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Discussion Starter #1
I've been presented with a wonderful opportunity of getting another cat - HOWEVER this cat has never been to the vet - no shots - not spayed - nothing - she is three years old - my question to you all is - is it safe to bring her home to Tuffy not having had any shots? If she has worms or something will Tuffy get them? I would hate to put Tuffy in any kind of danger -- any answers would be much appreciated! Thanks in advance - Jan
 

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Cats need annual checkups one way or another.

Bring the cat in, have it checked for health, and I would imagine that the veterinarian would want to get the cat vaccinated, and it would be the responsible thing to do to have her fixed. There is no guarantee after all that the kitty couldn't get out at some point, and we already have such a problem with feline overpopulation.

Up to you, but thats the responsible thing to do IMO and there are low cost clinics available. Grats either way, and be sure to read on the cat-introduction threads, lots of cool info I learned from em! :)
 

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If she has never been to the vet, I would have them separated until she is checked by your vet at the very least. They will check her for anything that looks odd (skin conditions - rashes, fungi, bacterial parasites, flease, ticks, etc.), URI's, etc.), but they will also vaccinate her.

If you just let them mingle and don't isolate the new cat before being examined, you could expose Tuffy to all sorts or diseases and parasites (some are actually fatal), including Feline AIDS, Leukemia, etc...you just never know. Some animals are carriers and never exhibit symptoms so it's wise to keep them separate until the new cat gets a fresh bill of health and yes, spaying or neutering should not even be a question. The initial vet visit might be a little steep money wise, but it will be well worth it to protect the health of both cats.
 

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If cost is a concern, and I can definitely understand that if it is in this crap economy, this link might be helpful: ASPCA | Free and Low-Cost Spay/Neuter Database I believe for low cost clinics here its about $30. I saw a sign up recently for $10 vaccinations as well. A general health checkup at my vet is $50. Under a benjamin total, which would be way cheaper than inadvertently transferring something to Mr Tuffy. BTW, I assume the new kitty was kept indoors only?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oh I am 100% certain I would get the cat neutered - I was just wondering if I'm not putting Tuffy at risk...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We live in a trailer so don't have alot of room to keep two cats separate -- that's another worry - maybe this just isn't the cat for me - and I so wanted it too. :(
 

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Oh I am 100% certain I would get the cat neutered - I was just wondering if I'm not putting Tuffy at risk...
No expert, but I was told that FIV/FLV are the big ones to worry about. Kittens can get it from mommy, but I would think there would have been some signs, but its such a biggie I'd err on the side of caution. If it was indoor only and you know the previous caretaker, then I'd think that fleas and intestinal parasites and the like would be a very low concern.
We live in a trailer so don't have alot of room to keep two cats separate -- that's another worry - maybe this just isn't the cat for me - and I so wanted it too. :sad:
My coworker kept his cat in his bathroom for like a month and it was content. They don't seem to mind small spaces as much. But if the two cats aren't the ultimate best of friends, a trailer, depending on the size, might not be enough for them to have their own territory.
 

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Jan Rebecca - IMO, it's not an issue of if this is the cat for you. With any cat you bring in, unless you have a medical history for that particular cat which shows that the cat has tested negative for FIV/FLV, FIP, it will be the same issues you will need to deal with. It seems to me, it may not be the most functional arrangement if you live in a small place and can't keep the cats separate. You may want to consider maybe having a friend or family member keep the new cat for you until it's health has been checked and then you can bring it into your home once you know there is nothing to worry about. Another option is to adopt a pet from a shelter that runs these tests and spays as part of the adoption fee. They have lots of cats to choose from in all different stages (kittens, adults, etc.)

Good luck with your decision :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The reason I really really would like this cat is that it's a Bengal - it just seems too good to let go - ha! But my main concern is for Tuffy - I in no way want to bring anything home to him. The owner says if it doesnt' work out with Tuffy and the new cat - we can return her no problem - so that is not an issue.
 

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Is the current owner in a hurry to get rid of the cat?

Maybe you can leave it where it is for a few more days until you get the cat checked out just so you won't have the exposure to pathogens for Tuffy issue to contend with....just a suggestion. At least once you know the kitty is healthy, you can then work on the introduction process.
 

