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Hey everyone. I'm getting my baby, Oliver, fixed in a couple of weeks. He's almost 5 months and the vet said this is fine. So i need some support...my poor baby will be staying overnight at the vet and I just know he will not take it well.

I also need some advice. My 4 cats that live at my parents all have their claws....because it's expensive to take them out, I know it hurts them, and they all go outside. I am still trying to decide what is best for Oliver. He's strictly indoor (except when the little guy sneaks out of the door when we come and go) so he doesn't need claws to defend him self. He likes to sharpen his claws on the furniture and on people. :? I clip them with my finger nail clipper and it doesn't hurt him and he doesn't seem to mind but I was leaning towards getting him declawed...although we've never had this done for any of our cats.

So, knowing all this, am I a bad person for thinking of declawing him? Is it inhumane? I heard it's equaivalent to a human having the top appendage of thier finger cut off..... :shock: What do you think I should do? Thanks!!
 

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Do what you feel you have to do. I have two strictly indoor cats that have claws and they're fine. You just have to train them to scratch their post or get a corrugated cardboard scratcher. Mine use their scratcher 90% of the time... the other 10% off the time it's the sofa or my office chair... so I'm still working with them. It's a gradual process.

I find it a bit inhumane to declaw a cat, because it's removing the top appendage of the claw. BUT, I'm going to sound hypocritical, because I can't say I won't have it done to future cats.

If you have expensive furniture and things, or it becomes a problem that you can't correct.. and your only other resort is getting rid of the cat, then I would declaw it. A cat getting declawed is inhumane, but a cat without a home is even worse. :(

If you haven't tried them yet, try softpaws - www.softpaws.com

Let us know how everything turns out.
 

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Personally, I would never declaw a cat, namely because their front claws are their first line of defense. They can be trained not to scratch on other things in your home, but you must supply an irrestable claw post for them. I have made for my menagerie a 4-foot tall post of oak wood secured to a flat piece of plywood. Most of the time they use that, but at other times they use the 2 x 4s' that are used to hold up some wall-mounted tables that I have made in the house. I also have a hide-a-bed couch. Sometimes they like to claw that up. So, I placed old bed spreads and blankets over it to protect it from their clawing. Now, generally they like to sleep on the hide-a-bed or when they are playing chase-and-ambush, they will run all over the couch.
 

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I am totaly against declawing. To my way of thinking if you don't want furniture destroyed why get a cat? Some cats do it others don't. There is always the chance they will destroy something, it's one of the pleasures on owning an animal. If you want a perfect little house don't have animals. Cats have claws for a reason, it's cruel to disfigure an animal to make your life easier.
 

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I have avoided revealing this, as it is such a heated topic, with good reason. However, both Boo and Drizzle are de-clawed (and spayed and neutered).

Now, as to Why:

First, they are both indoor cats, so they don't need the defense portion. But that wasn't a reason for doing it. When Boo was de-clawed, it was before I was really a cat parent myself. I'd only just had Drizzle a few days. I knew nothing about cats. My sister chose to have Boo de-clawed. I don't know the reasons. However, she too was a new cat parent at the time. We've never had pets as kids because my Mom was "Alergic" :roll:

I don't recall what reasons made my Sis have Boo de-clawed. She'll have to post them. I do believe it may have been because Boo's claws where, literally, RAZOR sharp. She was (and is) a very skittish little girl because my sisters Ex was too rough with her. He had no competence on how to handle an animal. He is an idiot. Right PrettyKitty? :D Anyway, I believe Boo's razor-sharpness and skittish-ness where perhaps the focal reasons for the de-clawing. That is what I surmise. It may have been that at the time it was thought to be the standard normal thing to do, common practice. I really don't know.

I do know that Boo has become less skittish since. Also since the Ex became and Ex and not a "current". :p

I can speak for why Drizzle was de-clawed...

With Boo de-clawed, Drizzle was injuring her during play. It was too harmful and dangerous for Drizzle to remain clawed while Boo was not.

I can't say I disagree with either choice. In my experience it has had no ill effects on either cat in the long run. In the immiediate, did it have some ill effects? Yes. But only in that they had to adapt some things. All around it was the best choice for these two cats, thier 'parents', and this situation.

