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I found some older music of mine tonight that I haven't listen to in a while so I popped it in the player. The whole CD is fine until the last 2 tracks. It skipped off and on from the end of the 19th track to about halfway through the 20th. The skipping was never so harsh that it made the player completely quit, so is there a fix for this type of thing?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
catnip said:
my son has a device that is used to resurface discs, it looks like a small handheld player with a crank on it, I have no idea what its called.
I just called Best Buy and they have them! It's called The Skip Doctor (figures :lol: ). Yay!
 

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It depends whether it's due to a scratch (yes) or a delamination (no). That's the dirty little secret of compact discs, which when they came out were expected to have an indefinite lifespan. But many older compact disks are delaminating, or the layers making up the disc are separating, and when that happens, they're done for. If I remember right, this problem first started cropping up about 15 years ago, so any discs older than that are suspect.
 

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I've had this problem to many times so I've come up with a solution.

When I purchase a cd I come home and burn it to my computer. Once the burning is compete ill burn it to a blank disk and put the original back in the case and into a place where i have all my originals.

If I loose or scratch the burned copy, i'll just burn another from the PC since the files are already there. I also store all my music on external hard drive with my movies and photos -- about 15,000 tracks too.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
coaster said:
It depends whether it's due to a scratch (yes) or a delamination (no). That's the dirty little secret of compact discs, which when they came out were expected to have an indefinite lifespan. But many older compact disks are delaminating, or the layers making up the disc are separating, and when that happens, they're done for. If I remember right, this problem first started cropping up about 15 years ago, so any discs older than that are suspect.
That's good to know, Tim. However, I don't believe delamination is the problem here. The CD I'm talking about is approximately 9 years old and it was last played about 4 years ago. Honestly, I think I scratched the darn thing last night as I was holding 2 CDs in my hand trying to find the cases they belong too; I remember one CD scraping the other.
 

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Sorry I did not reply earlier Jo, but if you have some liquid silver polish, you can use that. Simply rub the silver polish into the scratch radially. I fixed a CD for my father that way way back in 1985 based on an article from Stereo Review. Like the Skip Doctor tool, you are making a bunch of tiny scratches in lieu one one big one which the laser cannot penetrate.

Other solutions are clearcoat safe automotive polish and clearcoat safe rubbing compound. I used them for some smaller scratches with good results.

coaster said:
It depends whether it's due to a scratch (yes) or a delamination (no). That's the dirty little secret of compact discs, which when they came out were expected to have an indefinite lifespan. But many older compact disks are delaminating, or the layers making up the disc are separating, and when that happens, they're done for. If I remember right, this problem first started cropping up about 15 years ago, so any discs older than that are suspect.
Ya know what, Tim? My vinyl does not have that problem. Right this minute, I am listening to a 30+ year old vinyl record of Charley Pride's Christmas In My Home Town!!! And it sounds very good! Only clicking and popping is in the lead-in groove but by heavy duty vinyl cleaners will take that right away. The highs from cymbals, bells, piccolos, etc are still clean and crisp. CDs having better sound quality and longevity indeed...
 

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They sound better if you don't have the time, expertise or money to constantly be cleaning the crud out of the groove :D

Having said that, my dad has a great setup, and his records (LPs?) do sound amazing.

Now cassettes were a big waste of time and effort :lol:
 

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Huge said:
They sound better if you don't have the time, expertise or money to constantly be cleaning the crud out of the groove :D
ONLY if you allow them to get dirty, Hugh. Take good care of them from the start and they will never get cruddy. This record will need a good cleaning since it sat unplayed for well over 20 years. But once cleaned, I have a carbon fibre bristle dry brush that brushes each side before play. I also have various stylus cleaners as well

Having said that, my dad has a great setup, and his records (LPs?) do sound amazing.
I have always said analog still sounds the best if you have the proper equipment.

Now cassettes were a big waste of time and effort :lol:
I would give that honor to the 8-track. But...remember open reel? I can still remember Hugh when the record clubs over here such as Columbia House still offered recordings on reel to reel format. In the 70s, I still remember some record stores selling open reel albums.
 

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:lol: :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Donaldjr1969 said:
Jo, any luck restoring your CD???
I'm not going to attempt anything myself so I'm gonna get one of those Skip Doctors. It will have to wait a couple days, though because we've had about 6 inches of snow today and the wind is supposed to be horrendous sometime tonight, causing blizzard conditions.
 

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2kids3cats4me said:
Donaldjr1969 said:
Jo, any luck restoring your CD???
I'm not going to attempt anything myself so I'm gonna get one of those Skip Doctors. It will have to wait a couple days, though because we've had about 6 inches of snow today and the wind is supposed to be horrendous sometime tonight, causing blizzard conditions.
Jo, you give yourself far less credit than you deserve. I KNOW you can fix a CD. Also, if this CD still skips even after giving it a good cleaning with a mild cleaner like windex or glass plus, then it is no big deal attempting a restore. After all, it is not playing properly as it is. If it is a big enough annoyance to you, then would you lose much if you somehow were unsuccessful in a restore?

Personally CD makers should consider a more abrasion resistant material for the top coat of a CD. It sure would make for a lot less ruined CDs.
 

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Fingers crossed that your CD's come out alright, Jo. :)

I remember reading in an electronics trade publication many years ago that a manufacturer was studying the feasibility of making archive-quality CD's using glass laminated onto a metal disc.
I guess that idea never was practical.
 

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gunterkat said:
I remember reading in an electronics trade publication many years ago that a manufacturer was studying the feasibility of making archive-quality CD's using glass laminated onto a metal disc.
I guess that idea never was practical.
They would probably be as sturdy as those old Bakelite 78's of years past.

Polycarbonate is not one of the most abrasion resistant materials out there. And the lacquer coating is even worse. If Delrin, or other acetal compounds were available in clear grade, THAT would be the plastic to use to encase the disc itself.
 

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Donaldjr1969 said:
Ya know what, Tim? My vinyl does not have that problem.
I think history will show that the most durable storage media are paper, for words and pictures, and vinyl, for audio. Pretty much anything is better than magnetic media.
 
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