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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
what does it mean ? I was going thru the search on here and alot of people saying how their cats dont have a huge thirst drive, yet Tuna has a huge thirst drive, infact he would only drink out of the tap, ( I got a huge bowl of water next to his food and he wont touch it) he would go to the bathtub and meow infront of it until i come and turn on the tap for him.

he would then sit there for about 2 all the way up to 5min and drink water



total of usually 3times a day..if its not the bathroom tap he would jump on the kitchen counter and meow infront of its tap for me to give open it and let water out or in my smaller bathroom he would meow for a drink..

any idea why he wants so much water ? while my other 2 cats drink out of the bowl here and there but not nearly as much as I see tuna drink water out of the tap
 

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Mia drinks alot of water too. I am glad she has a high thirst drive as she does eat dry food. She will drink her almost her whole bowl daily.

I had a cat growing up that would only drink running water from the kitchen sink or the bathtub. Didnt have water fountains for cats back then. :razz:
 

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If a cat is on a 100% dry food diet, they need to drink enough water to make up for the difference between dry (10% water) and their natural prey (about 75% water). Doing the math yields a need for them to drink 1.25 cups of water for every cup of dry food consumed. Most cats will only drink about half of what they need, which is why many dry fed cats develop kidney and urinary issues.
 

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As doodlebug said, dry foods lack the moisture content of the natural prey that a feline's body was designed to eat. Most dry foods I have checked contain a maximum of 8% moisture, as opposed to canned foods which contain 78% (or more) moisture. So yes, cats who eat a dry diet must drink A LOT more in order to digest their food, and very few healthy cats will drink enough to make up the moisture deficit in a dry diet. This means that most dry fed cats are chronically dehydrated, which can have devastating long-term effects on the cat's health.

The first thing folks generally notice after switching their cats from a dry to a canned (or homemade) diet is the dramatic change in the cat's coat appearance and texture. A properly hydrated cat has a coat that is lush, incredibly soft, shiny, and has far fewer mats. You may not notice just how less-than-perfect your cat's coat is until and unless you switch him to an exclusively canned diet and see the difference for yourself. The change can be quite dramatic, and it happens very quickly (in a matter of hours) once the cat is fully hydrated. For my cats who eat canned food (most are on a raw diet), I also mix quite a lot of warm water into their food to make it "canned food soup" that they can lap up. That improves their hydration even more.

Since your boy obviously prefers running water, you should buy him a pet fountain or leave a faucet dripping slowly for him all the time. He shouldn't have to wait until you turn on a faucet in order for him to drink. This is particularly important as long as you continue to feed kibble.

Laurie
 

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I'm glad there is no diabetes! I have worked with many diabetic animals and that is usually the first sign something is wrong.
 

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My neighbor's cat presents the same behavior, I had never heard of it until he told me. It seems it's not diabetes either. He started suddenly one day. We're still puzzled and wondering what it may be. The vet didn't attribute it any importance, but still it's a bit extreme behavior...
 

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Some cats just prefer running water, so that, in itself, is not cause for concern. If the cat is frequently demanding water, though, esp. if the cat is middle-aged or older, it would be wise to have the cat tested not only for diabetes, but for kidney problems and hyperthyroidism, as well. All three conditions can cause excessive thirst.

Intact male cats also have a tendency to drink huge volumes of water because of their drive to mark territory.

Laurie
 

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Thanks Laurie, I will tell my neighbor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
well I did a blood test which cost me about 250 and they said he was fine but they told me to do a urine test too but 1-its $$$ 2-its hard to actually get a urine sample from my cat

so what do you think.. should I spend the money and get the urine test done
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I cant remember what but I know the blood test tells you if he has diabetes but not sure if the blood work tells if there are kidney problems

anyone know ?
 

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well I did a blood test which cost me about 250 and they said he was fine but they told me to do a urine test too but 1-its $$$ 2-its hard to actually get a urine sample from my cat

so what do you think.. should I spend the money and get the urine test done
?
I cant remember what but I know the blood test tells you if he has diabetes but not sure if the blood work tells if there are kidney problems

anyone know ?
You should always, always, ALWAYS request a hard copy of ALL tests run on your cat so that you can go over them at home and use them while researching or asking questions (like in this thread) on the Internet. All blood tests and blood panels are not created equal. Some include certain things that others do not. You won't know exactly what was and wasn't tested until you have a copy of the lab results in hand. So, go to your vet and get a copy of the lab results, then post them all here so that we can take a look and see exactly what's been done and what may still be advisable to do.

Again, depending on which tests were run, a blood panel may identify kidney issues, diabetes, and hyperthyroidism. A urinalysis can further clarify diagnosis of diabetes and kidney issues, if necessary.

Laurie
 

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Last time I had to take Kodak in to get a sample to test his urine, we locked him in a room over night without a litter box (his vet appt was first thing in the morning) They catheterized him easily and drew a sample. I think it ran me about 90.00 for the whole visit.
 
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