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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I will hopefully be getting a pair of Sphynx kittens soon, if not at the beginning of December then hopefully soon thereafter. It has been awhile since I have had a kitten, not as long since a puppy, but I know a kitten is an entirely different ballgame and I want to be ready. What advice do you have that should not be forgotten? Or any tips that you hadn't heard anywhere else that you could share? Anything and everything pre kitten arrival that you think I should do, I would love to hear. I like to be very thorough when I do things.

Also, I have a few concerns and want to know what other people do about them. The first is cords. While I do not have an excessive amount of exposed cords, I do live in the modern world and make use of various electronics. Are kittens prone to chewing cords? Does that mean they could be shocked when I am out and not supervising? I have read spraying them with bitter apple, but does anyone else have a suggestion?

Anything kitten related you want to share from stories to advice, I am ready to hear it! Thanks :D
 

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My first two cats didnt care about coords at all. But Max is a different story, he is amazed at what is behind the TV and computer, and he likes outlets, so I went to the babystore and got plastic plugs for all outlets that have nothing plugged into them. I went to home depo and got some very cheap flexible kinda tubbing that I put all my TV and computer cables through. He opens cabinets, so I got baby latches for that. He also figured out that my closet opens when he runs into it (has magenets) so I used a rubber band on the handles. He cant go behind the refrigerator anymore, so i removed the box i had put there to block his path. I also removed all plants cause they thought they were kitty litter containers. And I removed the plug in air freshners cause i was afraid that they would try to play with them and lick them. I never used the bitter stuff, but I did put some catnip spray on his kitty tower and he goes to that and scratches it. I think every cat is different, and two kittens will likely plan things better :)
Also kittens like to trip you on staircases. never carry laundry thinking he is behind you...
lots of luck
 

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Keep your floors clean. They are like toddlers and will try to eat any little thing left on the floor.
 

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When I brought Shepherd Book home I just made sure that the floors were picked up and the counters were kept clean.

Then I dealt with stuff as he got into it. He's a trash stealer (loves bits of paper) so I got covered trash cans in the bathroom/office.

When he first got to me he wasn't that great about personal hygiene so I put an old sheet over the bed where he liked to sit (So I wouldn't have to wash the little damp 'privates' print off my bedspread daily)...thankfully he's learned to groom himself.

He knocks over ANYTHING on my bedside table so I cleared it off until he learns that "NO!" really does mean "NO!". (we're @ about 80% of the time on that)

One good thing..... if there's anything small enough for him to carry that I've lost (batteries, pen caps, toothpaste lids...etc) he'll find it! :wink

Note: Wondercat is right, practice your kitten shuffle now. Walking in a shuffling gate where your feet only come about 1/4 an inch off the ground and the steps are freakishly long to push small furry bodies out of your way as you walk.
 

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wondercat has given some great suggestions. I would add that anything like string, thread, dental floss (yes they will find it in the bathroom waste basket), ribbon, elastics if ingested could cause intestinal blockage which is an expen$ive surgery. My girl Alkee has a thing for chewing shoelaces. So far I've been lucky but she chewed off one of my hubby's shoes recently and it was in her stomach for 10 days before she barfed it up. Occasionally she has passed one. So I have to be vigilant about any shoes with laces being put away. She learned to open our sliding door in our foyer to get at shoes, so now we have to put a stick in it. When she was teething she liked to chew wires, and I found the Bitter Apple sprayed on them deterred her from that. A cardboard box makes a good teether.

Also, any little things that could be swallowed should not be left on floors or tables or within their reach. Good luck!
 

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Oh I forgot, also be very careful on selecting where the litter box will be, when we moved into the new house I put it next to the boiler room, when the boiler came on it made a LOUD bang and it scared the kitties and made them get scared of their litter box... that was fun. And if you have blinds, tie ou the strings out of reach :).
 

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Kyra can open every single closet door in the apartment, so we have loop ties on all the doors. A piece of string with a loop tied at both ends of it, we put the loop over one door knob, loop it over the second knob(double sliding doors on every closet) and bring it back putting the second loop on the first knob. works like a charm. 8) I am terrified what bad habits Tucker will have as he grows. LOL

Oh, and if there is a peacock feather ANYWHERE in the apartment, she will find it. Even if it is in a Kyra proof closet. :p
 

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And if you have blinds, tie ou the strings out of reach :).

personally i would remove blinds with strings completely. I moved into a rental once when Sherbert was young, tied up the string to a good safe height. And one day walked in and found he had made a flying leap from a random piece of furniture and got tangled in the string, If it had not been wrapped around a leg as well as his neck, I would not have had a cat.. he was just hanging there.. scared the cr*p outta me.
 

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On the blinds; Kyra has destroyed many. So don't think the string is the only thing to worry about. She noms on the slats, bends them, whatever. They don't need a reason for these things, they are cats. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the advice, guys, some of the stories made me smile. Definitely writing this all down and committing it to memory.

Keep it coming if it is out there :)
 

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Lie on the floor in each room and look around. That's what your kittens will see, and you'll probably notice things you never thought of that they can get into.
 

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I didn't really think about kitten proofing my apt until recently and I've had Milky for just over 2 months now.

He loves hiding in really awkward, difficult to reach places where I can't reach him, such a under the shoe cabinet, under the sofa (our sofa is slightly raised but he can somehow manoeuver himself in there and sometimes can't get back out), so any small or low areas, I've cellotaped up or used heavy items to block which he can't move.

He also loves jumping onto the dining table, so we've cleared that area completely so there's nothing for him to do when he gets up there!

He also enjoys diving behind our tv set into a bunch of cables, every sneaky chance he gets! We haven't kitten proofed our cables but he doesn't gnaw at them (much)anyway.

I usually give the floors a good wash once a week, just in case he does like licking things off the floor, it's not too dirty!

Hope that's some help.
 

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Kitten proofing is always a challenge. When I brought in a feral mom and her five kittens home, I kitten proofed one room and kept them in there for several weeks.

Things to think about.... Make sure that they cannot get near vertical blind cords, they can strangle themselves with these! I kept the verticle blinds opened and tied the cord to the top to prevent mishaps. I also laced the electrical cords with bitter apple, a product that can be bought at pet stores that cats hate the taste of. Tobasco sauce does something similar but it puts a bit of a sting into biting a cord. I found this worked best because the cats then just associated the cord with the discomfort of the hotsauce. Plastic covers for unused outlets are also a good idea and baby safety mechanisms for cupboards that contain toxic chemicals or medication is also a good option. Cats are surprisingly good at opening cupboards. I also removed breakables from all surfaces including dressers, table tops, shelves etc. I also secured book shelves to the walls as a safety incase the cats were to jump on them and tilt them forward. Plant pots were lined with tinfoil to keep the cats from digging in the soil (limited success with this one though) and I parted with all toxic plants in the house, keeping only those that would not cause problems if chewed on. I also made sure that they had plenty of safe toys to play with. String or most of the interactive toys (the ones you dangle for the kitty to chase) were locked up when I wasn't using them, again a choking and strangling hazard. Sewing basket was secured behind a door where they couldn't get into it since threads and needles are often accidentally swallowed by cats and can cause death if not surgically removed.

There are a lot of things to think about. Try keeping them in a single room that you have catproofed and let them out when they can be monitored. Believe me, I found a number of things I overlooked just by watching them and seeing what they were getting into!

Good luck!
 
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