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We have a 7 yr old female Norwegian Forest Cat. She was first diagnosed with diabetes (GLU 473) two weeks ago. Her only symptom was more thirst and more urination than usual. Right then the vet wanted us to start insulin but we resisted and wanted to put her on a diabetic prescription diet hoping that and weight loss would help. She's a couple of pounds overweight at 16lbs. We took her today for a blood glucose test and it was still high at 472. But it's only been two weeks.

Is two weeks enough time to get any results? At 472 are we risking her health even though she now has no symptoms? The thirst is back to normal yet the numbers are still high. Any insight would be greatly appreciated. We're so worried. The vet has us scared. She even made us sign a legal waiver!
 

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Franny -- best cat ever! purring in my heart Porch cat THE DIVIT aka Divey seriously traumatized
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Let's look at what signing a waiver means for the vet -- I found this Legal protection when a veterinary client says "no"

Q: If a client refuses our pet care recommendations and signs a waiver, how protected is my practice legally?

"A waiver of compliance is usually accepted by veterinary license boards as confirmation that a particular outcome couldn't be attained because the client didn't let the veterinarian do the recommended procedure," says Dr. Karl Salzsieder, JD, a Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member and owner of Salzsieder Consulting and Legal Services in Kelso, Wash.

Asking you to sign the waiver is a statement that your decision of treatment via diet does not hold a high probability of meeting your desired outcome. The vet is creating a legal record to protect his practice.
However, Dr. Salzsieder points out that a license board's acceptance of the waiver also has to do with the client's understanding. If the board finds that the client didn't fully understand the risk of harm to their pet, then the waiver may be deemed ineffective. So the form must be accompanied by your explanation of the patient's risk of harm.

"Instead of asking clients if they have any questions, ask them to explain it back to you," says Salzsieder. "If they can't, then they don't understand."

The client's understanding and the formality of the form go hand in hand to decrease the liability risk from a lawsuit. Every practice should use the forms when possible, but they are only risk-prevention devices, says Dr. Salzsieder.
 
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