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Ok ...

My cat is pregnant. She is at about 7 weeks. I live in a bachlor apartment with a semi second floor. However, the entire place is like one big room. I have two cats. The mother and the father. The father is getting fixed next week.

Anyway, please may I have some adivce on how to help her out. I don't have a seperate room other than the bathroom. So, I really don't know where to put her. I already prepared a box with blankets in it near the food and water and litter box. But, I started reading through here and noticed people saying they should have their own room.

Also, what do I do if she has the kittens somewhere not safe like the bathroom floor and not the box. Can I, should I, move them to the box I made up for her?

The worst part is that my apartment is determined by my employer, and he said I may have to move soon. The problem is he hasn't got an exact date. I will then be in a full apartment, but with the way things work in Korea I will never know the date until the last minute. Once I know, I will likely only be able to delay for a few days. Some advice on what to do here would be great because I may have to move (or may not).

And if I stay what can I do?

Thanks in advance, I really need some help ... .

m ...
 

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First of all, I have heard VERY GOOD things about Korean cat food. So if you could post the ingredient list and nutritional analysis of Korean cat foods, we can help you pick out a food, so you don't have to spend $$$ on American cat foods. I know a lot of members would recommend Innova and Wellness, but there is a good chance it would be unaffordable in Korea (I am from Taiwan, and American cat foods cost $$$ in there).
 

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no offense shengmai but I don't think brands of cat food are on his mind right now. Unfortunately I have not dealt with a pregnant cat before so I cannnot offer much help but I am sure someone can and will. Good luck.
 

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MMM... I have birthed many many dogs before but never cats. In my experience, when someone cuts unwashed old clothes into little rags (so it still has the owner's scient on them) and put them in a big cardboard box the rags greatly calm the pregnant dog.

I don't know if it works for cats, though.
 

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You may not know what to do, but I'd say she probably does. Just try to provide a safe, clean environment -- nature will hopefully provide the rest.

These articles may be of help to you --
http://cats.about.com/od/reproduction/


CatDad


Don't forget to have them fixed along with mom & dad at the appropriate time ... good luck.
 

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My cat gave birth to kittens over a year ago.

We set up a cozy bed for her in the bedroom closet. Of course, she didn't have her kittens where we wanted her to, she chose her own spot!

She had her kittens under the bed where she likes to sleep/hide.

My advice is: make her cozy bed or shelter in a place where she likes to hang out. She won't have kittens where you want her to have them, she'll have them where she feels comfortable.

Make sure she's eating well. There are posts up on this forum about feeding kitten food for extra nutrition for the expecting mommy.

You'll probably have to keep the daddy cat separated from the mommy cat when the time is near, and then keep daddy cat away for a while, until it's safe to do proper introductions to the new kittens. I'm not so sure on a timetable for when the introductions should take place ... we did it slowly, weeks after the kittens were born. Of course, we were able to keep the mom/kittens in the bedroom (we let the mom cat out frequently to do her business) and keep the dad away.

If you do a search, you'll find lots of helpful topics of cats and pregnancies.

Wish you the best!

I know cats aren't that loved in Korea (I'm Korean), so good luck finding good homes for them, too, if you're not keeping them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was hoping for more advice than this. I thought some people here would be little more forthcoming with their experiences or thoughts.

Anyway, does anyone think it would be better for me to have the father moved to a friend's place until after the kittens are born and old enough? Or should I leave him here with her? I worry that in that case reintroduction will be difficult.

As for the potential of moving I will deal with that later if, or when, it comes.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
oh yea, thanks catdad for the links ... I already read a lot of those.


And one more question:

If Misha has her kittens somewhere I think is inappropriate, can I move them to the nest I made for her?

thanks in advance .. .
 

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Hi,
It's been years and years since I've had a cat with kittens. They tell you not to touch the new kittens but we always did and never had any issues. My advice is get her settled in the box now. Watch for where she's sleeping and hanging out. Use old clothes, baby pads or baby blankets, make sure she can easily get in and out and can see out. It would probably be better to have the opening on the side, not the top. Once you've done that, if she has her kittens somewhere else - like under the bathroom sink you will have move them. Go in while she's there. Pet her, pet the kittens. Pick each one up then hold it up to her to lick and then put them back down. Go get your kitten box and bring it to where she had them. Put her and 1 kitten in the box then add the others. Make sure she's calm and likes the box. Using the baby blankets let us change and wash them when they get too soiled (especailly after deliver). If she doesn't like what you've done she will move them. As long as the kittens are warm and safe you may have to let her decide where they're going to nest. The biggest trick is to not stress her out. Also, you need to see how your other cat reacts to the kittens. Other cats and dogs have been known to kill kittens. He may need to be kept separate from the mama and kittens. If you have no other room, use the bathroom or a large closet. She will need space to get up and rest away from the kittens and you can let her out when you're home but until you're comfortable that the male cat won't harm them, you're better off keeping them separate.
 

