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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just took in a stray kitten, and we're currently in the process of socializing with the existing three adult cats. No real fighting, just a lot of hissing and face swatting.

However, the kitten, Sophie, has a lump on her right side that we noticed about three weeks ago. I took her to the vet for her vaccinations and mentioned this. The vet gave her a thorough examination, poked and prodded the lump, announced that it probably was not a tumor, but said she wasn't sure what it was. I was advised to keep an eye on it and bring her back if it gets bigger.

Not satisfied with that response, I took her to another clinic and had a different vet examine her. He did the same, and said he thought it might be a hernia, perhaps caused by an injury of some kind, and I was again avised to keep an eye on it and bring her back if it gets bigger.

The lump is behid her rib cage on the right side, about the size of an acorn, and does not seem to bother her at all. She does not flinch or whine when its touched or pressed on, and plays normally and eats normally. She's probably at least part Siamese. She's white with what appear to be lilac points and brilliant blue eyes. Unfortunately, you can't see the lump in the picture from the way she's sitting.

Has anyone here experienced such a thing? I had a Yorkie once with a small hernia, but never a cat with one. Any thoughts or advice?
 

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If two vets aren't too concerned about it, I wouldn't be either. If the lump starts weeping, then I would be concerned that it is an abscess, but it sounds like it might be a cyst. Just keep checking it every day to see if there are any changes. As long as your kitten is eating well, it doesn't bother her, and is active, I wouldn't be concerned.

Sophie is a very beautiful kitty, lucky you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. She's a real cutie, and wants so badly to play with the adult cats. She side-hops up to them and rolls on the floor like she's inviting them to play, but they give her the cold shoulder. She's a ball of energy.
 

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If you're really concerned about this lump, I'd go to the vet and say "I'm uncomfortable with 'wait and see' and want a diagnosis on this lump. What tests do you recommend doing?" Then do them.

Callie had a lump on top of her head, the vet said "wait and see". The lump multiplied into 3 and turned out to be fibrosarcoma. I don't "wait and see" anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm taking her back in a couple of weeks to be spayed, and I'll see what kind of tests can be run on that lump then. Hopefully I can get a definite answer this time.
 

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Is the lump soft and can it be "reduced"? (Meaning you can push it in) If so, then it may be a hernia indeed. I don't like the "wait and see" philosophy either. If it is a hernia it runs the danger of occluding some internal organ and that is gonna lead to some big trouble for her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's soft, but the vet was unable to "push it in". I'll definitely have them take another look at it with some insistence on resolving it. She's such a sweet baby, and we've already gotten attached to her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
UPDATE:
While in for spaying today, the vet made a careful incision in the skin to explore the lump, and determined that it was indeed a hernia. Not a serious issue in her case, but I'm glad to know what it was and that she's going to be fine. She's waking up from the anesthesia now, and I'll get to bring her home this evening. She will talk to me more about it when I pick her up, but it's good to know that my baby's okay!
 
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