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I was wondering what other people do when their cats get too bad. For example, Stormy and Justin like to play fight. Every once in a while though, it escalates. They ended up with too much claws and teeth and fur flying, along with some hissing and some "Raar!" sounds that make it sound like REAL fighting. Hubby and I will say NO and STOP THAT, which will make them quit some of the time. But last night was one of the times it didn't. I took Stormy (she was still trying to lunge at Justin when I picked her up) and put her in the bedroom. Hubby took Justin and put him in the bathroom. There they stayed in their "separate corners" for 5 minutes. When we let them out again we asked them to play nice and everything was fine. Then when I feel asleep they were back to their usual sweetness...cuddled up together asleep with their heads nestled against the other's. So cute.
So my question is...do other people use kitty time out? And is it effective in getting the message across? (Stop fighting like that) If not, what else do you do?
 

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Time-outs can be very effective when used properly; just separate the combatants gently and without judgment or anger (which they would not understand).

With my gang, I notice that the normal small skirmishes escalate dramatically if I forget to put flower essences in their water. So the essences are preventing a lot of problems in my house!

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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Normally yelling and pointing a firm finger at them almost in their face gets the point across. At times we've done what you did - physically moved them apart. It's never gotten so bad where they had to be put behind closed doors, though - it's normally my oldest being a bully and constantly cornering our newest, scaring her.
 

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I allow my kittens to jump on my counters when I'm not in the kitchen. Face it, they're going to do it anyway when I'm not around. They know, however, that when I'm in the kitchen working, the counters are off-limits. That doesn't mean they don't sometimes test me, once they jump up there when I'm busy, a firm "DOWN" and they hop off. Sometimes though, the little one forgets what DOWN means. He gets two warnings and physical removal, then the third time he's shut in the bathroom for 10-15 minutes. (Breaks my heart as the other kitty is on the outside of the door missing him). :cry: Anyway, when I let him out of the bathroom, I have a brand new perfectly behaved kitty.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think they would stop on their own without hurting each...so I don't HAVE to put them behind closed doors. But I think it helps them "cool down".
If you think of cats being like kids, it makes sense that since they are around each other ALL the time, they will get pissy with each other now and then. A little time apart I think may be good for them?
I know when Justin was lost for the night, Stormy was meowing and looking for him and all sad. And when I had Stormy out on the balcony with me and Justin didn't know where she was, he was meowing and looking for her too.
 

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Yup, we've done it. One introduction we had was rough. It wasn't that the fighting was fur-flying and caterwauling style...it was just that one cat was very sensitive and was not interested in playing attack with the new one. So we started just telling the sparked up cat to stop and, if he didn't, non-judgmentally putting him in a closed room for a few minutes. It didn't take long before he learned that it wasn't worth starting this kind of thing up and mellowed out.

We also do time outs with certain cats at the adoption center where I volunteer. I have found that it doesn't always work. Some cats, especially males that have a certain temperament, but also some territorial females, can be calm for 15 minutes in their cage but rile right back up as soon as you let them out with the 'wrong' cat. With these cats there is generally a rule posted that so-and-so isn't allowed to be out at the same time as their attackees and vice versa.

~Heather
 

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I'm so happy to have discovered this thread - I've been dealing with a hyper new kitty who likes to terrorize my older cat.

With the exception of a quick, loud clap or "No!" (which completely freaks out my older cat) I've been using a time out as a last resort when the situation gets too bad, and always if he chases at her when she's in the litterbox (absolutely not okay).

I've always done it very calmly - picking him up and putting him upstairs without saying a word. I'm glad to hear that other people are using this method with success.
 

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I'm wondering if this would work with the cat and dog? At first it was both of them starting the "fights", but now the dog just goes over tail wagging to say hi, and it's the cat who starts hissing and spitting and growling, which, understandably, gets the dog upset. We generally let them try to deal with things themselves unless the dog is acting naughty, but now we're having to tell the cat to calm down. I'm really not sure what to do about it because it's not like I blame the cat for getting upset about a big doggy-nose snuffling in his corner.

And yes, the cat has lots of up-high places the dog can't get to. :) But often the kitty comes down to sit on a desk or windowsill.
 
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