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Hello all! My name is Aaron and I am new to this site (one of my cats is named Reggie). My parents have a male cat named Malcolm. He is at least 3 years old, maybe a little older, but I honestly cannot remember exactly how old he is. He is neutered and is an indoor cat.

Now for his problem, which is not the best topic in the world. In the past 6 months or so he recently started developing crystals in his urinary tract. The first time he had to go in and have a cathodor placed in him to unblock his urniary tract. So 6 months go by and it happened again and the same procedure had to be done. My parents have researched this topic a great deal and whatever they are doing is still not working. I am hoping some of you have dealt with this problem successfully and might have some advice on diet. My parents are thinking of going completely to wet food, which may or may not help. My dad hopes that with wet food being high in water, that will help, as well as wet food having less carbs than dry food. Any thoughts on this?

I know this ailment affects about 1 in 4 cats, especially male, neutered, indoor cats. I too have a male car and would hate for this to happen to him.

Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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Is Malcolm on a prescription diet now? My cat - a female (I've never heard that males are any more susceptible to urinary tract problems - other people here might know more) developed a mild urinary tract infection and the vet found crystals in her urine and she's been on a special diet since them (it's been maybe 2 years now). She has both the wet and dry form of Hill's Prescription diet c/d and has not had any problems since then.

This article from the Little Big Cat site has a lot of information on urinary tract disorders - definitely worth a read:
http://littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=017
 

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Hi Aaron. MY cat went through this horrible thing a few months ago. I switched to an all wet food diet, and have had no problems since. You have to get rid of dry food completely. Don't feed prescription food too long or they develop another type of stone. I agree with ospunkyo, go to Dr. Jeans' site, and read up. Good Luck!

Aaron
 

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Thanks for the info! It is good to have. Malcolm is not on any prescription food, but my dad wants to put him on a wet food-only diet to get more water in his body. Plus, wet food has more meat and cats are naturally carnivorous.

As far as knowing if your cat has crystals - your cat will show signs of being "off". In Malcolm's case, he was very lethargic and would urinate outside his littler box and eventually was unable to urinate. Your cat will definitely act different if he develops crystals.

And as far as male cats more likely to develop crystals - this is just what my vet told me and what my father discovered, so I am merely repeating what I have been told. Who knows if it is a true medical finding.
 

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BTW, I called my dad to check on Malcolm and he is still at the vet going through the proceudre to flush out his urinary tract. But he is doing well. I went to littlebigcat.com and got some great info. I actually bought the article on FLUTD for my own benefit. But one thing my dad mentioned is that Malcolm may have came under additional stress from going on a trip with my parents to their property in East Texas. Before the trip Malcolm was fine, but then he developed problems again in the middle of the trip. Maybe it's coincidental, but I really doubt it. Just some food for thought.
 

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Stress is a big contributor to urinary tract problems. I beleive thats what triggered my cats blockage when I was painting inside the house and moving furniture around. Also males are more prone because the urethra is narrower.

Aaron
 

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Hi Aaron, I hope you liked the FLUTD article and learned a lot! :)

This ailment actually affects only about 3 in 100 cats; and males and females equally. However, only males block, and that's why it is a scarier (and more obvious!) disease in male cats.

Feeding all wet food is definitely the best preventative. Do avoid fish flavors, though; a lot of FLUTD cats react badly to fish.

After removing 40 calcium oxalate stones from a cat who ate c/d for 10 years (who didn't even need it; it was his brother who once had a problem), I was always *very* cautious about feeding c/d (or similar diets) long term. I won't go more than 6 months (if I put them on it at all, which is very rare).

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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Dr Jean, what exactly is in c/d and s/d that "takes care of" stones?

Kota is on s/d now for her bladder stone (it is working, her stone is almost gone) and the vet said that he would put her on c/d once this stone is totally gone. I would very much prefer to have Kota and Stix on a food they can both eat together, because trying to seperate them at dinnertime is a pain.

I read a post on here from someone who said that their vet recommended c/d to prevent future stones also, but they have been feeding Nutro and have never had a problem or another stone. I was planning on asking my vet if there is just a certain ingredient I should be looking for/avoiding in order to be able to feed both kitties the same food and keep Kota from getting stones at the same time.

Well....I know I should have done this first, but I am going to read that article now. Dont mind me if all the answers are there, hehe... :p
 

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drjean said:
Hi Aaron, I hope you liked the FLUTD article and learned a lot! :)

This ailment actually affects only about 3 in 100 cats; and males and females equally. However, only males block, and that's why it is a scarier (and more obvious!) disease in male cats.

Feeding all wet food is definitely the best preventative. Do avoid fish flavors, though; a lot of FLUTD cats react badly to fish.

After removing 40 calcium oxalate stones from a cat who ate c/d for 10 years (who didn't even need it; it was his brother who once had a problem), I was always *very* cautious about feeding c/d (or similar diets) long term. I won't go more than 6 months (if I put them on it at all, which is very rare).

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
Wow, 3 in 100! That's a tad bit less than the 1 in 4 my vet told me. I have heard that some fish flavored wet foods have higher ash and potassium content which can trigger urinary tract illnesses. The article, BTW, was very good and I learned a lot. In fact, you have some great info on the site in general.
 
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