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Discussion Starter #1
Soooo, today was 'shopping to get everything needed to set up the tank perfectly day' which came to a grand total of about $120 8O We got rocks, we got plants (live and fake) we got substrate! We went to the local aquarium store since they are very well known around here to actually know *** they are talking about soooo we got sand substrate, the guy said it would be very 'dusty' and that we would have to do several water changes afterward. By several we though 2...maybe 3. Were on the fifth water change, and the water is still so cloudy you can't see more than an inch in :roll: Now what? Keep doing water changes or drain the tank, remove the substrate, and buy gravel?
 

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That's what I'd be tempted to do. However, if you want the more natural substrate, there is a water clarifier which will remove that cloudiness. I have never used sand personally. I would not add the fish for a while after adding the clarifier, however. I used it only once, and had a beautifully clear tank full of dead and dying fish. Evidently the bottle had a larger dropper than it should have. The experts at the aquarium store duplicated the conditions, fish, etc., and added the water clarifier, and those fish also died.

You know, when you think of it, the water near the shore of the ocean is also somewhat cloudy....I'm sure you could find something else that would look natural. What a shame. :( All that work..and if you're like me, you want to do it RIGHT NOW! Darn, darn, darn and other bad words. :(
 

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I would dump the whole thing and thouroughly rinse the substrate. This helped a friend of mine. You'll have to start over, but the cloudiness should clear up much faster.
 

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I'd let it settle for a day or two. Turn on all your filters and that will also help. If you continue with water changes or take jessamica8's advice and start over, put a bowl on the bottom of the tank and pour the water into (over) it so it doesn't disturb the sand.
 

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We use sand in our salt water tank. It is very cloudy at first. Just set up all of your filters, powerheads, etc. and let the tank run for a couple of days as Annissa said. It will all settle. We've never done multiple water changes after putting in sand. All that will do is stir up the sand particles even more.

Good luck!
 

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carbon works wonders on clearing up the water and it doesn't harm anything. I've had a saltwater/reef for almost 5 years now and whenever I do a little algae scraping off the walls, I just place a carbon pack in my skimmer and just remove it the next day.

What kind of set-up is it? If is freshwater, then like Annissa said, turn on your filters, they should have all that stuff in them already.
 

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Clarity of water in newly established aquariums is usually accomplished in commercial setting through something like diatomic filteration. A good diatomic filter is expensive, but effective. The early cloudiness, is generally from suspended particles, and microbial activity. As the system begins to age and goes through it's progression of balancing modes, you'll continue for awhile with cloudy water. It'll eventually become balanced and clear. Until then, you can use a water polisher like a diatomic filter, or one of the chemical solutions that cause the suspended particles to clump together. That permits more traditional filters to remove the suspensions.

Generally, when you quit fighting it, and let it do it's thing, it'll start clearing. That's often at the point you throw your hands up and say "I give up". :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah we did a 6th water change and it started looking a little better, so we started the filters, put in some clear water stuff, and went to bed. This morning its crystal clear. Now my question is.....how do I rearrange the sand (its much thicker near the front of the tank than the back) and how do I clean off all the rocks and plants that got covered in sand while the sandstorm was going on without causing yet another sandstorm?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Another question thats been bugging me totally unrelated to this whole situation. he Live coral etc that they sell in stores....do they harvest that from the ocean? Cause thats pretty bad imo if they do, considering like 80% of people who buy aquariums give it up after a few months/years and stop taking care of it. When fish die people say "Eh it was just a fish" When my fish die i'm actually sad =(. I used to have this Oscar, I got him when he was a baby and he lived happily in my ten gallon tank for a few months. Then he grew....so I bought a 20 gallon, he grew again...and up to a 55 gallon he went. Along the way I got MANY many smaller tanks just to house his favorite foods, guppies, brine shrimp, goldfish etc. When he got too big for that I ended up giving him to someone who had an indoor pond and last I heard he was happily swimming around at 18" long. (I gave him away when he was about 9" long. Coral is a living thing, its a being, and depleting the oceans of their coral so hobbyists can look at them for a while seems so bad 8(
 
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Payge said:
Live coral etc that they sell in stores....do they harvest that from the ocean?

Payge - I've been told that the coral, etc is not harvested from the ocean. Supposedly there are commercial "coral farms" so to speak that grow the live coral for aquariums.

When my fish die i'm actually sad
I know how you feel when fish die. My oscar that I rescued from a nasty LFS died last night. I'd had him for a year. It looks so weird having an empty tank.
 

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Some coral is harvested from the ocean and some aren't. I've gotten all mine from coral propagation, the fragging of the mother colony from other hobbiest. They generally give away a small piece of it will eventually grow into another colony, to be fragged again, so and so on. So to answer your question, no, most of them aren't. It goes the same for fish, some are tank raised and some are wild caught. Saltwater hobbiest realize this and feel the same as you I do.


I've learned so much throught out the years but the most important thing was to research, especially before adding chemicals that really aren't necessary. You really should have let you tank cycle naturally. Did you test the water params? How do you know it was cycled? I definitely suggest buying a GOOD test kit if you already haven't.

You should be able to just brush the sand lightly with your hand to level it out without stirring it up too much now. You can also use a turkey baster to blast off any sand on your decorations.
 

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murried2 said:
Payge said:
Live coral etc that they sell in stores....do they harvest that from the ocean?

Payge - I've been told that the coral, etc is not harvested from the ocean. Supposedly there are commercial "coral farms" so to speak that grow the live coral for aquariums.

When my fish die i'm actually sad
I know how you feel when fish die. My oscar that I rescued from a nasty LFS died last night. I'd had him for a year. It looks so weird having an empty tank.
Just want to say that I am sorry to hear about your fish dying....I know how you feel...I had a beta for almost 2 years that was beautiful and I really missed him when he was gone....seeing the empty bowl was so sad. :( (he was just in a goldfish bowl)
 
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