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Discussion Starter #1
We've had Evie our lovely two year old Ragdoll for three weeks now, and she's settled in well. But we're worried she may be lonely as she's never lived as an only cat before, infact she lived with over ten cats before! Both my boyfriend and I work full time, so Evie is alone from 8-4 everyday, she's an indoor cat. We're thinking about getting a second cat as a companion for her- but I have some concerns. Mainly being whether she'd accept another cat- I don't want to put her nose out of joint! She is used to being in a multicat household, so I don't know whether this means she'll be more likely to accept a pal? She's a two year old female, I've read variously bits of advice as to whether we should get a male or female companion cat, but I'd like some advice from people who have been there themselves! There is a two year old female Ragdoll I know is looking for a home...

Thank you
 

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If Evie has been accustomed to living in a multi-cat household, then the chances of her accepting another cat are higher. I would wait until after her spay to adopt another, since her being in heat could cause complications. As for male vs. female, you often have more trouble introducing two females than a male and a female...although there are many members here who introduced two females with no problems. So, I'd say just pick the cat you like.

I had a very difficult time introducing Muffs (a Ragdoll) to Abby (they're both females). It took three months of separation plus the assistance of a professional behaviorist. But, despite the initial difficult time, I'm really happy that I adopted Abby. She and Muffs are now best friends. You rarely see one without the other and they keep each other company when I'm at work. They can often be found chasing each other around the house and, when they've finished playing, they groom each other and snuggle together.

So, if you want and can afford a second cat, I say go for it! Keep us posted.
 

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I agree another cat will certainly keep Evie company and it will be less lonely for her during the day. Is it a correct assumption on my part to believe that Evie is already spayed? If not, that's the first thing that you should do.

Since Evie has been in a multi-cat household before, the easiest adjustment is always with a kitten, one between 3-1/2- 6 mos., before kitty gets into the bratty teenage months (7mos. - 13 mos.) These are general guidelines and may start earlier or last longer. Male or female? It really depends on Evie's temperament. Is she calm, placid, laid back, or shy, timid, high strung or somewhere in between? A kitten that's calm and laid back will likely adjust better to whatever Evie is like. If Evie's lacking in confidence a very dominant and bold kitty could be a problem. So you will need to spend time in talking to a breeder and observing kittens play with each other. Who's the bully and who gets along with everyone? If you get a kitten in a foster situation, you will get a better assessment of its personality than one in a large humane society or pet store where there may not be enough individual attention and handling where the animal just gets fed and cage cleaned. You need to spend at least a couple of hours handling and watching a prospective kitten playing and interacting with other kittens and adult cats to assess it's personality. Two or more visits are better than one to see if the behaviour is consistent. Good luck! and give us an update.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for your responses.

We've decided to speak to the breeder we got Evie from to see what she advises, so I'm just waiting for a call back. Evie is really quite laid back, we thought she'd be a shy cat, but she's really not anymore- she's all over us!

Evie is due to be spayed in 10 days time, so that won't be a problem. I've found a beautiful 6 month old male (neutered) Ragdoll who sounds perfect, but I'm holding off from calling his owner until I've spoken to the breeder. There's also a suitable 18 month Ragdoll girl, who sounds similiar in temperament to Evie. We'd only consider adopting a cat from someone who knows him/her well, as I'm too wary that a cat could be from a 'kitten farm'. I'll let you know what happens next!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Update: We have now adopted a second cat! She's a rather beautiful blue mitted tabby Ragdoll called Mitzy. She's 16 months old and absolutely huge! I couldn't believe it the first time I picked her up. She's come from an extremely loving home, where she lived with three other Ragdolls- one of which, an older Tom cat, didn't like her and use to bully her!

We're doing all the recommended tips of the 'safe room' where Mitzy is living, and introducing them slowly. They've both had a few hisses and growls, but nothing major thus far (we'll see how that pans out...). Evie is being an absolute angel, she seems a little taken aback, but she let Mitzy into 'her room' (my dressing room which Evie has staked as her territory) for a sniff and didn't even hiss! And she still met me at the door when I returned home from work, which was nice!

I'm now just waiting for a few fireworks while they establish who's boss! Mitzy is quite a lot bigger than Evie, but then it's usually the small one's who rule the roost!

Fingers crossed! Any advice greatly appreciated. Should I leave ignore them if they hiss or growl at one another? Or separate them? I've read that it's a feline way of establish the Alpha cat, but it's so scary to watch!
 

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Congratulations! Looking forward to seeing pictures of Mitzy.

However, I'm confused by your question. You ask if you should ignore their hissing/growling or separate them...yet you say Mitzy is in a safe room and you're introducing them slowly. So, if they're already separated, why do you ask if you should separate them? If they're simply hissing or growling on either side of the safe room door, then I would just ignore that.
 

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Also, you mentioned that Evie was to be spayed in 10 days' time, but it's now only three days later and you are introducing the new cat to her. Might you not wait another week to continue the introductions, after Evie has been spayed and comes home, so you avoid the complication of having a partial intro, then Evie being spayed, coming home smelling like the vet's office and perhaps being sore and a bit out of sorts anyway, to deal with the new cat?
 
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