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Discussion Starter #1
Found this in a book I'm reading... Add your suggestions - good/bad/indifferent?
Sprinkle one-quarter teaspoon in food for kittens and triple this amount for a mature cat every day.

1/4 cup food yeast
1/4 cup brewer's yeast
1/4 cup wheat bran
1/4 cup kelp powder
1/4 cup beet-root-juice powder
1/4 cup barley powder
1/4 cup lecithin granules
1/4 cup bonemeal, calcium lactate, or calcium gluconate
 

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You will find, that a lot of the good quality foods out there already include those ingredients in the foods themselves.
Otherwise there are simple suppliments you can buy specifically for cats/dogs which have the same properties.

Would you mind sharing the title and author of the book?
 

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AngelZoo said:
You will find, that a lot of the good quality foods out there already include those ingredients in the foods themselves.

Otherwise there are simple suppliments you can buy specifically for cats/dogs which have the same properties.
1) Forgive me for not trusting food labels :wink: and
2) I bet you pay a premium price for those supplements. My guess would be 5 times more than if you make the mix yourself.
 

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This book doesn't have a great reputation.

I checked his "recipe" against those of more established authors such as Dr. Pitcairn; the proportions appear to be quite different.

I'm not a big fan of yeast for cats (or dogs!), since allergies can result from it.

If you're feeding commercial cat food, it would be unnecessary and probably harmful to add such a supplement; I'd guess that it's intended to be used with raw meat to balance the diet. Commercial cat foods already contain an excess of many minerals as well as iodine, which would all be made worse with this recipe.

Cheers,
Dr. Jean
 

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While I know that Dr. John Heinerman is a medical anthropologist, and that he has written many books for human diets, often encouraging a mostly vegan style.

What I don't know is his experience with companion animals.

In addition to what Dr. Jean noted. Some pets also have considerable allergies to wheat products. On a proper diet, pets shouldn't need suppliments.

In what reference is he instructing that you feed this to your cats? Could you show a little more of the context surrounding the recipe?
 

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Hmm... that link to the reciepe, personally doesn't look all that great to me.

1.) I don't tend to think that beef is the best choice for cats. Chicken or Turkey would be a better choice.
2.) Adding fish into foods can often cause a food addiction, in which case it can be extremely hard to ever get them to eat anything else if you ever had to, this can lead to problems.
3.) I don't like to see dairy (cheese) products in cat food as most cats are lactose intolerant. Not only can it cause tummy upset, diahrea, but for some pain and discomfort as well.
4.) This recipe seems to include more rice/oatmeal then meat. Not sufficiant for cats.
5.) So far with the studies on garlic, it doesn't seem to be something to put into cats food with the problems it may cause. However, if it's only the extract, I'm not sure if that is better or worse. My thinking is that it's a more condenced and there for more powerfull form.
6.) The molasses serves no real purpose other then palatability, which some cats I've found, including mine, don't even like the taste of.
7.) I am unware of any benifits of beet ROOT juice powder. Not to say there isn't any, only that I have never seen it used.
8.) Is he suggesting any vitamin/mineral suppliment to be used with this?

These are just a couple things off the top of my head real quick, but it is time for bed now :)

But thank you for saying it was for a RAW diet, that makes more sense.
 
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