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First off, hello all, now I'll just cut right to the chase.

So, I've been researching a raw diet for my dog for over a year, he will be started on that come summer when I get a new job. My research has been extensive on the dog front, and he is already on a half raw diet. So I know enough about RAW that I'm not a completely newbie. I also know cats are pure carnivores.

Now, my mom's cat is sick. He keeps getting crystals, and it's to the point that he may need to be put down because it just can't be afforded anymore, vet fees are rediculous, over 1500 so far in the last month. Now mother loves this cat, they are very bonded, he follows her around like a puppy, she's never been more attached to an animal I think, so don't say we don't love this animal, just when the money isn't there you can't do anything.

First time, he got sick it was the basic blockage, a month later a bit worst and he started peeing everywhere. Vet prescribed some new food (pshh, I don't know what it is, don't live at home, but I don't have faith in it, and results are showing me I shouldn't). Now he's been vomiting on and off a week, eats and drinks less and still peeing everywhere (which is good right?).

I've read a lots of the FLUTD problems are cause by water intake. Cats come from desert areas, evolved to drink less water due to climate, natural diet is raw meat where most water intake is from, nowadays cats still drink less but are on crappy food therefore this causes problems... So I'm thinking RAW is definetely the answer!

But.. here's the thing, he's sick now, mom is debating what to do, bring him to the vet to get treated or to be put down. Let's say he gets treated, might only work for a week before he acts up again, so how would I go to transition a sick cat to RAW? The vet already changed his food once but just to different kibble (which could'of caused some probs too), so it's kind a go for it now... If I can present mom with a long term solution she probably will get him treated, but how to transition as quick and smoothly as possible?

He's 5 or 6 years old by the way and was otherwise always healthy until a few months ago. Long but thanks for sticking around.
 

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I'm sorry to hear that. I can imagine what you're going through. Regular vets charge a LOT of money. They are expensive and they rip you off sometimes. My regular vet asked 1,500 dollars for heartworm treatment on my dog, whereas the Humane Society I volunteer at charged me 200 dollars. Do you know if there is a humane society clinic in your area? There should be. They are very low cost and are willing to help. Money is tight which is why I go to the humane society sometimes, I save a LOT of money. They charge 17 dollars for just an exam fee! If your cat is sick and you just can't afford medication then maybe you should consider a low cost clinic instead of giving up completely? The humane society I go to provides great services and is probably more equipped than regular vets.

I also believe that raw is probably the best thing for your FLUTD kitty. Cats originated in desert climates and their bodies are designed to extract moisture from their food (prey). They simply cannot get enough water by drinking from a bowl to compensate for what they DON'T get with dry food. That is why dry food diets are suspected as the reason so many cats have kidney and urinary tract diseases. I am a complete newbie but I am sure experts on here would recommend the same.
 

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I would venture to say that transitioning a sick kitty over to raw would be much like regular transitions except to keep a closer eye on him and transition at a slower pace.

If he refuses the food don't skip meals, give him what he is usually eating but offer him raw for the first 15 minutes or so. It maybe better to get him on wet first, but if that is a no go, try sprinkling crushed bits of dry on small pieces of raw skinless/boneless meat. Go light, maybe chicken meat first.

Some vets are opposed to raw feeding, if this is your vet, you can always say you are trying a holistic approach to his diet.
 
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