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I have used for breaking bad habits, ie peeing on an expensive rug.

We now are expecting our first "human" child, and am considering using the PetSafe indoor system to isolate parts of my home. I don't having to keep our bedroom doors closed, and this looks like a good option.

Again, I've had good luck with the old wired systems. Now the collars are a little smaller, and am willing to pay.

Your opinions are welcome!

Dave
 

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Shock collars are cruel for any animal. They can make the animal neurotic (increasing the chances of peeing all over the place), and they can malfunction. Last week I saw photos of a dog whose collar had "malfunctioned" and cause horrific burns up and down his neck. I can't even imagine using one on a cat. Shock collars are usually used to provide a quick fix to a problem that *should* be solved using patient, humane training but for the unwillingness of the owner to provide it.

If your cat is having litterbox problems, it's best to discover the cause (which requires a thorough exam and urinalysis by your vet) and get it resolved now before your 'new arrival'! Then it won't be an issue.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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I agree, NO shock collars for cats-I won't even use them on dogs!! I have a remote training collar for my dog that sprays Citronella to correct her, but I'd NEVER use a shock collar on any animal, it just causes more behavioral problems-they can be a useful training tool for some people who are working with a behavioral trainer, but they should NEVER NEVER NEVER be used by an inexperianced owner.
 

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Shock collars are bad, even though they state they are "humane".

It's worse than punishing via hitting, as the punishement comes from no where and can be extremely confusing for said animal if they don't know where it came from/what exactly they did wrong. I'm not saying hitting is good - I mean that's looked at is very wrong and this is even worse.

A lot of people like to punish without thinking about the animal. The animal has to know what it has done that is bad, and I lot of people punish when the animal may not know what it's being punished for. And punishing doesn't have to involve physical pain, but can just be scolding, or rewarding when the animal pees in the right place.
 

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Here's an alternative idea that I've found pretty effective for my cats. There's a product on the market called Ssscat or something like that. You set it up next to the door of a room you want to keep the cat out of, and when the cat tries to enter there's a motion senser that senses the cat, and it lets off a hissing sound, which usually scares the cat off and they usually learn pretty fast that the room is off limits.
 

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dude dont get a shock collar!!!!!!!! thats not cool.

you gotta understand ... owning a cat... you gotta put up with some crazy stuff that they do. its just what they do. shocking them and cagin them defeats the purpose of having a pet!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

but thats just me. i let my cat do anything he pleases that wont harm him. if he jumps on the table while i am eating what can i do? i just gently put him down and ask him to not do it again. he usually does but after about 3-4 times putting him down he gets the point and stops!
 

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Gracie's Mom said:
Here's an alternative idea that I've found pretty effective for my cats. There's a product on the market called Ssscat or something like that. You set it up next to the door of a room you want to keep the cat out of, and when the cat tries to enter there's a motion senser that senses the cat, and it lets off a hissing sound, which usually scares the cat off and they usually learn pretty fast that the room is off limits.
What a great idea! Of course animals will obey and respond to things they are used to. And instead of some confusing invisible source, use something that associates what could be a threat in off limits areas.

Of course this won't ALWAYS work, but I like this way of thinking.
 

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The hissing thing obviously doesn't hurt the cat physically -- but don't you think that also might be a bit traumatizing for a cat? Hearing another cat being territorial in *their* house? Kind of like a kid thinking there's a monster in their closet that they can never see. Just a thought.

y2k -- so you already have the shock collar that you used? Or have just used them in the past. Did you do it with a dog? Not a good idea for a cat -- I'll tell you that. Dogs are motivated to behave by totally different things than cats are. There are tons of ways to train a dog -- and one way to train a cat...patience, trust, and kindness. Their bodies just aren't made to handle things like shock collars. It will shock their nerves is what it will do, and damage their trust forever. Cats *are* trainable. If you'd train the cat the right way, you'd not only avoid having a skittish, frustrated animal living with you who could be a potential danger because they can't relax, but you'd gain a perfect companion for your new addition. What you want to work for is trust in your cat.
 

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I agree with ForJazz. I don't think it is fair to discipline a cat with fear, or any animal for that matter. I think it would be far better to use positive reinforcement of good behaviour rather than using fear or pain to reprimand bad behaviour.
 
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