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My sister came to visit me from the U.S. for a few months and she brought her two cats, one is 7 and the other is a year old. My 4 month old kitten gets along really well with the younger cat. She basically grew up with my sisters cats. The younger cat will sometimes groom her and they play a lot and snuggle with each other. Unfortunately, my sister is returning next week to the U.S. along with her cats. How can I help my kitten adjust after her friends are gone?
 

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Your cat is really quite young, the perfect age to add a playmate. Do you have any interest in adding another kitty to your household? There's really nothing you can do to prepare for the other cats leaving except maybe giving your cat extra attention and play time after they're gone. She may be just fine and love being the only cat.
 

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Yes. I am actually planning to adopt another kitten. It is not the practice to spay/neuter cats & kittens here so if I do decide to adopt I'll have to go through another traumatizing bout of spaying/neutering. But, it will be worth it. So would it be okay to get a male kitten that hasn't been neutered? My current kitten is a female spayed three weeks ago.
 

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If you get an unneutered male, you'll have to get him fixed immediately. Some cats can get pregnant as young as four months old. Getting kittens fixed shouldn't be a traumatizing experience.
 

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dodo24- I believe there are social benefits to neutering a male like not spraying your house, being more mellow, not trying to mount your spayed female and annoying the heck out of her. I hope others will adjust my information if I don't have those points correct.
 

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If you get an unneutered male, you'll have to get him fixed immediately. Some cats can get pregnant as young as four months old. Getting kittens fixed shouldn't be a traumatizing experience.
I did read that and was worried about my female kitten. The practice in my country is to spay cats when they're 6-7 months old or only after they've sexually matured. Took a lot of convincing for me to get my 4 month old female kitten spayed. I had to take her back to the vet everyday for 6-7 days to get antibiotic shots, and spray on really strong smelling, fur-staining antibiotic spray, and apply bandages and ointments etc... Since my kitten had external sutures and had to go through all of that, I couldn't relate to all the things I read online about the female spaying process. Also, I had to keep the cone on her for at least 18 days!!! I'm just ranting right now (sorry & thanks for reading), but it was so stressful!! My kitten got really sick too and started throwing up for a whole day during this whole process. I felt so bad for her all the time. But now she's doing great ( except for her eyes which is a separate issue).
With the whole process I just wish I could adopt a spayed/neutered kitten but that's kind of an absurd concept here in my home country. :( Fixing male kittens is a shorter process I heard so that's why I prefer a male.
 

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dodo24- I believe there are social benefits to neutering a male like not spraying your house, being more mellow, not trying to mount your spayed female and annoying the heck out of her. I hope others will adjust my information if I don't have those points correct.

If I got a male, I would definitely neuter him. I'd just need some time to prepare myself mentally for the procedure and I would also need to prepare my home for a new kitten!
 

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dodo24 - sorry I did not respond. I am getting the hang of using and monitoring this site.

Anyhow, so sorry you had such a difficult time with your girl's spaying. I am now at having owned 5 cats. The first three the cats were spayed while I owned them and remember no difficulties (2 female and 1 male at maturity). Same for my daughter's two cats. My latest two were from shelters and both came spayed and neutered. If I recall with my daughter's two, the male was much easier than the female and they were spay/neutered at around the 6 months. The male at that point had started to get bright ideas about his sister and continued to try and mount her after he was neutered. It was the turning point of their cuddly relationship. They still turn to each other for general company by do not share sleep surfaced.

I know there are debates about the benefit of waiting until maturity and I would address that topic with your vet.
 
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