Cat Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We have a 9 month old, female cat. She is ½ Siamese and short haired. She was fixed a few months ago. She was originally a stray but is has been an indoor cat since she was very young. She looks very healthy, is energetic, and has an extremely good appetite.

She has had a diarrhea problem as long as we have had her (7 months). She was de-wormed at the vet when she was a kitten and they vet ran all of the normal tests for parasites which all came back negative. We feed her Wellness cat food but have tried other foods with no luck. Recently this problem as gotten worse and she has started having “accidents” on the floor. Usually we find a “deposit” in the corner of our basement. The litter box is located on the other side of the room. Does anyone know why a cat who never has had problems not using the litter box would decide to go on the floor when she has a diarrhea problem? She has only had these accidents when the problem is at its worse. The litter box is cleaned daily. One thing we’ve noticed with her is she has very bad gas.

We have another slightly older cat that has no similar problems. The two cats get along well.

We took her back to the vet last week and they ran all of the normal tests again. She tested negative again for parasites or worms but they put her on Panacur to make sure. After the Panacur treatment, the problem still persists. She had an accident again last night.

Has anyone run into similar symptoms with their cat? She seems and acts very healthy but I’m worried that this may be a symptom of a larger problem. Also having never ending diarrhea is not healthy.

Thank you for the help.

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Unfortunately, this is a somewhat common problem. Most diarrhea cases do respond to treatments with antibiotics and worm treatments. But in cases that don't, vets often look at food allergies. Your cat is on an excellent brand that normally doesn't cause stomach problems. However, if your cat is allergic to a certain ingredient in the food, stomach problems can occur.

Usually, a vet will suggest trying a chicken and rice formula, since these cause fewer allergic reactions than foods containing fish, corn, and beef. If the cat doesn't respond, a prescription allergy food may be in order. These use only one meat and one main source of carbs, usually ones that aren't used in most cat foods. Formulas may include venison, rabbit, lamb, peas, potatoes, etc. It takes about a good 6 weeks to determine if an allergy diet is working.

When these don't work, and no other cause of diarrhea is suspected, the cat is usually diagnosed with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). It's an ideopathic illness, meaning there's no known cause. It affects the bowel, obviously, which is the intestines, and once in a while, the stomach. It can affect both the large and small intestines, resulting in gas, vomiting, and/or diarrhea. Sometimes, it's so severe that weight loss occurs.

While an endoscopy or biopsy of the affected tissues are the only definite means of diagnosis, these are expensive and require the risk of anestheisa, so most vets do not go to this extent. Instead, they try treatments which have proven to be effective in most cases - that would be a sensitive stomach diet, antibiotics, wormers, and anti-inflammatory agents, like the steroid, Prednisone. Continued use of Prednisone is the most successful tool in the majority of cases. It can take months to reach its fullest effect. Cats with IBD normally have to be on the steroid for the rest of their lives, but once symptoms are controlled, the amount is generally reduced to the lowest dose possible, while still maintaining the results. In times of flair ups, which there always are, a raised dosage and antibiotics and wormers may be repeated.

Do talk to your doctor about further options with diet. I assume your vet has run a course of antibiotics such as Albon or metronidazole to help control any cases of coccidiosis, giardiosis, and bacterial infections, despite the negative fecal exam. If not, ask him about this. The antibiotics are very safe, so it's usually worth a shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,235 Posts
It's definitely not healthy to have a cat with constant diahrea, the idea of switching to another food may help with the problem, but I dont know what to tell you on advice as of what can stop it or what is wrong but I wish you luck on finding out whats wrong and hope your kitty gets better soon! :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
It could be giardiasis. This is not always found in stool testing because the little buggers arent always present in the stool.

Mine has this atm.. I am giving pills out the wazoo daily :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
My cat had a problem with off and on diarrhea for over a month. He had two parasite checks, both were negative. Finally, I ended up seeing tapeworms in his poop. These did not show up in the stool test and I also didn't see them in his stool until quite some time had gone by! He got meds for it and has been fine since. I would suggest talking to you vet about that possibility and check his stool for small white worms (usually can only see them soon after they poop) and check his butt because sometimes you can see them there also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,101 Posts
diarrhea

It would be highly unusual to see a food allergy or IBD in a cat so young. I would certainly be thinking of Giardia as was suggested. Giardia will not necessarily be found on a routine fecal; it requires a special flotation solution. Panacur works to some extent for this protozoal parasite, but you have to give it for 8 days, not the usual 3-5. No currently available drug has more than 70% success killing Giardia; many animals will become chronic carriers.

Giardia typically causes a mushy to runny stool, sometimes with mucus and/or blood, and the cat usually has to go *immediately* when the urge strikes, often right where they're standing. Hence, a lot of missed litterboxes. They can be horrendously gassy. This is much worse with a nice labrador, who can clear a room in 30 second! Oh, that was one I'll never forget! Poor dog just could not get out in time.

In vet school they hammered into us that stool samples must be centrifuged before they're floated, otherwise you miss 90% of the eggs and other critters. I have never known a clinic to actually do this in practice. So a negative fecal does not necessarily mean a whole lot, there could still be tons of bad guys in there.

If the symptoms fit Giardia, I've had great luck with a natural protocol for it and other intestinal parasites. It's kind of a pain to do, but no worse than trying to pill a cat! Get a digestive enzyme mix or even just protease (such as bromelain or papain). Open up the capsule and mix with a little water, and give orally by syringe 1 hour before each meal and at bedtime (so 3 times a day), for 8 days. Rest for 1 week, then repeat for 1 week. Of course, this requires feeding in meals and not leaving food out all the time. The idea is that the enzymes break down whatever they find in the gut if there isn't any food. We've cleared Giardia from mountain-stream-drinking dogs and even a whole cattery full of kittens.

Digestive enzymes given *with* food will also help the cat digest the food properly (in case there is a mild pancreatitis so the enzymes aren't there), and acidophilus will help re-balance the bacteria that may have been wiped out with previous drugs.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top