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Hi there,

I'm hoping that people might be able to help me with our cat. She is a lilac tortie Burmese who answers to 'Elf'.
She has lived with me since she was a kitten and is a great cat. The first 5 years she lived with me, I worked from home so we spent a lot of time together. I now work monday to friday and for the past 7 years or so she has also shared the house with my partner (5th wedding aniversary is next weekend!).

The problem I have is this - she has always been a house cat with a litter tray. She has always slept on my bed - even when my partner/wife moved in with me (who is allergic to cats!). She is now 13 years old - has lost most of her teeth and is on a u/o Royal Canin diet because of crystal 'issues' in her urine - she also has a feliway plug. We are now expecting our first (or is that second?) baby at the beginning of March; as a consequence I need to stop Elf sleeping in our bedroom as that is where the baby and cot will be. I can't see a way around this but I would like to do it in the most effective but kindest and least traumatic way.

What would you suggest?

:cat
 

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Re home the furless child before it enters the house. No crib, no problem.










:yellbounce

Sorry, couldn't help it.
ANyway, why can't the cat be in the same room with the crib? My nephew spent tons of nights as an infant at Grandma's house in a crib and she had a cat. I'd think kittie would stay away from the squalling smelly hairless creature.

You could look for an extra tall baby gate and put it on the bedroom door. Tall enough she can't jump over. It wouldn't go to waste, you'll need one for the kid anyway at some point.
 

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I would never leave a baby unattended with an adult cat. Asking for trouble.

Sorry I don't have any suggestions on how to re bed her other than start before the baby comes and by the time bubs arrives hopefully kitty will be fully re bedded.
 

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The biggest reason behind not keeping them in the same room isn't trust, it's cuddling.

Babies in their cribs are warm soft and snuggly. You shouldn't put pillows or blankets in a newborn's crib for fear of suffocation. Imagine what a well-meaning cat could accidentally do.

I would start retraining your cat now - close the bedroom door when you sleep. Ignore the meows to go in. Give extra attention in rooms other than your bedroom. Having a baby means very little sleep. You don't want a cat that won't stop meowing at the same time as a crying baby. You'll all go insane!

When the child is old enough to support itself (lift head, roll over, etc) it becomes less of a concern.
 

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I would do what rightsaidfed suggested and start getting the cat sleeping outside your bedroom now. Go ahead and start shutting the cat out of your room. It may be easier than you think. I had two cats when my son was born and they had very little interest in him, even though they had loved sleeping on top of my belly when I was pregnant. Also consider getting a new window perch or a cat tree if you don't have one and set up a new spot somewhere fun like by a window or in the main living area. This will also give the cat somewhere it likes to go once your baby is crawling if it wants to get away.
 

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The biggest reason behind not keeping them in the same room isn't trust, it's cuddling.

Babies in their cribs are warm soft and snuggly. You shouldn't put pillows or blankets in a newborn's crib for fear of suffocation. Imagine what a well-meaning cat could accidentally do.

I would start retraining your cat now - close the bedroom door when you sleep. Ignore the meows to go in. Give extra attention in rooms other than your bedroom. Having a baby means very little sleep. You don't want a cat that won't stop meowing at the same time as a crying baby. You'll all go insane!

When the child is old enough to support itself (lift head, roll over, etc) it becomes less of a concern.
Good advice given here. :)
 

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There's always one of those motion detecting air blaster things that spray air at your cat as soon as it walks past it. I've never used one of those before but I saw it on My Cat From **** :) Maybe someone here who's used one before can chime in?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The child gate will be used for the kitchen - which as well as keeping the little one away from the oven and cleaning materials mean I can move the cat's food and water in there to keep that safe from the little one. (Which does mean I need to find one that she can either jump over or squeeze through the bars - which as she has put on some weight recently..... A skinny Burmese now at 3.6 Kg....)

The air blasters sound like a good idea - however I think a total ban is the best solution. Once the baby is big enough to look after itself then the cat can come back in.
So as i already have Feliway the consensus is just close the door and ignore the scratching and meowing? *sigh* OK.
 

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I had 2 kids and my cats never did anything to them. Lyra slept with melissa once but it was so cute. I didn't take the cat out. My cats never harmed my kids.

Kathy
 

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Why are the humans not fixed?

Signed,

Cleo :blackcat
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Last night was her first night in her room in her hammock.


There was some meowing and a little door scratching. But not as bad as I thought it would be.

She seemed quite happy in the morning - no sulking or pouting. My wife had to work (rare on a Saturday) so I drove her and brought Elf along. She enjoyed the car ride and the car stereo. I made a fuss with some wet food and she is good.

:cat
 

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Wow! That sounds awesome. I'm glad it's working out so easily so far. It sounds like your girl is very easygoing. I need to get my kitten used to car rides. He freaks out and pants on the way to the vet and that's only 4 miles away!
 

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Cats smothering children is an old wife's tale. Good luck though.
 

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One of my earliest and most cherished memories is of taking a nap at my great great grandmother's house in one of those old fashioned cribs. I woke to the sound of a purring cat who had jumped into the crib and snugged up against my back while I was asleep. Mom told me I was about 11 months old at the time.

It is a good thing to be cautious about the baby as long as it is unable to lift it's own head and reposition it just in case the cat gets too buddy buddy and sleeps up against their face, but once the child is able to control their head and especially after the baby can roll over on their own, they are safe to be around cats. A purring cat for me is one of the absolute best sleep aides when I have insomnia.
 
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