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Discussion Starter #1
I've noticed that dry adult cat food seems to be lower in protein content than dry kitten food.
Would you not want to have a high protein content for an adult cat as well, not just kittens?
And in that case, would it be detrimental to feed an adult cat a dry food meant for kittens that was high in protein eg 37%?
 

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If you had a pregnant female, kitten food would be a good idea. I would keep a kitten on it for 8-8 months and then feed a good quality dry food. You can offer canned food as a treat.
 

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I've heard of people feeding kitten food to an adult cat as a weight loss plan. It's basically the same concept as the Atkins diet.
 

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The only time I would fees an adult cat kitten food would be if the cat was pregnant OR underweight. Otherwise kitten food is way to fat and contains way to much protein for an adult. Kitten food is often to fat even for kittens!

An active adult cat doesn't need as much protein as 37%, 27% is more normal for an adult. Why do you wanna feed your cat high protein food? Is there a special reason for it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was just curious as to why it was so much lower than kitten food - in our human society everybody stresses high protein, so I was wondering how that might translate to cat food.
 

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Pepe&Penelope said:
I was just curious as to why it was so much lower than kitten food - in our human society everybody stresses high protein, so I was wondering how that might translate to cat food.
Actuarally not even kittens really need that much protein. A kitten (betweem the age of 3 and 6 months) only needs 30% of the food to be protein but a little bit extra won't do any harm, mostly. Kitten food contains more fat and protein because they're growing youngsters and they need more protein than adults (they don't really need more fat than adults but the food manufacturers seems to think soo).
 

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Your adult cat should have no less then 30% protein in their daily diet, and that only counts if it comes from good quality protein sources! So if your feeding a not so great brand, and the protein says 30% chances are they are not getting enough of the right kind of protein.

There is no harm in giving cats adults and kittens a diet with as much as up to 36% protein provided that, as I said. It comes from a proper protein source, cats are carnivors, lets remember this. So there is a lot of protein in a cats diet requirments.

A high protein diet such as 34% protein + should only be fed as a treat or occasionally during specific times such as pregnacy or illness. And it is also proper for young kittens during their large period of growth 7 weeks - 5 or 6 months. And then slowly work down to a lower protein diet of 30%-34% be it another kitten or kitten/adult cat food. Some cat foods are made for both kittens and cats in the one formula.
 

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I have been feeding my cats a mixture of adult cat food and kitten chow (Nutro) for a couple months. I do this because the cats will eat all the kittens food and they dont get any. This was all the cats are eating the same food. I dont know if this is a good idea or not....my cats arent over eaters so I dont worry they will eat to much. None of them are fat at all, only healthy weight. (Minnie is even a tad skinny, although I think its just her body type.)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I feed a mixture of Go! Natural (for all life stages) at 32% protein and Evolve (kitten) at 37% protein to both kitties, who are about 7 months. They also share a can of Wellness twice a week. Should I stop the Evolve and continue on with the Go! or can I feed both indefinately?
 

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Im currently feeding California Natural to my adults which has 36.5% protein.
Kittens need more protein for growth but they also need a calorie dense diet which is why there are often higher amounts of fat in kitten foods....fat increases the calorie content.
 

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AngelZoo said:
Your adult cat should have no less then 30% protein in their daily diet, and that only counts if it comes from good quality protein sources! So if your feeding a not so great brand, and the protein says 30% chances are they are not getting enough of the right kind of protein.

There is no harm in giving cats adults and kittens a diet with as much as up to 36% protein provided that, as I said. It comes from a proper protein source, cats are carnivors, lets remember this. So there is a lot of protein in a cats diet requirments.

A high protein diet such as 34% protein + should only be fed as a treat or occasionally during specific times such as pregnacy or illness. And it is also proper for young kittens during their large period of growth 7 weeks - 5 or 6 months. And then slowly work down to a lower protein diet of 30%-34% be it another kitten or kitten/adult cat food. Some cat foods are made for both kittens and cats in the one formula.
I guess different numbers goes for differnet countries. The Swedish department of agriculture recommends no less than 26% of protein in an adult cats daily diet. :) 30% for growing or pregnant cats.
 
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