Cat Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi there, those are my cats:

1.Stewie (Male).











2.Misty (Female).









3.Both.







Questions : 1. The Guy that i got them from told me that they are Siamese, are they ?
2. They are 3 and a half months old they have there 2nd Vaccine and the vet said that they are pretty healthy in general now though they have ringworms and flu 1-2 months ago, my question is is there anything i can do to prevent that they do get sick again ?
3. when these kind of cats start breeding and is there any risks or thing i need to know before they start breeding ??

tnx in advance, and i like to hear your thinking and feelings abot them ;).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
723 Posts
First things first, they're adorable! It's hard to say without paperwork, but these two have siamese/balinese potential. He looks to be flame pointed and she looks lilac/blue pointed. I don;t think Siamese come in flame point so that might rule him out. Javanese do come in flame point. Their head shape seems to indicate tradional/applehead rather than modern/wedge head. I think it's likely that these guys has some siamese in them but are not likely purebred. That doesn't mean they aren't adorable and lovable:) At 3 1/2 months they are probalbly getting close to being able to breed. But why breed if you can't provide pedigree? It also looks like they are litter mates so breeding them would be a very bad idea.

Just one man's opinion :)
Kyle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Your kittens are mixed breed with Siamese markings. The male clearly has some Persian ancestor judging from his short nose.
As they continue to grow and thrive, they will get stronger and have less diseases. If you breed them, since neither is purebred, you will probably get a mix of kittens including the strong possibility of some long haired ones. I'm hoping you'll neuter them because we already have far too many homeless cats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
They are adorable! I love Stewie's eyes- so expressive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,661 Posts
You would be unable to call them "Siamese" as a breed. You could 'describe' them as having Siamese, or pointed, markings, but due to the flame-point and his exotic face, he should be described as "Colorpoint" instead of 'Siamese'.
I also agree about not breeding these kittens together. Stewie appears to have a strong "bow" to his hind legs, making them bowlegged; bowlegs is a major conformation defect. Responsible breeding's premise is to improve the conformation of each successive cat by breeding only the best to the best and documenting it. Responsible breeders do not begin a breeding program by breeding obvious (bowlegs) faults. Having rescued, tamed and socialized kittens for public adoption, it is people who allow their cats to breed indiscriminately that keep me busy, rescues slap-full and pounds/kill-shelters in the euth-ing business. Please spay and neuter, I would :luv LOVE :luv you for it!
BTW, Stewie looks like he wasn't too sure about walking on the grass! :lol:
heidi =^..^=
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
:p he was sure about walking on grass believe me he just been planning to strike on poor Misty shes suffering a lot from him :), and for the breeding thing i think u understand me wrong, i mean they are always together and i cant give up on 1 of them so when should i expect new kittens if any at all ?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,538 Posts
If you don't want to separate them, get them fixed on the same day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,661 Posts
DannyBoy said:
:p ... i cant give up on 1 of them so when should i expect new kittens if any at all ?
I would not breed them AT ALL and have them spayed/neutered before they reach 6mo of age.

They are not papered, registered or certified-free of any genetic issues and already exhibit obvious physical faults. Going into breeding 'blind' like it appears you are doing, is just not a good thing. A responsible breeder already *knows* what a cat's gestation would be, about what age both genders become sexually active, housing requirements for two unaltered animals of opposite genders, queening requirements and supplies and the ability to recognize the need for veterinary intervention, if necessary, and provide for it.

In addition, just because the male cat *can* breed and the female cat *does* come into season at young ages ... it does NOT mean it is okay for them to be bred at those early ages. Female cats should ideally be *at least* 18-24mo old *before* they are bred. This ensures complete development for the cat so it isn't bred too young where its' body is still trying to grow to adulthood AND grow a litter of kittens. Cats bred too young *starve* and *cannibalize* their bodies, stunting their own growth, to nurture the growing litter. In addition, the female cat's pelvis has not completed growing and birthing a litter too young can result in kits getting stuck over the pelvic arch, resulting in death (kits and queen) or emergency C-section surgery.

Finally, unless your home and property are set up as a cattery with the ability to securely keep the stud away from the queen and out of sight, sound and smell of each other during non-breeding heat cycles ... I feel it is cruel to keep them sexually entire and try to keep them apart during mating times when the female comes into season. They won't understand *why* their bodies are demanding they do the things they would be doing; calling, rolling, roaming, spraying ... they will just *do* them and be repeatedly frustrated when they cycle in and out of season and are unable to satisfy the hormones and their instinct to breed. Spaying and neutering remove those hormone cycles and their frustration-factor in addition to completely removing the possibility of specific reproductive cancers. For female cats, every heat-season they cycle through increases their odds of developing reproductive cancers.