Now that it's been over and done with for 2 or so months (for Drizzle, many months for Boo) it is fine and dandy.

They where un-able to use the floor-to-cieling cat tower for a while. They where used to digging claws into climb. Now? They've adapted and climb without claws. They still scratch on furniture, lol, but not because of claws/lack of claws, but for routine, excersize, and habbit. Both cats are happier, believe it or not, because when they play they aren't injuring each other. Likewise, it's nicer to not be injured when holding them.

For our cats, and us, it was the best solution and has had no long-term ill effects. It has had benefits, to be honest.

Does that mean it is best for all cats/other cats, or other people? No. Each cat and each person is individual and each choice must be reached as such.



IF YOU DE-CLAW:

FIND AND USE A LASER

When Boo was de-clawed, it was done with normal, standard, BLADES. In hind-sight this was a bad thing. However, at the time, the use of a laser was not known to us except through my sister's Ex, who told us it was a multiple-hundreds-of-dollars procedure, and even then we didn't know of any vets who did it, or any people who had had it done to thier pets. Boo, afterword - being de-clawed and spayed - was miserable for a week. It was very tough on my Sister. At the time I'd only had Drizzle a week or so and wasn't much of a "cat parent" yet lol. It was terrible on her though, and of course, worse on Boo, but it was thought to have been a "nessascary evil"

When it came time for Drizzle... I agreed, because he was hurting Boo. when they would play, his claws would cut her, and it was too risky and harmful to leave his claws in. So, I, now a cat parent, agree for Drizzle to be de-clawed. Thankfully, a Doctor-friend informed me her cats where done with lasers, and that they had suffered nill. They'd been playing and back to thier old selfs within the time it took them to wake up from the drugs. So I insisted we investigate this, hoping we could do Drizzle this way. Sure enough we found a vet that did it for $119 - when normally it costs about 30-40 with blades. However, if it had been available for Boo and we'd known of it, we surely would have done so for her too.

Point is: If you do it, FIND and PAY for a LASER.

No Pain. No recovery. To ill effects. Drizzle was walking that afternoon. He was kneading me on the car ride home. He was fine with it. He was never in pain. I never saw a drop of blood. He was fine. Sleepy, but fine.

Will he "cry" when you leave him/her at the vet? Yes. I cried too. So will you. So do most cat parents. It's traumatic to leave them at the vet, especially over-night. Thankfully, it seems MORE SO for you than them. To them, they forget about it as soon as you pick them up and hold them. They're like "I couldn't find you! Finally! Yay! HUG!" and happy. Will they put up more of a fuss to go back in the carrier and to the vet again in the future? LOL. Yeah. But, point is: it's really not that trying on them. They're more curious at everything new, and a lil confused. As soon as you hold them though, they are over it. Happy. At least, that was my experience.
 

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Stormy and Justin both have their claws. I see no reason to declaw, especially with all the horrible things I have heard about the process.
Do they claw the furniture sometimes? Yes. But really they don't harm it that much and they are using the scratch post about 95% of the time since I sprayed Feliway on the couch.
I try to keep their nails trimmed but they both like to squirm when I do it, even though I have never cut into the quick. I just try to get a couple done every few days. As I type this, Stormy was sitting in my lap being calm, so I just clipped 3 nails that had gotten sharp. :D
 

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Thanks MrPurry for telling us about the laser process. I had no idea, I'll look into it for future reference.

My mom always thought getting a cat declawed was like "removing a fingernail on a person". She knows exactly what they do now, and feels guilty about it, but she just refuses to have a cat with claws. I'll definitely pass the technique on to some of those types of people.

Like I said before, a declawed cat with a home is much better than a homeless cat with claws! Some people will only keep declawed cats...
 

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I believe that where there is love for a pet there is patience to train them not to destroy or hurt other pets. We can rely on each other's experiences and learn how to do it. Since declawing is such a traumatic and painful experience I believe we should all opt for not doing it at all.
I am not judgemental of anybody here that has already declawed their pets. Hadn't I come to this forum to find out information about the outcome of declawing - I and my kitty might have been victims of the terrible process also.
I understand that when we want for our pet to be an indoor kitty we feel more "at ease" with declawing. But my point is that we cannot guarantee that the pet will always be inside. Accidents happen -Here is what happen to me - I was terrified to death when my brother-in-law did not pay attention and let Frosty out. Luckily he caught him right away. That is one thing. Plus what if something happened to me & my family? Nothing is sure in this world - then I would like for Frosty, even if on his own, to at least have a good defense system.
 

