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Hi there, I've had my cat on raw for a couple of weeks now and I thought I'd put up what he's getting, to see if anyone has any suggestions! This forum is so good for knowledge, I've been reading it all through :)

Bone - he gets either half a chicken wing or a chicken neck, every other day. Such a shame cats only want 10% bone as he LOVES bone, he'd eat it every meal if he could!

Liver - one lamb's liver a week
Organs - one lamb's kidney a week

Muscle - a mix of chicken (his favourite), pork offcuts, diced beef, and lamb's heart (which he isn't keen on but he'll eat if he's really hungry and it's chopped up for him!)

I feed him 3 times a day, a fairly big meal in the morning and a small one when I get back from work, and a smaller one still at bedtime. He's 10 months old and still growing (looks like he's going to be a big cat), but he might be getting a little bit pudgy, not sure. He is ALWAYS ready to eat now he's on raw so I have to watch him, I don't think he'd self regulate!

If anyone has any comments on his food I'd be all ears, always looking to improve things for him :) Oh and I'm not using a taurine supplement, hope that's ok with what I'm feeding him?

Thanks!
 

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Well if he likes bones that much...I feed mine bone every day. But the bone is a smaller portion. I don't believe in measuring out things to death. My cats are 7lbs and 11lbs. I feed a quail wing or two quail drumsticks a day.
 

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I am curious how you find lamb liver and lamb heart. My cats like lamb meat but cannot find such things not ground.
One of my cats used to eat a lot (twice of adult cat) until he was one year old. As he passes one year old mark, he started eating less. Now he is in perfect shape.
With the proper diet, he seems to understand when he is full and when to stop - in a way... I mean. He still loves food and sometimes eats too much, too quick and throws up right after.
 

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How many ounces of liver are you feeding? And kidney? I wonder if maybe you aren't feeding just a bit more of each of these than is recommended? Unless the cat weighs over 12 pounds, two ounces a week should be plenty.

Only two or three of my cats would self-regulate (Rachel and Heather, and maybe Allen). Spencer and Ralph, however, wouldn't stop eating until they were sick. Spencer's an ex-feral, though, so he's been hungry before, and Ralph was abandoned in an empty apartment to starve to death - and nearly succeeded - so I definitely understand why he has no "off" switch. Meghan might regulate herself, but all she has to do is look at food to gain weight, so she'd be a fat cat in no time if I didn't feed measured amounts. ;)

AC
 

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What is the reasoning behind limiting liver to <10%? Kidney as well... Both of these organs are loaded with nutrients; I am wondering what is the reason the consensus feels they need to be moderated...:?::?::catmilk
 

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My understanding is you limit organs like kidney and liver to <10% because they are both high in Vitamins A and D. These vitamins are fat soluble. Unlike taurine, which is water soluble so any excess is just excreted in the urine, vitamin A and D are stored in the body. So it's possible for these vitamins to build up to dangerous levels and cause vitamin A toxicity.

I think vitamin A toxicity leads to painful, excessive bone growth along the spine? I'm about to head to bed, but if that's wrong I'm sure someone will correct me. So yeah, even though organs are full of wonderful vitamins and nutrients it can turn out to be too much of a good thing.
 

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As Catinthemirror posted, too much liver can/will lead to vitamin A toxicity. I've never heard mention of any particular nutrient overdose related to kidney and other secreting organs, however, more than the recommended amounts of organs can lead to nausea and diarrhea and will, by default, mean either the meat or the bone-in meals are being fed at lower than the recommended percentages.

Too little meat and the cat can become malnourished. Too little bone and you start messing with a cat's growth (not to mention his digestive system; too much bone and the cat becomes constipated, too little and he gets diarrhea).

When "home" feeding a raw diet, you want to stay in the same range of body parts as a cat would naturally feed upon in the wild. That's 80%-87% meat, fat, skin, sinew, connective tissue and heart, 5%-10% edible bone, 3%-5% liver, and 5% other secreting organ, usually called the 80/10/5/5 rule. (Rodents are roughly 5% bone and 4% liver, rabbits are slightly less than 10% bone and less than 4% liver, and birds have an even lower bone and organ content.)

These are guidelines, not hard and fast rules that insist you weigh every single bite the cat eats - in fact, most raw feeders balance the percentages out over a week's time (not by the meal or even by the day) but you really don't want to stray too far from a cat's normal, natural diet. Unbalance nutrition just messes everything up. :?

AC
 
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