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For the last 3 weeks, my cat has refused to eat his wet food, but he will nibble on his dry throught the day.. And i can tell just from petting him that hes lost some weight.. Is it because im not letting him outside? Or like is it some behavior/instinct problem.. I pay good money for his food and im getting tired of throwing away almost 50 cents a can..

Any Ideas?
 

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Yes--take him to the vet. It sounds like there is something physically wrong with him. If he's eating poorly and losing weight, he needs medical attention. Please get him seen as soon as possible!

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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Actually, dry food is 10 times richer than wet food. So if your cat only wants dry that is a good thing. So don't spend any more money on wet.
However, if your cat is not eating enought dry to stay healthy then he should be seen by a Vet. But if he is in good health and has no other problems the dry food is perfect.
 

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Many studies have now shown how many serious problems dry food causes for cats. The low moisture and high carbohydrates contribute to obesity, urinary tract disease, and diabetes. It, however, cheap and convenient --good for you, but there is truly no feature of dry food that is *good* for cats.

I believe that the vast majority of folks on this list are here because they are more interested in doing well by their cats than the average person. Many of you are seeking the best ways of taking care of your cats. To you, our website www.littlebigcat.com is humbly dedicated as a resource.

So before you pass judgment one way or another on the food issue, please do a little more reading and educate yourself so you can make a good decision based on your cat's health, not your wallet. See http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?a ... cannedfood and the other articles on health and nutrition in our free article library!

BTW, just so we're clear, I don't have any ties to any pet food company (in fact, most of them don't like me much, and more than one considers me a royal pain in the @#&!), and I don't make any money putting these free articles online, which take a lot of time and effort to produce. I've spent 10 years researching pet food and feline nutrition. I do it because I love cats and I want to help as many of them as I can. It hurts me when I see cats with diseases caused and perpetuated by bad food (which, honestly, is most of them!). If I'm biased, I'm only biased in favor of the best thing for the cats. So, take my advice or leave it, but do it from a firm base of knowledge. That's all I ask! :)

I also stand by my advice to have a cat who's *noticeably* losing weight to be seen by a vet.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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Read the article. IMHO a dry diet is the root of a host of problems, but some cats go their whole lives on it and are seemingly fine. But if you really want to take their health to a new level, the diet has to change.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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JungleKitty: Not necissarily, while Dr. Jean does speak the truth about findings on dry food health related problems, it's not garunteed every cat will have the same issues, or any ill effects at all.

Do the best on your part, feed a high grade dry food, providing fresh water 24/7, keep offering them foods high in moisture, such as various brands of canned food, see if they finally find one they like, feed other foods with moisture such as chicken or lamb. I know some people like to knock the raw/barf style diets, but for those whom fully understand it and know how to feed it appropriately can be helpfull for some pet owners and their cats. There are recipies you can make for your kitties with good nutrient content, but don't just feed the first one you find off the internet, they are not all complete meals. I'm not sure if Dr. Jean has any such things on her website. Even as suppliments to feed a home made diet in addition to the dry food is good for your cat as well.

Bltsob: Please take your kitty to the doctor. A large change in appiteite can mean many things, specially with him loosing weight makes it a larger concern. Give your cat time, he will adjust to living indoors.
 

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I'm gonna talk about Sweden again :wink: I don't know one Swedish vet that "promotes" wet food except when it comes to cats that doesn't drink enough water. And believe me when I say that few Swedsih vets let pet food companies control them.

European reports shows that high quality dry food is good for your cat. I'm sorry that I don't have any links to any webpages but even if I did I doubt you would understand Swedish, German, Norweigan and other European languages.

The vast majority of the Swedish cats eat only dry food and they are healthy. We probablt have some brands of food that you don't have in the US but we have Royal Canin, IAMS, Eukanuba and some other brands that you have in the US.

The most important thing when feeding dry food is to make sure that the cat drinks water, that the Ph-level in the food is correct and that the level of Magnesium isn't to high. If it is a well balanced formula your cat probably won't get sick.

I on the other hand do not want to contribute to any kind of comercial pet food so I make my own.

I just want to say that there are always different point of views and I wouldn't say it's a disaster that your cat doesn't eat wet food. If your cat doesn't eat anything at all you have a problem.
 

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Sol: Perhaps that is true, I have seen it mentioned in some past studies that high grade dry diets lower the risk of any health problems in the future, in comparison to grocery store type brands and the like. :)

A lot of these studies which you read, do not include foods like Solid Gold, Felidae, or Chicken Soup, they are stacked up against foods like Science Diet, Meow Mix, Iams, etc... you get the idea. So even if you get a list of foods more highly recommened after testing results, these tests completely excluded some of the good foods I just listed. So we don't always know how they would stack up against foods like Iams in regaurds to diabetes.

When people don't see solid gold, or feliae etc presented on a certain list of good foods proven in various test on different objectives, they think that's because those foods were not sufficiant enough to pass the test. Which is not true, they were simply never tested in that case by that one research lab for comparison.
I wish more studies would be done with the so called "natural/holistic foods" (I prefer just to title them HEALTHIER foods).
 