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i've always been of the mind that if you can't handle a cat with claws, you shouldn't have a cat. i understand there may be certain circumstances that require it, and i'm glad to hear there is a more humane way of performing the surgery.
 

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Before I knew what declawing involved, I looked into it for my little kitty. My aunt in America has her cat declawed (although that was over 12 years ago) I'm in Scotland and discovered that it is illegal here for a vet to perform the operation because it is seen as such a cruel act. I was delighted to find soft paws on the net and as soon as my baby is old enough I'll be using them. It'll be nice to have hands and arms that don't look like I've fell into a thorn push and had a wrestle! :)
 

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Well first, let me say, Laser Declawing is in no way a painful or traumatic experience. MyDrizzle? He had removed the bandage (a precaution) and was walking on his newly declawed paw within hours. If he'd been awake sooner, he'd have walked on it sooner. I agree, as does my Sis who unfortunately had it done to Boo and regrets it, that the use of Blades to perform this surgery is barbaric. If it is going to be done, spend the money on a laser. No pain. No trauma. No sadness. I have seen what blades cause emotionally and physically, and seen the results of lasers. Lasers do not to any ill after effects. If the use and availability of lasers had been known for Boo, she, too, would have been blessed with that.

Now, having said that, I don't think any cat *needs* to be declawed. If you have small children in the house, if they are indoors and never to go outside even by accident, if the cat is very tempermental, if one cat is hurting another, those are reasons to *consider* it. If you do so, use a laser.

Truly, I think everyone needs to step back and try not to see this dilemma from only their own point of view. If someone does not feel secure in having an animal with sharp claws around an infant, toddler, or elementary school child, is it not better for the animal to simly loose the claws then go homeless? If the animal is injuring a person, or another animal, and nothing can stop that be removing the "weapons" - is that not a better solution than continued harm?

Having Boo declawed was likely a mistake. The method - blades - no doubt a mistake. One that my sister regrets daily. But once done, it was done. Then Drizzle required it to prevent him from injuring Boo. Would you have left him to continue clawing at her when she no longer had that capability through circumstance?

I hope people will step back and try to think of this not from thier belief, but of each situation. Do I think de-clawing a bad thing? With blades, yes. With lasers, not as much, as I've seen first hand no ill effects, no pain, no misery. Does that mean that in (god willing) 40 years when Drizzle and Boo are gone and I get new cats, that they will be declawed? Unlikely. They likely will keep thier claws. But that's the future and that's a new situation. This is now and the past and a different situation.
 

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MrPurryMotors, under no circomstance am I judging your choice. I could have easily been in your place. As I have said - coming to this forum opened my eyes on this matter. I did not find the time to look it up but there are old posts debating on this subject.
Well here they are
http://www.catforum.com/viewtopic.php?t ... =declawing
http://www.catforum.com/viewtopic.php?t ... ng&start=0

Please read with an open mind - this is where I learned from for I had no clue about declawing before I got Frosty - my first kitty. I understand it is a delicate subject but we need to look at it in a mature way - after all we only want the best for our kitties, don't we?
 

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I don't know - declawing just erks me. It's like modifying an animal for human comfort. I know there are good reason some people do it and such, but I know around here some vets won't do it. And in Europe it's illegal.

You also can never tell how a cat will react to the experience. Some cats are never the same afterward, as the cat has to relearn how to walk.
 

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I'm the one who started this topic and I appreciate everyone's responses and input. It seems everyone is against declawing. Here is what I'm faced with. My friend had a cat that had kittens. These kittens were either going to be taken to the shelter and put to sleep, dropped off at a farm to freeze to dealth in the winter, or be adopted by people that wanted them. I wanted to be able to help at least one of them so I asked my sister (I live in her house) if we could get one. She said it would have to be declawed eventually because she didn't want the house destroyed. So the problem is, I feel like I did good by rescuing Oliver and giving him a home, yet I feel I'll be the worst person on earth if I declaw him. So, I'm still undecided on everything! Grrrrrrrr.
 