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look, for the intro they should be separated anyways in the beginning. SO while they are doing the whole getting to know you thing through the door and scents I would go ahead and get it checked out by a vet. just to be sure. I'd do that with any new cat indoor or no. because I never trust the other persons word
 

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Aren't most bengals hyperactive?

Might not be the best for a small environment anyway, especially if sharing, and you might come back and find your stuff all torn up if a very lively kitty gets bored.

How many square feet would the two be sharing?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hmm I can't say for sure what the exact square footage is - we live in a house trailer - not the small ones - the bigger size - and the cats would have full run of the house.
 

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Olivers-slave is right--the cats need to be separated at the beginning anyway for the introduction process--it's never a good idea to just throw a new cat in the mix without a slow introduction. Yes, Mr. Tuffy does have a risk of catching something from the new cat. I would keep the new cat separated until you can take it to the vet for its vaccines and spaying, and after you do a gradual introduction.
 

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Hi Jan Rebecca,

Good luck with whatever you decide; I just wanted to echo some of the sentiments here.

Regardless, when you are bringing a new cat or kitten into your home, there are certain things that need to be checked for. Feline AIDS and Feline Leukemia must be ruled out (a blood test must be administered and you need to know that the cat is negative for both). A fecal test must be done and all of the usual suspects such as roundworms, hookworms, etc. must be ruled out. Because a lot of them aren't so easy to spot, they may not be found on the first fecal; this is why you do want to do repeat fecals even on indoor-only cats because you can track things from outdoors to indoors on your shoes.

Also, and I bring this up because this is a Bengal, things like Trich which require a special test (but if this is an older Bengal and she isn't exhibiting diarrhea it will be hard to get a stool sample for Trich, since the stool sample should show diarrhea), Tritrichomonas foetus and giarrdia should be ruled out. The Bengal could be a carrier of T. foetus even though she has no diarrhea and pass it to your cat but you have no way of knowing this unless your cat presents with diarrhea later. If you want to know more about it, you can google for it. Here is a link: TFFelines.com - What is T.F.? Giarrdia is another trickier parasite to diagnose. It initially causes diarrhea but it can come back again and again in Bengals. I don't know much about it, though. Apparently there are some forms that are resistant and hard to get rid of. It is typically treated with metranidazole.

Then there are skin mites. I mention this because I currently have a Bengal kitten I got from a breeder who blessed me with Demodex mites and Tritrichomonas foetus, apparently neither of which she knows she has at her cattery.

Skin mites are hard to diagnose but they produce intense itchiness and scratching.

Some Bengal cats don't play well with others, as in, they like to be the dominant Alpha cat, they may not want to share their human, and they may not like being introduced to new cats. Not saying yours will mind. Mine did mind when I first introduced her to her new Siamese friend. She tried to "kill" her, as in lunge at her and take her out. Luckily her new friend was inside a carrier at the time.:? Anyway, she was a young four months and thankfully the introduction process only took five days, but she still doesn't like my older cat (a senior) which is causing problems in my household.

So yes, things can be transferred to your resident cat. It is much less expensive (and traumatic) to just have to treat the newcomer than to have to treat both cats. The treatment my cats will have to undergo for Demodex mites is a lyme sulfur dip once a week for six weeks. Now I have to try to keep T. foetus under control, and it is very hard to contain.

Signs of mites can range from obvious to subtle. Obvious scratching, itching, hair loss. The scratching may be mild at first and resemble scratching like they might scratch at a flea. So don't ignore even mild scratching. If they don't respond to flea medication, mites are worth considering.

Good luck and I hope kitty checks out okay!:kittyturn
 

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My concerns are the same as Ducman69. Cat may be FIV/FLV positive. Also Bengals are very active cats and I really don't think a trailer is a big enough space for an active Bengal.
It's your decision, but if I were i your shoes I'd pass on the offer.
 

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As for the space issue, I've had two Bengals in LESS than 600sq/ft as long as they have plenty of places to hide and climb this shouldn't be an issue.

When I got Leo, I kept him in the bathroom for about 3-4 weeks until I could get him neutered and vetted and to give him time to recover. He did fine, Although I did have to take everything out of my vanity under the sink because he climbed his way into the cabinet and nestled down into one of the drawers.
 
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