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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading all I can find on hyperthyroidism but I find discrepancies in what I read. Can a hyperthy cat have iodine? Most things I read says to be sure the cat gets plenty of iodine, but the Science Diet YD food has less iodine. A human with HyperT is not to eat high iodine foods & people with lowT is to have more iodine. I'm really confused. Does anyone know for sure whether HT should have more or less iodine? I would like to get my kitty on the right food. thanks.
 

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the y/d diet works due to the fact that it is very low in iodine. if you are using the y/d it is crucial that your cat eats nothing other than the y/d, including many supplements. since other foods contain iodine the y/d will not be effective. it is also important that other cats you may have do not eat this food since it is too low in iodine for a healthy cat.


the y/d does the job at controlling the disease. my boy Morriss (RIP 12/6/11) was not able to take methimazole so we tried the y/d as soon as it was available and by the first month of him eating y/d his hyper-t was back to within normal ranges.
 

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There is a lot of controversy around the Y/D food in the hyperthyroid community. While it may control the thyroid function initially there is apparently no data on the long term effects of the low iodine to other bodily functions beside the thyroid. In addition, there is absolutely no meat in this food...cats are obligate carnivores and need animal protein.

I see this food as a significant risk to a cat's overall health. Maggie was diagnosed with hyper-t in December and I did not even consider this food as a possible method of treatment.

In your other thread you mention that you've read that the treatment for hyper-t is worse than the disease...in my research I never ran into anything that suggested that at all. There is extensive data regarding treatment with methimazole, carbimazole and/or radioactive iodine treatment.

If the drugs are chosen, starting with a low dose and bringing it up slowly will help minimize side effects. Using transdermal gel instead of oral meds will help even more to prevent digestive issues.

Maggie's thyroid number was off the charts. Started her on transdermal gel at 1.875mg twice a day, in two week her number was measurable (6). Upped her dose to 3.75 twice a day and two weeks later she was in the normal range (1.8). No side effects at all. I have switched her to methimazole compounded into treats (3.75mg) that she gets each morning and night. No side effects since making the switch. She's scheduled for a blood test next week and if her kidney numbers are good (which they are expected to be based on the data so far), I'll be scheduling her for radioactive iodine treatment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks very much for all your help. I want to be sure I know as much about this subject as possible before talking to the vet.
 

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Once you join the hyperT mailing list, you'll be able to access the searchable message archive so you can look up specific topics of interest. Also, you'll be able to access the files and databases stored on the group website. LOTS on information there.

Laurie
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks! I'm disappointed in the "Senior" Science Diet canned food. I've been reading labels & it contains iodized salt. Why would they add salt to senior food? Even if they weren't hyperT I wouldn't think they needed salt because of other problems it aggravates. I'm glad I've been preparing most of my cats food lately.
 
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