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Situation: got cat in July, fed 1/2 cup of dry and 2.5 oz wet per instruction from humane society.

Around Nov I noticed he wasn't getting any slimmer, quite the contrary. Tried to weigh him on my scale ( holding him and subtracting my weight from that) and even with fluctuations due to movements he seemed to have gained back to 16 from 14.8.

I cut kibble down to 1/3 of a cup and 1/4 of a cup when he got treats from the kids.

Saw the vet in Feb, he's 16 pounds even. She instructed me to feed him diet kibble but no less amount wise because he'd be too hungry, he is a big cat after all.

So now I bought weight maintenance food. Now I got a good deal on wet food and have some surplus cans. How much wet food should I give in exchange for the 1/3 of a cup of weight maintenance food? I have different brands, from friskies to blue buffalo, so I assume he'd get less from higher quality wet food, right?

Just HOW much?

I am not about to start buying the overpriced science diet cans they have at the office, might just as well get friskies for less.:cool

He needs to go down to 14 pounds.
 

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Cats are carnivores and do not need to eat any grains (no soy, corn, rice, barley, wheat). They will gain weight on kibble that has grain content. A high protein good quality canned food is better. Even if your cat will not eat canned, a good quality no-grain kibble is OK (such as Evo Innova), one that is high in protein---you actually will feed less of it than cheaper kibble. Here is an excellent website on cat nutrition.
Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition :: healthy cat diet, making cat food, litter box, cat food, cat nutrition, cat urinary tract health
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Cats are carnivores and do not need to eat any grains (no soy, corn, rice, barley, wheat). They will gain weight on kibble that has grain content. A high protein good quality canned food is better. Even if your cat will not eat canned, a good quality no-grain kibble is OK (such as Evo Innova), one that is high in protein---you actually will feed less of it than cheaper kibble. Here is an excellent website on cat nutrition.
Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition :: healthy cat diet, making cat food, litter box, cat food, cat nutrition, cat urinary tract health

You're making assumptions here, he didn't lose weight on grain free ( and soaked) kibble, either and I am aware of the trends and public opinions on the ideal cat diet.

Unfortunately I still don't know how much wet food I should give him in exchange for the 1/3 of a cup of kibble.
 

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I would say at least a heaping tablespoon of canned or a bit more. Any reduction in food to lose weight should be done very gradually, over several months.
 

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You're making assumptions here, he didn't lose weight on grain free ( and soaked) kibble, either and I am aware of the trends and public opinions on the ideal cat diet.
Kibble in general, even grain-free kibble, is still fairly high in carbs (they simply replace the grains with veggies/roots). And soaking kibble wouldn't change its impact on a cat's weight at all, since the ingredients remain the same.

Canned is definitely the way to go (preferably grain-free or low-carb canned, without any simple carbs like corn) if you're hoping for weight loss. When I completely eliminated all kibble from my first cat's diet, he slimmed down nicely.

And there's really no one answer for how much to feed him. That varies from cat to cat. When my cats eat canned, they get 5.5 oz a day (I split a 5.5 oz can between them each meal). But how much your cat needs will depend on his size, age, and individual metabolism.
 

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According to the National Academy of Sciences, an overweight 15 lb cat needs 280 calories every day.

You need to find calorie content of the wet food you're feeding him (the kind I use has 175 calories per 7 oz tin, so you would need to feed him 11 oz of wet food if we used the same brand - but that entirely depends on the brand of food you buy.) I agree with others it would be for the best to switch to canned only, but with caloric info of both dry and wet food you buy for him, it should be easy to count how much of either food to use.
 

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OK I've just googled Blue Buffalo, and 280 calories is 8.5 oz of their Turkey and Chicken Entree, so that's one of their 5.5 oz cans and one 3 oz can. Other flavors have different calorie content so you should make these calculations for the specific flavor you buy, it will vary. Their site is very informative so you can calculate it pretty easily. You could also try mixing the food with a little warm water, the cat will eat it more slowly then (from my experience) and hopefully will feel full sooner.
 

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As def kitty has pointed out, you need to check the calorie counts of the foods you're feeding, and those stats should be printed on the packaging. If not, you should be able to find that info on the manufacturers' websites. Then the comparisons between amounts of wet and dry are just a matter of math.

Fewer calories = weight loss. It is important, though, for your cat to lose weight slowly and steadily. Rapid weight loss can be dangerous for cats. When I was taking weight off of my feline fatties, I liked to see .2-.4 lb loss every two weeks. I bought a digital baby scale and weighed each cat every two weeks (still do), charting their weights in a spreadsheet on my computer. If a cat lost less than .2 lb in two weeks, I reduced his/her food portion a little. If a cat lost more than .4 lb in two weeks, I increased the food portion a little. I've been doing that for nearly three years now, tweaking food portions as necessary every two weeks to maintain optimal weights on my cats.

There is no set number of calories that every cat of a given weight should eat. Food portions start with general guidelines and are then adjusted according to the individual cat's needs.

Laurie
 
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