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It's not serious! Phew... but it's important to me. if you saw my post over the weekend, i started a new job. It's a rather large company, about 100 people in our office. I have heard from others that there's supposed to be two russian guys working in the IT department, but it's a different section than me. When we walked around and i met everybody, i saw one of them who i thought was the one, but he didn't have an accent, the second one was missing.

Now, I'm not saying all russians are great, but it will be easier if they are, and to meet up quickly and get the low down on teh company and have another group to go out to lunch with. I saw that same guy today at lunch when i was chatting with the girls, and he looked at me, a little too long, and then i thought he might stop by our table, but he didn't.

So, i think i should just go tomorrow out flat, and walk up to either this guy's or the second guy's cubicle and ask them if they're russian. It's straight to the point though, would that be considered rude? My god... i'm so confused! Usually i remember these things being easy, but it's like i'm in kindergarden all over again and you need someone's hand to walk you over and to intruduce you! :lol: :lol:
 

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I can tell you from a foreigner's point of view what it feels like since I have lived here only the past 4 years of my life.
We (people coming from other countries to the USA) are pleasantly surprised with the American easy going way of being. We like the sociable and smiling American who will enquire about our culture, language :D . Apart from that - it will make them(the Russian guys), as foreigners, feel 'included'. SO the way I see it there is nothing to lose but on the contrary.
Come back and tell us how it went :wink:

P.S. Even before I came here one of my Hungarian friends related to me something similar while telling me how visiting her daughter in America was. Her and her daughter were once sitting on a bench speaking in Hungarian. There was an American lady who approached them asking what language that was they were speaking in. Of course, the reply was Hungarian. Upon asking where they were from they said that they were Hungarians living in Romania (we have a huge Hungarian minority - as Mexicans are in the USA). Naturally they told her they could speak Romanian as well
My friend was very pleased with the gentle initiative the American lady took by approaching them :wink:
 

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Personally, I would just introduce myself and let the conversation go from there. Ask them what they do, how long they've worked there. If you then hear an accent then ask if they are from Russia. I think it's more important to get to know each and every person and you'll eventually figure out who's from where.
 

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As said above, I would introduce myself and take a conversation from there. I would feel there is somthing wrong if someone had to come up to
me and ask where I was from if they have never spoke to me before.
 
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