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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there!
I adopted my 8 year old cat in December from the humane society and she is my literal child. I noticed that she likes to overgroom to a point where her hair is missing and she has sores. I’ve taken her to the vet- and they’ve decided it’s not allergies but just a behavior issue. They prescribed her antibiotics and steroids and just told me to keep her in a cone until her stomach has cleared. I’ve done everything I can think of from rescue calm to a onesie (which she LOATHES). Nothing seems to work. Has anyone dealt with this before?
 

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Did she have this issue prior to living with you? What is your household living condition like? Other people or animals in the house besides you? What is your level of interaction with her? I think something is causing her some anxiety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I’m not sure if she had any issues prior, the humane society did not have much information about her. She does not get along with other cats so she’s the only animal. We do live in a heavily wooded area with tons of wildlife. My husband and myself may possibly spoil her with toys and affection. I have been giving her supplements like omega 3’s, a probiotic and something for her upper respiratory infections she prone to getting. Also we spend way too much money on fancy food so I’m wondering if I should get a second opinion on her diet.
 

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Is she a 100% inside kitty? Did the vet rule out food allergy? Don’t be over affectionate if she doesn’t want to. Only if she comes to you. Don’t pick her up and try to hold her unless she comes to you. Could be that she hears the sounds of other animals and is stressed out by the sounds.
 

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Cleo has had issues with overgrooming off and on during her entire adult life. Every time it comes up, the vet can't figure it out, so I wouldn't worry if you can't narrow it down to a certain cause. Her last battle was a few months ago, and she had licked her underarms almost bald The vet prescribed medication and said to put her in a cone. She wasn't particularly happy, but the onesie was the best option. I also bought this from Amazon: Lively Pets Derma-Soothe, moisturizing oatmeal; Fresh Green Apple Scent. Smells so nice!

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After her surgery, I used an inflatable collar on Cali. But then I switched her to a onesie.

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Inflatable collars come in all shapes and sizes.

Cat Felidae Toy Carnivore Small to medium-sized cats
 

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Hi R. Cats sometimes over-groom when they're in pain even though they may seem fine otherwise because they can hide pain pretty well. With my Kate, she did it because she had undetected dental problems. We saw a new Vet and once she was properly diagnosed and treated, she stopped over-grooming. Just something to consider.

If it is just anxiety, getting her to chase something like a wand toy several times throughout the day can burn off a lot of energy and help her to relax afterwards. Also, you could talk to your Vet about a low dose short term anti-anxiety med after she's finished her treatment and see if she improves.

I'm wondering how your Vet determined it's not allergies. Was she tested? Are there any plants in your house? You could ask them if a change in her diet, litter, or environment might help.
 

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Stanley (aka lanky teenager) Alfie (aka terror of the house) Smudge (aka first of many, RIP)
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I agree with above, pain, stress and allergies could all be contributing.

I just wanted to contribute that an older cat who I adopted did a very similar thing to your girl. He had a very rough life before coming to me and as such developed stress induced OCD. My vet put him on some hormone regulators which worked great, and he stopped overgrooming.
 

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I agree with above, pain, stress and allergies could all be contributing.

I just wanted to contribute that an older cat who I adopted did a very similar thing to your girl. He had a very rough life before coming to me and as such developed stress induced OCD. My vet put him on some hormone regulators which worked great, and he stopped overgrooming.
Now that is interesting. I would not have guessed that hormone regulators would help with stress or OCD. I'll have to remember that. Thanks for the info.
 

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Stanley (aka lanky teenager) Alfie (aka terror of the house) Smudge (aka first of many, RIP)
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Now that is interesting. I would not have guessed that hormone regulators would help with stress or OCD. I'll have to remember that. Thanks for the info.
Weird isn't it? I don't remember the full explanation my vet gave me, but because his condition was caused from his cortisol levels (stress hormone) being in overdrive all the time as a result from prolonged stress, the regulators helped settle those levels to a normal range without making him drowsy.
 
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