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We can develop allergies to everyday products at any time, even things we've used for years. Some other environmental things you could try is changing to a different brand of unscented litter in an uncovered litterbox, vacuuming those hard to reach places under and behind the furniture and any cat beds and trees to remove dust mites, and using unscented laundry detergent with no dryer-sheets. You could note if there's a specific place your cats over-groom, and if so, either remove what they're laying on or cover it with something else. And if you see your cat over-grooming, you could try to distract them with a grooming brush or petting, and give them praise when they're not.
Thanks for the message, I think it is a good approach and we are already using a natural, unscented litter and trying to vacuum more than usual.

Strange thing is that when I took him to the cat sitter for 10 days when we were out for holidays, he didn't scratch. He started doing so like 1 week after coming from back her place. We ruled out fleas as he was protected when he first went in there.
But it leads me to think it might be something in the atmosphere...like plants. We have many of them but no idea if they can trigger allergic reactions :unsure:. Especially that he never eats them and they are not plants that make flowers in order to have pollen
 

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Back with updates on my boy, we took him to our vet that once again said to start him on Prednisolone, one pill per day for 7 days then gradually reduce the dose. He also said that we should give him another type of pill that will kind of sedate him to stop the scratching. Then talking about food again the recommendation of hypoallergenic food, this time I think Royal Canin kibbles that have no meat in them, only soya protein.
I was all in all disappointed with this approach that seemed very harsh, why drug so much a cat that indeed scratches herself but is still in good shape. As for the food, with my little knowledge I am really against feeding a carnivore dry soya...what is wrong with doctors recommending this.

I negotiated with the doctor that seemed to be a bit upset by the fact that I question his treatment and decided to start him on Prednisolone to see if his symptoms calm down, have to say that I wanted to give him and us a break from the scratching and licking, as he is been doing it for 1month 1/2.

The scratching stopped and next week we have an appointment with a phyto veterinarian to try and see if we can switch to a less aggressive approach. I just want a vet that listens and doesn't immediately jumps to the pill cupboard....:rolleyes:
 

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I am glad you are seeing a different vet.
Soy protein is no good for a cat. Cats, as your vet should know, (and obviously you know as well) are obligate carnivores, which means they cannot assimilate protein from any source other than meat. I wouldn't ever give my cat soy! You are absolutely correct that you shouldn't give a cat soy.

And treating with steroids in my opinion is a very bad idea. Steroids do not treat anything, all they do is over-stimulate the adrenal gland which makes the person or animal feel a lot better initially but it does nothing for the actual problem and additionally it has terrible long term effects. I think in order to give your cat a little break, it is probably OK, but shouldn't go on for more than a week, because steroids are so bad.

No doubt you and your cat are both desperate for a solution. I know I would be. And if the prednisone gives a little break and that helps, then so be it.
I am wondering, though, if it could possible be psychological? This is only a guess on my part. But is there a chance your cat could be stressed out or nervous? And he has just, as a result, gotten into this habit? I think that if nothing physical could be found, and no allergy test turned up the culprit, I might consider a more calming sort of approach, starting out with natural remedies that might work on the cat's mind. Just brainstorming here.
 

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Hello! A quick update following the phyto / naturist veterinarian that came to our house to see my boy. She said to continue decreasing the steroids slowly slowly and start with additional treatments on top:
1) Redonyl Ultra for cats >> it's an Omega 3 and 6 supplements that I put in his food once per day
2) Allerderm Spot on >> a spot on solution that I put on his skin once per week that contains cholesterol and omegas to help treat the itch
3) Probiotics for his tummy >> apparently is a good basis to make sure he has a good vitamin and minerals intake
4) Plant concentrated drops (cassis +2 other plants) >> one of them is to detoxify his liver and the cassis acts as a natural steroid; all this morning and evening in his food
5) Homeopatic >> didn't yet start this as to let his body adjust to all the other treatments
6) Diet >> eliminating the Hill's Z/D and my suspicion being chicken, I passed him on wet food consisting only on mackerel and dry food again only fish cod

Currently he is taking 2.5 g Prednisolone every other day + tummy protectors (she said that they are absolutely necessary with cortisone) and we will reduce the dose to 1/4 every other day on Friday in the hope that his symptoms will not come back. He had some small moments of rolling skin and scratching but nothing compared to before. I know that he is still under cortisone but I do hope that when we will reduce the dose even more he will not relapse.

The approach that the new vet had, was much more human and interested in understanding what happened to him without stuffing him with unnecessary pills. Will keep you posted and fingers crossed that we can take him out of cortisone.

Hope this might help some other persons that are dealing with the same issues :)
 
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