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Maybe it's just because I don't have kids but I think the country is getting rather tacky about certain things. It seems I am now constantly ask from co-workers to buy something for their kids fundraisers (aren't the kids suppose to be doing this--not the parents?) invitations to weddings where I don't even know the bride or groom, birthday parties for kids I never met and the latest and greatest...
A co-worker tacked up one invitation on the wall and as I walked by he pointed to it and ask if I was going to his daughters babtism (2 years old). I don't socalize with these people outside of work and don't even see them very often because I work out of my home and only go in for about an hour maybe twice a week. It seems they are just trying to hit me up for gifts (which I use to give, but no more). When I rode in the Tour de Cure and ask for donations for the diabetes association, no one even gave me a dime. How would you handle this?
 

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I can't stand it when people do fundraising for their kids. I know that many people will tell you that they "have" to b/c it's not safe for kids to do it in their neighborhoods but at least have your child come in and do it in your office! Aye yay yay. As a Girl Scout, my parents never sold cookies for me in their offices. I actually think it's unethical for someone who is in any type of leadership role within a company to ask subordinates to buy stuff for a child's fundraiser.

As for mass invitations like that, and let me say that I agree that this practice is ubertacky, I would just politely decline, and would not give them a gift.

For donations to causes like Walk for a Cure, Tour de Cure (which sounds so neat! What organization does that?), Relay for Life, etc. I normally give $5 and say that it's my standard practice.

When my friends are in events like that, though, I give much more.
 

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I agree with you 100%, it is getting out of hand. I know my in-laws who rarely visit anyone except their immediate family have big bashes for their kids birthdays, when they were both 1 and 2 years old. They rent a hall and invite all these people they rarely see and since the child is not old enough to enjoy the party it looks like a gift grab.

On your side of things I think all the situations are inappropriate to be doing at work, if you really feel the need to bring fundraising to work, post it or leave the chocolate bars out to buy rather then hound people you never speak to. I always feel obligated when asked to my face and I don't like that at all!

I did a fundraiser to help save rescue dogs and only asked those that I am friends with at work. I just can't see asking for money from someone you barely know.
 

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There's also a growing trend of people who throw "parties" that are really scams for selling merchandise. Unsuspecting guests accept an invitation and plan to spend a normal, social evening at someone's home. Instead, they're subjected to a hard-sell pitch for household goods, clothing, cosmetics, or other products.

I know a few people who have actually have the presence of mind to get up and walk out. Most people, though, are too polite or shy -- and too shocked by what's going on -- to cause a scene. They sit through the sales presentation and, all too often, buy something simply because they feel so uncomfortable.
 

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Oh don't even get me started on these so-called "parties". Grrrr. And the bad thing about it is that the "friend" who is throwing this "party" is trying to drum up the business so they can get some small freebie for themselves.
 

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And the bad thing about it is that the "friend" who is throwing this "party" is trying to drum up the business so they can get some small freebie for themselves.
Sometimes, it's for little freebie stuff. Other times, it's for real cash compensation.

A few years ago, one of our male friends got married. His new wife invited me to their house for a Saturday afternoon tea party. I was thrilled to be included, and I got all dressed up for the party. When I arrived, I was surprised to see that I was the only guest (!). Then, I looked around and noticed that there were no beverages or food (who the heck throws a party without refreshments?). Bride told me that two other ladies would be joining us. They arrived; they were Amway sales representatives, there to give me a product demonstration. If I'd bought anything from them, Bride would have received a cash commission.

No, I didn't buy a single thing. Yes, I got the heck out of there. Yes, I lost my long-time friend over this incident.
 

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I think it's stupid for people to sell stuff for their kids at work, much less hound people, but I don't mind if they let people know they're selling them if they're interested. Example: A guy in our office has a girl scout and put a note up on his door that cookies were available if anyone was interested. Of course everyone loves the cookies so he got some orders, but he never mentioned it in person, never sent emails, nothing.

As for the parties...I think that's really weird...I'd definitely feel uncomfortable if put in that situation.
 

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when I was a Scout the majority of the selling we did was on street corners but my parents would take me into their work and let me try to sell to co-workers, they made me make a seperate spiel for coworkers and do all the selling myself.
but in highschool when we had to sell candybars, the parents were expected to sell too, really tacky I know but what can you say for one of the last all girls catholic highschools in SF? the first two boxes you sold were considered 'parent donations' and was mandatory, I told my parents after a while that yes I would sell as many bars/boxes as I could but I didn't feel comfortable running around the office with kids half my height in MUCH cuter uniforms trying to sell the same freaking candy so what the office as a whole started doing is anything that was to be sold by anyone's spawn was to be set up in the lunch room with a picture and statement by the kid/teen telling what the sales were for and which office member was the parent. it was much better that way.

ooh I absolutly HATE those 'selling parties', I babysat for this couple once, had adorable children, at the end of the evening they gave me a choice, cash up front or the great opprotunity to invest in their business of selling really really bad health bars.
 

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Cassandra said:
ooh I absolutly HATE those 'selling parties', I babysat for this couple once, had adorable children, at the end of the evening they gave me a choice, cash up front or the great opprotunity to invest in their business of selling really really bad health bars.
You can not be serious. OMG what a way to stiff someone, how old were you when this happened? What did you do, I have to know?
btw I've never heard of these "parties". I've been invited to demonstrations before in fact last week I went to a jewelry demonstration but we all knew what it was before hand. I agree selling at the office is out of hand. I do buy occasionally from 1 or 2 of my co-workers, but these women are constantly bringing in bagels, cookies and whatnot for the office and don't expect any reimbursement for it. I guess me buying from them is my way of saying thank you.
 

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reprot said:
You can not be serious. OMG what a way to stiff someone, how old were you when this happened? What did you do, I have to know?
btw I've never heard of these "parties". I've been invited to demonstrations before in fact last week I went to a jewelry demonstration but we all knew what it was before hand. I agree selling at the office is out of hand. I do buy occasionally from 1 or 2 of my co-workers, but these women are constantly bringing in bagels, cookies and whatnot for the office and don't expect any reimbursement for it. I guess me buying from them is my way of saying thank you.
I was 14 at the time. I demanded my pay in cash or check up front, pointed out that what they were doing was a pyramid scheme and it would be fiscally smarter for me to get my $10 per kid (because they were monsters, my prices range from 5-10)per hour which came to well over $200, instead of trying to sell a bar o chemicals and sawdust to every person I saw on the street.

selling parties come in all sorts of guises, from 'tea' where the hostess actually tries to sell you tea, to your usual tupperware parties to my personal favorite 'cupcake parties' *giggle* where the hostess tries to sell *ahem* adult pleasure instruments that involve batteries
 

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Cassandra said:
ooh I absolutly HATE those 'selling parties', I babysat for this couple once, had adorable children, at the end of the evening they gave me a choice, cash up front or the great opprotunity to invest in their business of selling really really bad health bars.
How tacky!
 

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Cassandra wrote, I was 14 at the time. I demanded my pay in cash or check up front, pointed out that what they were doing was a pyramid scheme and it would be fiscally smarter for me to get my $10 per kid (because they were monsters, my prices range from 5-10)per hour which came to well over $200, instead of trying to sell a bar o chemicals and sawdust to every person I saw on the street.[/quote]

I was hoping that you asked for your cash, that took alot of guts standing up to an adult and asking for your money. Good for you
 
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