Cat Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone here have any of their kitties on Lactulose long term. Any thing for arthritis in cats?

My 3 year old black kitty, Emma, is a very strange case. I got her from a cat rescue that doesn't handle kittens at 6 weeks of age. She had severe problems going poo and was on cisapride and lactulose for a long time. She also is very strange in that you walks low on her metacarpals (wrists) on her front feet and looks like she has flippers. She also has a stilted gait in her back legs. In all my years of being around cats I have never seen a cat like her yet the four different vets I have brought her to for differing opinions either have no clue why she is the way she is or simply don't seem to care. Because at the vets office she is so scared and never moves, I don't think they are getting the full picture of the way she walks.

After being problem free for a couple of years, she recently had a bit of a problem going poop and we had to do an enema and my boss ( a vet) took x-rays. At three years of age, he already sees a few spots of arthritis in her back.

My main goal is to make this cat comfortable even though I know she may not live a full life like a normal cat. I am debating putting her on a low dose of lactulose as a maintainance so that she never has bowel issues. She also seems to have a low metabolism and puts on weight easily. The cat cosequin comes in a powder or capsule that you have to mix with canned food. Well I would prefer not to offer her more food than necessary to keep her weight down. Oh, I should probably mention that she has had a bladder stone removed already so unfortunately all my kitties are being fed dry C/D cat food. *sigh*

If anyone has any insight or advice, I would LOVE to hear it! Thanks :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,101 Posts
Emma's orthopedic problems are probably congenital. Most kittens like her don't survive so most vets probably haven't seen many like her. I've seen a few. If you had a boatload of money an orthopedic surgeon could probably fuse the wrists and do some other corrective work, but since very few of us have a boatload of money, that's probably not in the cards!

Cosequin is fine, but it is very expensive. You can get plain glucosamine at the health food store. 250 mg per day for an average cat is plenty. MSM is also helpful as an anti-inflammatory and supports collagen formation; 200 mg per day.

Re diet, c/d dry does not work, according to experts; only the canned version does. Feeding c/d to healthy cats is also dangerous, because it can predispose to forming a different type of stone. We once removed *40* bladder stones from a cat who had eaten c/d for ten years because his brother once had an episode of urinary problems. I recommend NO dry food ever for cats with a history of crystals or stones.

Dry food is where all the calories are, and where the weight gain comes from. Cats are the original Atkins dieters. Cats use protein and fat for fuel; carbs just get converted to body fat. Canned food (low carbohydrate) is the best preventive for weight gain.

As a side benefit, canned food helps prevent bladder stones because the high moisture prevents crystal formation.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for your reply Dr. Jean!

Well you certainly have my brain working overtime now LOL I've never heard this about CD dry. All but one of my cats loves canned food. Taking away dry food and feeding them canned food for their individual needs makes a lot more sense! I admit I have always found feeding canned food to my crew daunting. One finishes before the other and trys to steal, more work etc. I think I'm going to give it a try again though.

You're right, no boatload of money here either. Thanks for the tip on glucosomine. I'd rather put a pill down her throat and know that she is getting the full dose than mix it in her food.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top