggled trying to find good doctors! All the way from Maine to Virginia, and there was always nearly something about a vet that I disliked.

Some things which are important to me, and you can then decide if they are to you or not.

1.) Must feel that I have a complete satisfied understanding of pets health/contitions etc before I leave any vet office.
2.) Feel that the whole office team is concerned about the well being of my animals.
3.) Not to feel rushed, that the doctor understands my concerns and willing to speak with me about them, even if they are silly or common place issues to him/her.
4.) To have a doctor that KNOWS what they are talking about. One which continually educates themselves on all aspects of companion animal science.
5.) That any injection, procedure, and tests is explained to me in full BEFORE they have done it.

Price is not a concern of mine, I have noticed sometimes with higher prices for vaccines, you also get a garuntee with them. Not all vets will do that.
If I have to pay $5.00 more for a team that is loving towards my animal, and able to do what needs to be done, then I'll do it.


Hope this helps! :)
 

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I would also consider the location of the Vet obviously in case of an emergancy you would like to get your cat to a vet that knows the cats medical history and fast.
 

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Our kitty has just experienced liver failure. We took him to a lady vet in town and have been totally amazed by this woman.

She kept him in the hospital for 3 days, let him come home with us with instructions on how to force-feed and care for him. She then telephoned every day to see how he was doing - including weekends. When I called to tell her he had actually eaten a little bit on his own, she was almost in tears and said how worried she had been about him. She wants to do more blood work this week and is still calling on a regular basis (like Sunday afternoon) to see how he is doing.

She has gone far above the call of duty and you can bet she will receive a nice thank-you gift from Simba and his family for her love, tenderness and caring.

We are moving to a new town in about a month, but Simba will be coming back to this beautiful lady for any treatments or check ups he needs.
 

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Vet rating

Next time you call around, you might ask *why* they charge so much. It may be that they use the newest (and safest) gas anesthesia rather than just injectables (which may paralyze the cat but not provide any pain relief--typical of the cheaper places), they probably have proper surgical monitoring equipment such as EKG, pulse oximeter, blood pressure monitor, etc., and they probably provide post-operative pain medication. Cheaper places may not be the safest or best for your cat. A clinic that charges a lot will be happy to explain to you the reasons, and usually they will be good ones. Price is not always the best determinant of a good vet.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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I'm not really sure. I've not chosen a perma-vet yet. I've taken Drizzle to two different ones. The one I'm likley to go back to... I don't know. It's modern and clean and a very hospital-like organization. That doesn't sit well with me in some aspects as, I wish it was more nurturing. Yet the one before was very "mom and pop" and that didn't sit well either.

The final call for me is going to be over-all care. I've yet to see these vets interact with Drizzle. Those who did for his first shots where excellent. If these folks are, it'll be tough. If they aren't good, I'll switch back. It all depends. Gut instinct really.
 

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Cheap but good spay and Neuter can be hard to find. I myself have run the gommet for my pets and fosters from $30 to $180.
At our practice, we charge $200. For those who are unknowing about the other prices of some places, willingly except to get it done with us. Other's whom have used things like the snap certificates, or even thoughs who I feel sometimes take advantage of the nickle spay clinics will basically laugh in my face at the price we charge.

However, yes this price includes EVERYTHING. As a good vet how much they charge for a spay, they might quote you something around $50-80, typically that's BEFORE adding on the cost of additional bloodwork and anesthia which all cats have to have. So sometimes you often wind up paying more. I myself ran into that problem years back with a rather large surprise bill when picking up my animals.

Places like Banfield use the safest anesthia availble. The recovery time is quicker and easier for the patient, it includes all bloodwork, heart monitoring, a full comprehensive exam, and any other additional monitoring needed. We also send you home with pain killers and antibiotics which honestly, I had never even heard of, until I started working there! They also have programs which cover the cost of the spay/neuter and you can safe a lot of money that way. Kind of think of it as their own health insurance, but it's not insurance. It's coverage which takes care of your pets yearly needs plus some additionals.

So make sure you do your research, any vet office should be open with you to share information on their practices and policies.

As stated not all practices use safe procedures. If you were going under the knife, wouldn't you want to know you were getting the best care and safest drugs/monitoring tools? :lol:
 

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In addition to all of the other things mentioned, call-backs are a big deal to me. My cat has had digestive problems for some time now and the vet we took him to for about a year NEVER called after a procedure or after a med-switch to check how things were going. Our new vet though is WONDERFUL and she calls a few days after we're in (for anything that isn't routine) to check how things are going. It makes me feel good that the vet goes through her records of patients that she saw recently to check up on their progress and her interest shows that she really cares about her patients. My cat could have died by now and the old vet would have never bothered to check up or find out.
 

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Jen: That is very true. Out of the many vets I have seen, not a single one of them called me back later on, no matter how highly they came recommened to me or how much I had to pay for their "superior services".
At our practice now, we do call backs and I can see it makes a large difference for the clients. It's something that only takes a little while, to do something that means so much, I don't see why all doctor offices, for pets and people don't do it.
 
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