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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A while ago I posted about wanting to get a ocelot for a pet and possibly starting a conservation. Well my hubby finally got around to talking to our vet about it. He doesnt suggest having a ocelot as a pet but loves the idea of us starting a conservation. He did say if we want more of a pet for a wild cat he suggests cheetahs or margays. Which is good for us because we have already been looking into getting a margay. Of course there still a wild animal, but there easier to manage. For some reason they got on the subject of monkeys, but he said monkeys dont make good pets. He said they can be good, but for the most part once they reach middle age they start to slowly turn, just an fyi for anyone thinking about getting a monkey.

I told my hubby no way to the cheetah, at least with the smaller cat I wont feel like it wants to eat me every time it looks at me lol.
 

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I'm sorry for my ignorance regarding wild animals in the city (or well, at least in a place they don't belong to), but where would you get the big cats from? Rescue them from irresponsible pet owners or something like that? Sorry, again, but since it is something unheard of here in my country, I just can't imagine how to start a conservation if you have no animals to....conserve...

I remember the story here in Chile about a Bengali white tiger who was abandoned by a nasty circus. A place called Buin Zoo rescued him, treated him and gave him a place to live. But then, that's a big zoo.

Thank you!
 

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Yeah, I wouldn't want a cheetah either. They can't retract their claws... so even if one was mild tempered, and just wanted to give you a playful swipe or a a 'bear' hug, you'd still have a good chance of getting scratched up! (and I get enough of that with the domestic cats at the sanctuary who decide they want their claws out when climbing all over me!)

I think monkeys, for the most part, are just kind of creepy. Some are cute (spider monkeys!) yeah, but to live with one would be too much.

I still wish I could come live with you! LOL I can't do much physically, but I would earn my keep in any way possible ^_^
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@Lenkolas I live on 900 acres. Acquiring the big cats could either be easy or hard lol. If i find a breeder within my state i would just have to get approved for a special licence, build a special fence and a few other things. Acquiring the cats for a conservation is much easier, i would have to get approved to buy them from outside my state but once approved i can buy them from anyone. Of course its not as simple as it sounds, but it would be worth it. Especially if we can get a breeding program started. Once we get built up a bit we want to exchange cats so the blood lines arent thinned out and producing more cats is possible. Also if any needed rescueing i would happily give them a safe place to live. We are also in the talks of raising other animals, such as rabbits, so they can hunt there own food rather then being given a plate of raw meat.

Also my part of Texas (southern part) is part of where they used to be. I imagine theres still a few out there in the wild, but not seen. But they have been found as far as Arizona i believe, it might be new mexico? lol im not good with location, its the state right next to texas. Ocetlots.

lol @Vivid Dawn
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@hal1 we were originally talking about getting a serval (still might), but i would rather an animal i can help save. we have plenty of land that were not using, we think turning some of it into a conservation would be a good thing, especially since ocelots are endangered.
 

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I would volunteer with a sanctuary that manages that kind of wild animal before commiting to getting a wild cat. Better to know up front the issues, challenges, comittement you'll require before you jump into this.
 

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I echo Mitts & Tess's suggestion. Better to get the experience at an established sanctuary so you know what to expect and how to manage the animals. Some males can become very aggressive if not bred or often enough. You really should read up, and volunteer at a zoo, or sanctuary as much as possible before taking on such a project, otherwise you may end up with animals that you can't manage and can't sell, and then what becomes of them? Zoos are very picky about bloodlines these days for breeding.
 

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Check out http://bigcatrescue.org/ Pick their brains a bit. They do what you're talking about. They get quite a few Servals and the like from people that thought it would be cool to have a big exotic cat but found out it's not as easy as they thought it would be. I wanted a Serval for many years but after reading up on what owning them is really like, I decided that the "wildest" cat I would ever consider owning is a Savannah (serval bread with a domestic cat) and then only an F2 or lower. It's a lot harder than I had imagined to own a big, wild cat. I ultimately settled on a Cheetoh which is only 1/8th wildcat. I'm very happy with that decision. I dig my Cheetoh. How could you not love this guy?





 
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