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Years back I read in a magazine at the supermarket that declawing a cat is dangerous.... the surgery itself. Having a pet fixed is one thing but I don't think that declawing the cat is a good idea. Can the cat stay in your room when you're not home? Can you get another place or roommate?

It's kind of barbaric. I think. I know this doesn't help but if you're still undecided about what to do then it doesn't sound like this is something you want to do.
 

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Heather102180 said:
I'm the one who started this topic and I appreciate everyone's responses and input. It seems everyone is against declawing. Here is what I'm faced with. My friend had a cat that had kittens. These kittens were either going to be taken to the shelter and put to sleep, dropped off at a farm to freeze to dealth in the winter, or be adopted by people that wanted them. I wanted to be able to help at least one of them so I asked my sister (I live in her house) if we could get one. She said it would have to be declawed eventually because she didn't want the house destroyed. So the problem is, I feel like I did good by rescuing Oliver and giving him a home, yet I feel I'll be the worst person on earth if I declaw him. So, I'm still undecided on everything! Grrrrrrrr.
:cry: :evil: @ your "Friend" who's cat had the kittens. HOW EVIL, SHALLOW-HEARTED AND CALLUS CAN YOU BE!? OHH! I hope that person is no longer your friend now!! Dare I ask what happened to the other kittens?

As for Oliver: Everyone is anti-declawing. Even myself, who might sound pro-declawing. Everyone realizes declawing is a bad thing. But what I realize - and I believe everyone here, too, realizes - is that it is sometimes a nessascary evil.

If the choice is between your sister throwing the cat out, basically, and having it de-clawed to foster peace and comply with the original compromise for getting him, I don't think anyone here will tell you it's better to throw him out.

I would be curious to know something: Everyone here who very anti-declawing, do you base this opinion on the results/facts of BLADED de-clawing? Have you observed/read up on LASER declawing?

I've seen both, first hand. Laser does not have any ill effects. Is the cat changed? Yes - but that seems the result of the lack of sexual hormones by being spayed/neutered.

Heather102180: If you must get Oliver declawed, find and use a laser. It is more expensive - typically blades run 30-40 while lasers 120-130 - however, all the ill side effects of bladed declawing vanish in a puff of smoke with the lasers. If you must do it to keep Oliver, do not feel bad about it. You are saving him, loving him, and he knows this. He won't hate you. I know first hand. In fact, if anything, they get a bit more loveable to you - after spaying/neutering. I think they realize you took away all those hyper, odd feelings, hehe, and appreciate it.

If it must be done, use a laser, and it must be done. Don't feel bad that your keeping him safe, happy, fed, and loved, just because you have to do something like that.
 

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Well this friend of mine found the mother on Easter on a farm and took her in as her own, not realizing it was already pregnant with 4 babies. Thank God, she was lucky and found them all loving homes.

Anyways, Oliver was due for a shot and I took him in tonite and asked what his take was on declawing. He said if it needs to be done, then do it. And he said to do it when they are young (which Ollie is 5 months) because 99% of them never realize they are gone once they recover. He would recover for 2 days at the vet (because he'll be castrated too) and then he'll send Olli home with some pain killers. I think I might go ahead with it. He doesn't tear at the furniture too much but I'd rather have the declawing done when he's a baby, rather than a grown up.

(Let the posts begin about how I shouldn't be doing this to Oliver :( )

On a funny note, he is 4.5 months and should only weigh 4.5 lbs but he weighs 8.5 lbs! He's gonna be a biiiiiig cat! He only eats kitten food and I never feed him people food. He must have had a big daddy because the mother was very small. (Bye the way, Oliver is my avatar)
 

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Yes - please everyone let's not turn this into an arguement.

She does admit regret at considering the options, so please keep it civil. Not directing this at anyway - just a general statement for a topic which is offen heated.

Heather - I would look at it as only considering declawing as the absolute LAST thing you try. Stick it out for a bit and see how it goes. Of course there will be a learning curve, but my parents have had about 4 cats during my childhood, and NONE of them scratched the furniture. Of course there were minor problems, but they were resolved before the cats were full grown. Cats will learn to use scratching posts.
 
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