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I have had Rosey since 1998 when I took her in from being a stray. I had her fixed and front declawed. In this time I have moved three times. The most recent move last March to a house. She up to this point was only in apartments. She had only vomited once in my second apartment. She had vomited once here a couple of months ago, but last evening and today has vomited. It is very out of the ordinary for her and I'm not sure what could be wrong. There is nothing in her routine that has changed. Food hasn't changed. Her personality is completely the same. The only difference I am noticing in the vomiting. I'm not sure what could be wrong. Please help. :?
 

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Yup it could be worms or something that she may have eaten that is causing her to throw up. Its hard to pinpoint what it is, so you need to take the cat to the vet so that you can rule out anything wrong internally with the kitty. Cats are very sensitive to things so please get it checked out. Let us know how it goes or if the cat still is throwing up. Good Luck :p
 

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Are there any other symptoms? It is not always something horrible....just use caution.
Jerry throws up sometimes because he eats to fast. He has done this since he was a baby. Its only every once in awhile. It really doesnt do him any harm....just the carpet. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Possability

My husband, the more sensible one when it comes to Rosey asked if I had changed the type of canned food I've been giving her. I feed her in the morning, and she grazes throughout the day. She started scratching a lot when winter hit and the heater was turned on, so besides her dry food and water I started giving her a little canned food in the morning also. I thought orginally when he asked this question that I had just finished a package. I realized we had just started a new package. Apparently something with this flavor has her out of wack, the type has never changed. This is the only type of canned food I've ever given her. She also tends to eat VERY fast. To the point I'm surprised she doesn't get sick. She runs upstairs with me in the morning and has been bypassing the dry food in the morning for the canned. I'm laying off the canned for a while to see what happens. I'm watching her very cautiously and will keep you updated. Thanks so much.
 

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Hi,
My cat had a similar problem. he would throw up alot and I couldnt figure out why so I took him to the vet and it turned out that he had an absessed tooth and he wasn't chewing his food all the way cuz his tooth hurt too much. Look in your cats mouth too see if you can see anything unusual. It could be just the food but better to be safe than sorry. Hope this helps you!
 

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Cats can get stomach bugs just like us, that cause vomiting and/or diarrhea. They should pass within a day. You shouldn't feed a vomiting cat for 12 hours, and offer him ice cubes rather than water during that time period. If he vomits after eating when you resume feeding, it's time for a vet visit. But if any other symptoms develop, get him to the vet even before the 12 hours is up. You don't want to delay treatment for something that could be more serious than a passing virus.

A change in diet has to be pretty significant to cause vomiting in cats, usually. They're not as sensitive as dogs. So merely rotating flavors, etc., usually will not cause a problem.

Stomach problems from worms usually cause frothy vomit, and sometimes worms in the vomit, if you're lucky! Vomit from a virus or secondary to another illness is usually clear, frothy, or yellow/green. These are the most serious cases and can't be ignored. Watch cautiously, as you are, withhold the cat's food, and report to a vet if there's no improvement today.

Normally, if eating too fast is to blame, the cat will vomit up partially digested food. This is actually regurgitation and not vomiting. Regurgitation is not an emergency and doesn't require fasting. It's usually due to eating too fast or not chewing enough. The stomach can't handle all that digestion on its own. It needs the teeth and saliva to do their jobs first, so the stomach sends food back up to be properly broken down. Other times, there may be a faulty valve or poor muscle function that allows food to empty back into the esophagus from the stomach, or sometimes a dip in the esophagus can prevent food from even getting to the stomach. For regurgitation, the best treatment is to feed small portions of food several times a day to prevent gobbling. Canned food is best for these cats, or you should find a dry food with small pieces, so they'll be easier to digest. Also, raising the food dish will keep food going in the right direction if poor muscle function is to blame. If regurgitation continues, some heavy testing might be needed to get to the bottom of it.
 
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