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I think you've done just about everything you can do. It's OK to have he other cats around her when she gives birth and afterwards as long as they all get along.

If she gives birth somewhere else than in the box, take the kittens and her to the box. Often that all it takes for mother cat to understand that the box is the babies "home".

Start watching her carefully when she's about 8½ week pregnant. The first contractions can last for a few hours and aren't very strong, but when the contractions do get strong and powerful (you'll notcie that) the first baby should come within an hour, if not you should call a vet. It's important that you have a telephone number to a vet available if something should go wrong (most of the time cats do very well on their own).

Buy some kitten formula if you have to hand feed (not usual, but sometimes it's needed). Weigh the kittens every day, I prefer weighing them twice a day, so you can see if the gain weight.

Good luck! :D

And do ask more specific questions if you wonder about some particular detail.
 

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Even though she had a nice next box all set up and waiting for her kittens for weeks, Squirrel woke me up at 3am one morning when her waterbroke on my bed. Just a wet spot but I knew what would happen next.

I took her to her box. I thyink she got scared when the first one started crowning so she jumped out of the box and ran to near the litter box on the opther side of the room. She has kitten number one just outside the litterbox. Then her protective instincts took over, she picked up the baby and headed for the nearest "cave" -- The covered litterbox and dropped him inside.

I quickly and gently picked up the slimy, breaded in litter kitten and carefully bathed him under the faucet to get the litter off him. I figured a quick warm shower that lasted 30 seconds was less stressful than trying to clean him with a towel for 5 minutes.

I wrapped him in a warm towel and placed him and mom cat in the nest box. She had the next 3 kittens in the box without incident and was happy to keep them in that same box until they climbed on their own 4 weeks later.

The point of this story is that cats and kittens can be very resilient. Now that I have been through it, I can say I worried too much before hand.

That first kitten is named Schnitzel - a german breaded meat dish - because of his experience.

:D

P.S Be careful about leaving drawers open now. A friend left her sock drawer open and went to work and she came home to find her cat had chosen the drawer to give birth in. Mom and 5 kittens took over the drawer for the next few weeks.
 

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I've had 2 experiences with cats giving birth (2 seperate cats, by the way).

Each time I provided each cat with a cardboard box, approx. 12" depth, and lined it with towels. I put the boxes in a little used closet (for privacy) and left the door open about 12". I did this a couple of weeks before the births so the mommas had time to "discover" this safe, dark place to have her kits. Other than that, I did nothing else in particular. Each momma found the box and proceded to give birth to her kits. She nursed & groomed them and came out of the box to feed & drink at her leisure.

Nothing to it! Good luck & enjoy the experience. :D

P.S. As far as the daddy is concerned.............my experience was that the momma cats are EXTREMELY protective of her kits and will NOT allow any other cat to come near them. If anything, I would be concerned about the safety of the daddy, as she will probably beat the crap out of anyone who she even thinks may harm her kits.
 

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It would be best, in my experience, to keep the Tom away from the mother cat, especially when she is ready to deliver. I found that the bloody mucous discharge ,which indicates that birth is imminent, seems to attract the male. It's best to have a quiet, private, dimly lighted area for a box. Mother cat often moves the kittens if the area you've chosen is not suitable. Even though the kittens will be born with their eyes shut, mother cat always seeks out a spot--like a closet--which is private and relatively dark.

Mother cat will want a great deal of affection when she is ready to give birth. My Precious wanted me with her at all times. Other queens will prefer privacy.

I suggest that you read the links given, in case you have to assist in the births. Of course, you should have the vet's number, alcohol (to sterilize scissors), and lots of clean towels handy. I use sterile (unopened newspaper) in the box, with a clean bath towel on top. Hand towels are very handy for rubbing up the kittens- to dry them, keep them warm, and "get them going." A special heating pad for baby animals is very nice to have. Sometimes even the lowest setting on our own heating pads is too warm. Mother cat will probably take care of everything, but you'll be prepared if the kittens come along too quickly, or if mother doesn't remove them from the sack quickly. I clean the bed as needed, and replace the towels with clean ones. During labor and after the birthing, offer mother cat water and soupy food. She will probably spend most of her time with the kittens, so keep a litter box in the room also. There is much more you will want to know, but this and the links here should give you considerable help. This link should be of help also:

http://www.talktothevet.com/ARTICLES/CATS/catbirth.HTM

I didn't handle the kittens a lot the first couple of days, but they do need to get used to your touch and voice the first week. They are a great joy, of course, but as I'm sure other members have advised, it is best to have both cats neutered, unless they are exceptional examples of their breed. I'm sure you know about the overabundance of cats and kittens in the shelters. :( I wish you the best with the birth and finding good homes for the kittens. Please keep us informed! :)
 
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