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Discussion Starter #1
We have an open TV stand in our living room and our kittens like to go to the back, where all the cords are for the TV, PVR, XBox, etc. I haven't really seen them playing with the cords, but we don't like them back there. Recently they've started bringing toys back there as well. I am worried they will start chewing the cables.

How can I teach them that area is not for kitties? I've tried taking them out and giving them a toy to play with, but I don't want them to associate going back there with play time. Lately, I've been saying No and carrying them out and making them sit on their scratch post. It kind of works, I guess. They don't immediately go back in. But the other night I was so fed up I sat right in front of the stand, to prevent the kitties from going in there. They just weren't listening.

Should I keep doing what I'm doing? Will they eventually learn? Is there anything I could put on the bottom shelf that might "repel" them from that area? Something that stinks of perfume or something? (One cat doesn't like the smell of soap on our hands)
 

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I've been having the same problem lately with my new kitten. He just loves chewing on any wire. I soaked a cloth in lemon jif and wiped the wire with it. I also placed the cloth behind the TV for a while. He hates the smell of the lemon jif. Runs away the second he smells it. Maybe if you place the cloth behind the TV they will quickly associate the going behind the TV with the smell.
 

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For whatever it's worth, Murphy bats toys under the TV stand all the time and goes back there to fish them out, and he has never tried to bite on the cords. It may not be something in his 'behavioral repertoire,' as they say.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
When they bring their toys back there they jump around and it just doesn't seem safe to me, even if they aren't chewing the cords. Plus, I don't want them to realize that the cords are something they can chew.

I've been having the same problem lately with my new kitten. He just loves chewing on any wire. I soaked a cloth in lemon jif and wiped the wire with it. I also placed the cloth behind the TV for a while. He hates the smell of the lemon jif. Runs away the second he smells it. Maybe if you place the cloth behind the TV they will quickly associate the going behind the TV with the smell.
I have some lemon scented Lysol wipes. Maybe I'll try putting a few of those inside and see if it works. They have quite a strong lemony smell. Thanks for the idea!
 

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I doubt the lysol wipes will work very well since the scent will disappear when the liquid evaporates. Maybe try putting some kind of citrus oil on a cloth and setting it back there instead. Any kind of citrus will do as most cats hate the smell. If that doesn't deter them, then I would suggest blocking the are off somehow.

You're right to be concerned about the wires. Its a hazard to your electronics if they can pull them down or off the shelf, but it can also be very dangerous to your cats if they were to chew on them. One of my cats is a cord chewer, so I hide all the cords. They're either contained within something, taped to the wall or hidden behind furniture.
 

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So far our cat has left any exposed wires alone. But she does like to chew plastic bags or bags that cloths come in from the cleaners. Been looking for a safe alternative for her to chew on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I tried the lysol wipes and they didn't work. I let them smell the wipe, and they clearly didn't like it. But I put a bunch on the shelf where they go in but they ust walked over it. They were fresh so they still had the scent.

I might just end up taping all the cords to the wall. It would look cleaner that way too.
 

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It's aversive, but I use Ssscat for really dangerous stuff (electronics - Xmas lights mostly). I figure it's better than an electrocuted cat... I'm not sure I would use it with kittens, but if it's a persistent problem as they age, it could be an option.
 
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