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My boyfriend and I are looking to get a second cat at some point. I have a seasonal job, so I'm off from October to April. I did a lot of reading about this, and we think this is a good time so start looking since I'm home all day and can work with the cats. When I go back to work, I work some crazy hours (a lot of 16 hour day), and I am still taking online classes for school. My boyfriend also works some long shifts, and we thought getting a friend for our cat would be a good option. I spend as much time as possible with him, but I felt so bad leaving him home alone so much in the summer.

Skids is two, and has had only one experience with another cat, and it didn't go well (but we were not prepared for that either). I did tons of research on introducing the two, so I'm confident it would go better this time, but I'm more concerned with what kinda cat to look for. Skids is really big and full of energy. Plus he's used to getting all the attention. I know cats are all different, so what works for one might not work the another, but any suggestions? Should I keep my eye out for a girl or a boy? What age? One that's just a playful or more laid back? I talked to people at the humane society, and got a lot of opinions. I'm just looking for any info I can get to make this go as smoothly as possible. Most of the people I talked to recommended a boy within six months of Skids' age.
 

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My cats are also two years old and they are accepting the new kittens very nicely. There has been very little hissing, no fighting and they have all begun to play together.

Try to adopt your new kitten at no younger than 12 weeks, though. Kittens get their feline socialization/manners schooling in that time-frame between 8 and 12 weeks. They're not destined for mental problems without it, but it's definitely better for them to have it.

Good luck! Sounds like getting a buddy for your little friend will be a good thing for him!
 

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I've seen so many easy introductions of a kitten to an adult cat here. My opinion is that you're almost certain of a smooth, easy intro with a kitten, but it's kinda iffy with an adult kitty.
 

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I recently introduced my cat to a baby Persian and they did great together. The Persian is very laid back and easy going. He is not aggressive at all is very submissive. Like others have said, most kittens will probably get along well. Just keep in mind the pecking order. What ever you decide your cat will establish dominance over the new intruder. :)

Though Persians are great, they are extremely high maintenance, so it may not be the best choice for you if you are gone a lot 6 months out of the year. ??

Good luck - I hope it goes well for you.
 

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I was perfectly happy with having an only child. When we talked about having a second child so the first wouldn't be lonely, my husband reminded me about how we adopted Bunny (kitten) so Cleo (about 3 at the time) wouldn't be lonely while we worked.

We decided not to have the second child.
:lol:

I do agree with the others though. While Cleo wasn't happy about Bunny's arrival, I think it would have been even more difficult with an adult cat.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the input. We'll be visiting the humane society this weekend to check things out! *fingers crossed*
 

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I have to agree that introducing kittens is often much easier than adults, but then we just had a very different experience with our new 6 month old kitten. His was a much more difficult intro than any I've experienced with my cats and other adult cats.
I don't think you should rule out an adult cat just because it might mean a more difficult introduction. Sadie was an adult when she was introduced to the household (3 other adult cats at that time) and they were all friends and getting along within a week. It was the same way when I moved in with a roommate and his adult cat. The transition was a very easy one and they were getting along in no time. I think it really just depends on the cats involved.

Something to consider is that a young kitten has not yet fully developed it's personality. Getting a young kitten means you're taking more of a chance on getting a cat with a personality that may not be as compatible with you or your other cat, where as if you adopt an adult, you typically have a better idea of what you're getting. You could choose one that has a similar activity level and a temperament that you think would work well with your other cat.

Another thing to remember is that kittens are very high maintenance. They have a lot of energy (which if your cat is very active, he may not mind, but other cats might not take so kindly to the constant harassment from a playful kitten), and they need a lot of attention from you. If, come April you and your boyfriend will both be working long shifts and taking classes, are you going to have the time and attention to devote to a kitten at that time? I'm not saying that you won't, because only you can really decide that, but its something to seriously consider when you're trying to find the right cat.
 

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Nell said:
I have to agree that introducing kittens is often much easier than adults, but then we just had a very different experience with our new 6 month old kitten. His was a much more difficult intro than any I've experienced with my cats and other adult cats.
I don't think you should rule out an adult cat just because it might mean a more difficult introduction. Sadie was an adult when she was introduced to the household (3 other adult cats at that time) and they were all friends and getting along within a week. It was the same way when I moved in with a roommate and his adult cat. The transition was a very easy one and they were getting along in no time. I think it really just depends on the cats involved.

Something to consider is that a young kitten has not yet fully developed it's personality. Getting a young kitten means you're taking more of a chance on getting a cat with a personality that may not be as compatible with you or your other cat, where as if you adopt an adult, you typically have a better idea of what you're getting. You could choose one that has a similar activity level and a temperament that you think would work well with your other cat.

Another thing to remember is that kittens are very high maintenance. They have a lot of energy (which if your cat is very active, he may not mind, but other cats might not take so kindly to the constant harassment from a playful kitten), and they need a lot of attention from you. If, come April you and your boyfriend will both be working long shifts and taking classes, are you going to have the time and attention to devote to a kitten at that time? I'm not saying that you won't, because only you can really decide that, but its something to seriously consider when you're trying to find the right cat.

Thanks! That was really helpful!
 
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