Cat Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
981 Posts
And it could even be environmental allergy to washing powder...not sure what to change to use for that though.
It can be environmental allergy to many things in the home.
If this were my cat I would remove all chemicals from the house entirely. No hair spray no chemical cleaners at all, nothing with any scent to it, and so on. I would find a place to store the laundry detergent so that there's no chance it will be in the air, and switch to a liquid form that will not put powder into the air. No cleansers at all -- just use white vinegar and water to clean. Cheaper and just as effective for almost everything. Dish soap- make sure it doesn't have any fragrance in it. Same with human soap. Go as simple as possible.

Keep in mind that only feeding chicken or turkey is not a balanced diet (if you mean just the meat, rather than a chicken or turkey based canned food). If you want to do an elimination diet you need to go down to only one, not two at a time.

Keep in mind also that if your cat has kidney issues, feeding a food that is as low as possible in phosphorus is very important. You may have to do some research to find that food, but that is one thing you need to focus on.

It's hard, having allergy issues and other issues at the same time. You may have to sacrifice what is best for one in order to prioritize the other. I suggest you work as closely as possible with a good vet, and I sure do wish you the best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
981 Posts
Did your vet talk about oral corticosteroids or even shots? Maybe they are less invasive vs. Reconcile...
My advice is to stay far away from steroids. They will make the cat feel better short term but they do absolutely nothing to address the problem, only mask the issue by artificially over-stimulating the adrenal glands, which has very bad effects if used for more than a day or two. Definitely not something you want the cat to be on in any on-going manner. I avoid them completely both for myself and for my animals. It is not any solution.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
981 Posts
I read about the side effects after my cat had a shot of long term steroids that got him sick, but I wonder how come vets are so quick in recommending them.
Is there any other solution to stop the itch and overgrooming issue?
Honestly I do not know why vets recommend steroids. My vet does too. She is an old-time and old fashioned vet, and she and I do not agree on everything but she's a super vet and we have a great relationship anyway. I know a lot of modern vets are more likely not to use them and instead recommend more natural approaches.

I think in your place, I would consider going to a naturopathic or even homeopathic vet if there is one in your area. This sounds to me like a systemic problem and treating it symptomatically will not solve it.

Now, I used to be very skeptical about naturopathic vets, and simply thought homeopathy was hogwash. But then my beloved soul-mate cat had a problem that no vet could solve. I took him to a homeopathic vet that someone recommended simply because at that point I would have tried sitting on a flag pole and singing the national anthem for an hour if someone said it might help.

Long story short, the homeopathic remedy worked so well I had almost a new cat within 48 hours and the problem never came back.
Not saying that would happen for you. but it might be worth a try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
981 Posts
I am glad you are seeing a different vet.
Soy protein is no good for a cat. Cats, as your vet should know, (and obviously you know as well) are obligate carnivores, which means they cannot assimilate protein from any source other than meat. I wouldn't ever give my cat soy! You are absolutely correct that you shouldn't give a cat soy.

And treating with steroids in my opinion is a very bad idea. Steroids do not treat anything, all they do is over-stimulate the adrenal gland which makes the person or animal feel a lot better initially but it does nothing for the actual problem and additionally it has terrible long term effects. I think in order to give your cat a little break, it is probably OK, but shouldn't go on for more than a week, because steroids are so bad.

No doubt you and your cat are both desperate for a solution. I know I would be. And if the prednisone gives a little break and that helps, then so be it.
I am wondering, though, if it could possible be psychological? This is only a guess on my part. But is there a chance your cat could be stressed out or nervous? And he has just, as a result, gotten into this habit? I think that if nothing physical could be found, and no allergy test turned up the culprit, I might consider a more calming sort of approach, starting out with natural remedies that might work on the cat's mind. Just brainstorming here.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top