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Well, I found him outside.
To this day, (he was born June 3rd I believe) he weighs 7 1/2 pounds and he still has these tiny, stubby legs. They're not like a munchkin, but they're pretty short.
Not only that, he has a small nose, I think he has nasal problems too, because he's always snoring, and he gets black mucus in his nose sometimes too.
Is he some sort of mixed Persian, munchkin breed, that is watered down with some alley cats?
Most I know is that his mother was a swirled tabby.
No idea what his father looks like.
Not to mention, he is unbelievabley affectionate and tolerant, and LOVES to meet new people, and only takes a few days to adjust to new cats.

So, what do you guys think?
I should also mention that most of the outdoor cats I feed have short legs too.
He's not from their litter though, I found him somewhere else.
 

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I have to agree; I think your kitty looks pretty normal in terms of his leg length and nose size--it is possible that he's cuter than average though. ;)

Cats come in all shapes and sizes, the extremes of which do tend to be associated with pedigree cats of various breeds; but that's not to say that a moggie can't share physical traits common to purebred cats. Genetic mutation, which is the basis of any new breed, can occur in any cat. Purebred cats look the way they do because either nature or human breeders have selected for the particular genetic mutations that exemplify a breed, either because they are biologically advantageous adaptations, in the case of nature, or because they result in an aesthetic or temperament that is desirable in some way, in the case of selective breeding by humans.

It's entirely possible that your cat does, somewhere in his genetic past, have a purebred ancestor, but there's no way to determine if that's the case. Many of the genetic mutations that have resulted in distinct cat breeds are recessive, and do occur now and again in the general cat population, but it's very rarely possible to trace those traits back to any particular breed of cat.
 

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He's cute. My Missy has teeny legs and she's knock-kneed in the back! We adopted her as a senior with a mostly unknown 1st 6 years or so, so she could have had a hip injury once upon a time. I like little short legs - Munchkins have those, too.
 
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