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Discussion Starter #1
hello all i have a female persian kitten named sassy she is just 5 months old i know its too early think about but i am planing breed her and i want to be prepared for it , i want her to enjoy motherhood atleast once and i was planning to get one more kitten in future but if i will breed sassy i can keep her kitten with me only, i want to know that is it a good idea to breed a cat at home what are the pros and cons of it and what precaution i need to take regarding it, what is the perfect age for a cat to have babies, sassy is on fully raw diet exept few treats during grooming time hope to get reply soon thanks.
 

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I'd say wait until she's at least 2 years old. YOu want to make sure she's mature enough and large enough to have kittens.

In the meantime you'll have PLENTY of work to do to prepare for a breding. You'll want to start entering her in some shows. You want to make sure that she's a positive example of her breed and that her kittens will improve the breed. Otherwise, she shouldn't be bred and should be spayed. It's irresponsible to breed 'pet' quality purebreds. It just brings down the quality of the breed.

Once she's won a few shows and she's proven herself an excellent example of her breed you should discuss with her breeder what would be the best male to compliment her genetics, again, that will improve the breed.

That said, a cat isn't like a human who pines for babies and feels the emotional need for children. WHILE they are in heat they feel a biological need to BREED but it's just that. She can live a fulfilled healthy life without ever having kittens.
 

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Cats don't yern to have babies, all they have are instinctual urges to mate. They are not like a person.

You would be contributing to the serious overpopulation of cats in the world - every cat birthed is a cat already born that won't find a home.

In fact, some cats do not have a mothering instinct at all. They will not nurse the babies. This happens often when the mother is too young. Are you prepared if she will not nurse them or if a kitten is unwell and must be nursed? They require to be fed every one to two hours around the clock, then you must also make sure they pee. It is extremely time consuming and essentially the only way to be prepared for this is to be at home 24/7 or be able to bring all kittens to work. You will need a heating pad, an eye dropper, blankets and kitten formula before the birth to be prepared for this outcome.

2 years old is for sure the age you should wait for, before then they are too young and their bodies are still maturing -- to breed before then is taking away from your own cats growing, takes a larger toll on them and opens up a lot more complications during the birthing... and would make all her energy go into giving birth when she is still a kitten herself. In the meantime, she will go into heat every two weeks or so and yell and scream and try EVERYTHING to get outside and in general drive you crazy, and may start peeing on things, and it will not be a fun state for her to be in.

Before breeding you want to do ALL genetic testing. Breeding a cat with genetic problems is irresponsible. Persians especially have a lot of genetic problems to watch out for.

Another serious problem with Persians is that the kittens may need to be c-sectioned. Their heads can be too big for the birthing cannal in the Persian breed and this can kill the mother and kittens. C-sections are extremely expensive, so I hope you are prepared if this happens.
 

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I agree with everything the others have said, especially the points re overpopulation and genetics. Also I just recently read (someone correct me if this isn't true) that spaying before age 1 can reduce the risk of mammary cancer by almost 90%. I'd recommend to do some research into that as well.
With so many cats in need for a home, if you want more, why not go to a shelter and give an already born kitten a chance rather than putting yours through the stress and potential risk of pregnancy.


Sent from Petguide.com App
 

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Sameer,
Also in agreement with what others are saying here!
Sassy is a Gorgeous little Girl and I'm sure you want to do what will keep her healthy and happy for all her years she can have with you! :)
 

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I agree with everything that's been said.

Birthing kittens is not without risk of major complications and even death. Are you prepared to put Sassy's life at risk for her to have kittens? What kind of vet care do you have available in India? Do you have an emergency vet available 24 hours a day within a reasonable distance (10-15 minutes)? Will you have the funds to deal with a major issue? If you were in the US I would suggest having at least $5K stashed away for complications. That would be in addition to all the up front costs...genetic tests, stud fees, vet bills during pregnancy etc. If the kittens need to be bottled fed, can you or someone else stay home with them for 3-4 weeks?

I realize I'm throwing out worst case scenarios, but it all needs to be considered and planned for.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thanks every one for responding i never thought that there will so many complications in it
 

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To breed a Persian with another Persian can be troublesome. Often the Persian heads are too large for the cat to deliver a litter vaginally, and the kittens must be removed by C-Section by a vet=$$$. English Bulldog breeders have the same problem.
 
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