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I moved this thread to Health and Nutrition. I'm curious to know if some of our members think Dr. Jean is an online nickname. Dr. Jean, would you mind telling us what it takes to become a vet? It's not that I think we have to agree with every vet, but I do think we should be grateful to have the opportunity to question one without having to pay a fortune in veterinary costs.

Before I went back to college to get my degree, I had spent years studying piano and voice, and I had been a professional singer in a well respected opera company for many years. I also taught piano and voice and prepared my students very well. I was considered an expert in my field. What a surprise to go to college for five years and discover how little I actually knew! I so appreciate Dr. Jean's presence here for that very reason. We might know a bit more than the average pet owner, but we are not vets. Just my opinion....
 

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:lol: Well after reading some of this evening's posts, I'm not sure being a vet is so terrific!

But, to answer your question. For most vet schools you have to have an initial four-year (bachelors) degree in some biology or science field. Getting into vet school is quite an ordeal. The application was longer than anything I've ever seen! It included an essay where you had to explain your motives and convince them that you could stay the distance. Then there's usually an interview. Vet school is hard to get into. There were 700+ applicants for the 100 spots in my class.

I can only go by my experiences, so here goes. Remember I came in as an older student so my experiences are colored from that viewpoint.

The first year is memorization. Anatomy, anatomy, anatomy! For tests, you'd have to examine dissected, old, decaying, smelly limbs (that we'd been working on for a month) to identify nerves, muscles, bones and blood vessels. Or walk up to a live horse and point out whatever structure was called out to you. (At the end of the first year I won a scholarship to study at Woods Hole Massachusetts, but could not go because I developed pneumonia and pleurisy, from the incredible stress of the semester, and was flat on my back all summer. Star Trek reruns, that's how I survived!)

The second year, we learned what went wrong with the body and how the body responded. In a word, Pathology. Lots of microscope work! Lots of schmoo!

In Junior and Senior years we moved to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Boy, were we hot stuff, or what! Welcome to the world of 36-hour days! Labs, real patients, real surgeries, really having to walk dogs who just had a total hip replacement in the middle of the night because there's no one else to do it, and by the way you have to take all the emergencies coming in, including the sheltie whose owner wrapped a rubber band around his nose to shut him up, and now the rubber band is embedded in his necrotic muzzle, the scars of which he will bear for life. Or the cat having a hard time breathing because her years-old diaphragmatic hernia allowed her gassy bowel to migrate up into her chest on a Friday night, but they don't bother to operate until Monday, at which point they find squamous cell carcinoma under her tonge and this sweetest orange cat suddenly has a death sentence. Or Sampson the Great Pyrenees with osteosarcoma in three legs. They amputate one leg, only to find that the radiation has completely rotted away the other two, he has no chance, and no one is willing to confront the owners and tell them this dog needs to be euthanized. Days of pain and finally we are allowed to take Sampson out on the grass, and love him and hug him and say goodbye.

I was an older student, 36 when I started. So my perspective is somewhat jaundiced. Personally, I hated vet school, but my best friend found it the most wonderful and fulfilling service she could conceive of. I think she's just a better person than me! :oops:

It was not an easy road, but getting that dang diploma was one of the finest moments of my life, because I knew every drop of blood, sweat and tear that went into it!

No wusses go to vet school. You have to want it. You have to want it BAD. It's like wanting to play quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers. Do you have what it takes? Then prove it!

So, I feel I earned this darn DVM and if I have to throw it around a little, well that's just okay! :lol:

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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I don't think I've ever mentioned how much I appreciate Dr. Jean's postings and the time she gives. I do appreciate it. No doubt everyone has noticed that for other than emergencies, vet appointments are generally several days in advance. That indicates to me that they are very busy people. We're very fortunate to have someone like Dr. Jean that shares our interest and enjoys giving of her time to our cats and questions.

I've a feeling that I'm not alone in this appreciation. We just sometimes don't mention it. I guess we assume she already knows it. A bad thing, assuming is. We should more freely express our appreciation.
 

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do you feed your cat the patee mushy stuff or do you get him the chunks kind?

if you feed him patee mushy stuff... try going to chunks. thats my 2 pennies!
 

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empath- hit the nail on the head there, buddy. :)

all together now- "thank you and we love you dr jean!"
 

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It was a rougher road than I thought it would be, and I knew it was very difficult. You're a brilliant woman. Thank you and God bless, DOCTOR Jean. You have my deepest respect.
 

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:oops: Awww, shucks! Thanks to all!

I'm happy to have found a group that's willing to ask questions and listen to all sides. You're even patient when I get on my "high horse"! :wink: You're unique on the internet!

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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Dr. Jean, we probably do need to say this every now and again, just so you will know -

Thanks for all of your insight and taking the time to share your knowledge with us! You are undoubtedly very busy and yet you still take the time to help us and that means a lot to me. Any time you feel like throwing that DVM around, you go right ahead!

May God keep you and bless you.

Peace,
Mike
 

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Im sure everyone appreciates your bright input and knowledge on everything drjean, I certainly do. I hope you keep sticking around! :D
 
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