Please reconsider breeding these kittens and have them spayed/neutered? Please?
If you are dead-set on breeding, I feel I would be remiss in advising you on an online forum and can only urge you to seek medical advise from a trusted veterinarian after they have examined both cats for reproductive health.
heidi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Your kitties are way too cute!

As for your breeding question, I agree with the other posts. But to answer your question - "What are the risks of breeding", your main risk is, a litter full of kittens that no one will want. So if you have intentions on breeding them, you'll have to be financially prepared to feed/provide vet care to an additional 5-6 cats for up to 20 years if you are unable to find homes for them.

These cats are not purebred Siamese, so no one would pay you for a kitten without purebred paperwork, when they can just get a kitten for free. Free cats are a dime a dozen, and the world is already so over populated with cats that healthy kittens are being euthanized. So breeding them, especially without a breeders license, is just pointless. Especially since they appear to be brother and sister, so you're risking birth defects.

If you were asking because you don't want the risk of her getting pregnant, cats can get pregnant as young as 5 or 6 months, depending on the cat. I got male/female kittens together, and had them fixed at 4 months to prevent the risk of her getting pregnant.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,538 Posts
There are very many risks with a cat getting pregnant at a young age.

You will need to be prepared to spend hundreds of dollars if she has complications during the pregnancy and/or birth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Your kittens are adorable! I do not think they are purebred Siamese, their faces seem far too flat (for modern or applehead). But they appear to have some similar traits, they are pointed (have colors on their faces, paws, and tails) with blue eyes, so they may have some Siamese or a similar breed in there, but without a pedigree who knows!
For comparison, this was Neko as a kitten, he's pure Siamese (applehead):


I suggest you have both cats "fixed", neuter the male and spay the female. When you go to the vet for vaccines ask when you should have the surgeries done, it should be before 6 months of age, the earlier the better since you have two intact animals living together. These surgeries remove the reproductive organs so that the cats can stay together without having kittens. If you don't do this and you keep the cats together you will have litter after litter after litter after litter for years and years. Plus if these cats are siblings you could be in for some unfortunate defects that could result in the death of the kittens or permanent health problems. Plus you have no idea what the temperament and health of their family members is like (and I don't just mean parents, it's best to be able to go back at least three generations). So if you bred them the offspring could have serious health or temperament problems (aggression, fearfulness) and that wouldn't be fair to the cats or their potential owners. Plus without knowing any of these things the kittens will be just the same as the millions of shelter cats put down each year, people could be buying them instead of your kittens, your kittens have nothing better to offer them and may end up in shelters themselves.


PLUS intact cats are really annoying. Females yowl (a lot) when in heat, some spray too. Males tend to spray all over the place and roam away to find females in heat. Also if you keep them together without fixing them Misty will likely get pregnant as a kitten, she could as early as 6 months. The pregnancy could affect her health, even course complications that kill her (because she'll be so small giving birth). Having babies is a lot of work for a female, it drains the energy out of the mother, she needs all that energy so SHE can grow, she can't afford to give any of it to a litter of kittens. Just like some humans can get pregnant at 11 years old, it doesn't mean it's good for them, safe for them, or that they are mature enough to go through that. Same goes for kittens.

Getting them fixed is an easy procedure, vets do these surgeries all the time, I really hope you will consider having it done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
829 Posts
They are very cute.
But I agree with everyone else on the spay/neutering...I had a cat who was a few years old, she got out and got pregnant. (this was LONG LONG time ago, like when I was in elementary school...) She was then kept inside. She had good feed, good care, and was fully matured. She went into labor and gave birth to one kitten, then nothing. She went in for an emergency c-section the next day. This all happened that night. Only two kittens made it, not including the one that was already born. If she would have been spayed when she was younger, she would have never had to give birth. She wouldn't have had to have a c-section. She wouldn't have had to tend those 3 babies and even though she had good feed, they still drained her. And it would have been ALOT cheaper to spay her then go through the c-section! And it's definately alot cheaper to feed the one (two in your case) cat verses the kittens that are produced plus the cat(s) that produced them.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top