Cat Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For those who feed their raw ground up, what sort of meat/bone grinder do you use? I was thinking of getting one from cabelas, one with a hand crank (cheaper, and only I burn out, not a motor). I would love to get Darius on an all raw diet, since he has shown he likes the taste of raw. It'd be easy to weigh out bones, meat, and organs to the correct percentages, and toss it all in a grinder and freeze portions for future feedings. He wasn't so keen on meaty bones yet (tried him with turkey necks a few different times and a few rabbit legs), but hopefully he'll eventually take to them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
When we were considering a ground diet for transition we were going to be Cabela's. They are magnificent grinders!

Luckily for us, we found a lady who grinds and sells for fairly cheap near us so we didn't have to go that route, but I would say those products would be a good investment.

And once he's one whole pieces of stuff you can always use it to make hamburger/sausage/etc! YAY!

*Edit: If he is eating just the ground stuff without mixing it with canned, make sure you suppliment w/taurine until he's eating whole chunks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
A few days a week I am giving him a bravo balance chicken formula raw meat patty (4oz) for dinner instead of his normal canned California Natural. He licks the plate clean.

How does grinding affect the taurine levels, anyway? I wouldn't expect the mechanical action of the grinder to denature it since it isn't heating the meat, just shearing it into smaller pieces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
No idea how it does it (my brain does not work that way LOL) but there was a study done with cats being fed rabbits.. whole rabbits, actually. The cats who were getting them ground (organs/fur/bone/meat) eventually all had taurine deficiencies and had to be given taurine supps to get their hearts back in good order. Then they were fine. *shrugs* I took this as a pretty good sign that grinding does get rid of substantial amounts of taurine. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,059 Posts
the only difference between a whole rabbit and ground rabbit is.. well.. the grinding!
That isn't necessarily true. According to the link you provided, there are a number of variables that can affect taurine availability in meat:

"the amount of Taurine available to the cat in a diet depends on a number of factors, such as the amount of protein, the quality of the protein, whether the diet is cooked or raw, and what other ingredients are present in the diet that might increase the amount of Taurine needed (Backus et al., 1998) (Park et al, 1999). It is also possible that bacteria in the carcass of the ground rabbits or in the intestine of the cats broke down some of the Taurine. ... Vitamin E levels in our raw rabbit diet were low and this can cause the meat to lose Taurine as it is processed and ground (Lambert et al., 2001)."

I suspect that freezing would also affect taurine content of meat, and the ground rabbit referenced in that article was frozen and thawed.

Laurie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
A lot of people probably feed frozen thawed meat, unless people buy what they need every few days. I'll probably be feeding batches that are frozen and thawed out.

That article was definitely an interesting read. I wonder if it was indeed being ground that contributed to the deficiency, or the other factors Laurie quoted from the article. It would have been great if there had been a group being fed ground whole rabbit, and another group being fed frankenprey, which would clear up whether ground meat does affect taurine levels or not.

From what I learned in biochemistry in college, proteins are denatured when they are exposed to heat, chemicals (strong acid or base, for example), inorganic salts, and some solvents. Heat obviously destroys taurine levels in meat, as cooked meat has much less of it then raw. I did just pull up an article that seems to suggest that when meat is ground, more of the surface area of the meat is exposed to bacteria, which breaks down the taurine. So it isn't the mechanical action of grinding that is the problem. I would think that fresh ground meat, which hasn't had a chance to be exposed to much bacterial action, wouldn't be deficient in taurine. But alas, I am no scientist and can't do a controlled study! I do hope to only start out ground and get Darius more comfortable with frankenprey anyway.

http://rawdiettruth.blogspot.com/2009/0 ... diets.html

Definitely a fascinating subject to me!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top