Cat Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I hope someone can provide some insight for me. My girlfriend has had a cat for almost 4 years now. Her name is Kit and she was rescued as a kitten from a litter that was abandoned under an old barn. We've had her since she was rescued and she has generally been a good cat. Kit is fixed and is up to date on all shots and appears in great health. She is strictly an indoor cat.

She is litter box trianed and never urinates in the house. She does however crap in the house and it seems as though she's doing it out of spite and anger. Her litter box is immaculate, she actually has 2 of them and prefers to urinate in the uncovered box, and craps in the covered box. Her diet is consistent and she eats and drinks fine. There are 3 specific places in our apartment that she does this regularly.
1) On the floor mat in front of the main door to our apartment.
2) On the floor rug in front of the shower (she folds the carpet to hide it sometimes)
3) On the reclining chair in the computer room where I sit to play video games

It seems she mostly does this when we aren't home and particularly if in my chair when I haven't sat there in a while. She likes to sit on my lap while I play and it almost seems that she's mad at me for not sitting there and petting her. Is this possible?

Strangely Kit seems to prefer to sit with me when my girlfriend is not home or asleep. Last night we were watching TV together on the couch and Kit paced around, doing her normal grunting (kind of a mix of purr and meow) that usually means she wants some sort of attention. We picked her up onto the couch but she quickly decided that she didn't want to be with us. 10 minutes later, we discovered her angry protest on the mat in front of the door.

As crazy as it sounds, does this cat think that she is my girlfriend or something? What can I do to stop her from doing this?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,409 Posts
How long has she been pooping outside the box? The entire time you've had her or is this something new? If it's new, I recommend a vet visit. Cats usually don't start going outside their box for no reason. Typically you rule out medical reasons before addressing it as behavioral. She may be trying to tell you she has a problem.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,199 Posts
Feline behaviorists tell us that cats don't do things out of spite....don't do things to get back at us. So she'll get the proper help sooner if you reorient your thinking toward this problem. Yet if it's not a medical issue it has to be a behavioral issue. Behavioral issues are usually triggered by something. You'll have to think back and remember if there was some stressor in her environment just prior to the first incident. Even if the trigger is gone, she may continue doing it simply because it's become habitual.

Rule out the health issue first. And discuss it with your vet. Vets are supposed to be able to help out with behavioral issues as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
We humans have complex emotions and its easy for us to sometimes project them on the our feline friends. They do have their own emotions, but we have to remember that spite is not one of them. Its possible that she's learned to do it to get attention or does it out of stress (most likely), but she's not doing it to purposely make you mad or to get revenge. Once you realize this, you'll probably have better luck solving this problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I will schedule a vet visit to rule out the medical problem, although this is not new. Sometimes she's good for a couple months then she'll start doing on a daily basis. The very first time she did was when she was about a year old and we were moving. I know that can be a stressor on an animal, and she did it a couple times while we were packing our stuff.

One such event was while I was packing things from a closet. Kit kept trying to in the closet and in the middle of what I was doing and so I kept throwing her out. After going through this for a few rounds she gave up. But when I turned from the closet, there was a pile not more than 2 feet behind me.

We stayed with family for several months and she continued to do it on and off while we were there. We've been settled in for about 2 years now and are not planning a move, nor is there anything going on at home that might alert her that a move is going to happen again.

So, if it is not spite or anything like that, and I'm pretty sure it's not medical (though I'll have to verify with a vet), could she be telling us that she needs attention? Or if it is a habbit that she just developed even though the original trigger is gone, how would I go about breaking this habbit?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Covered litterboxes can trap smell - maybe she does it when you are not home because it has a chance to get dirty and smelly?

Also, she might have been trying to get your attention not to get lap time, but to let you know that she needs to go - it could be a medical issue (constipation/pooping hurts) or an environmental issue (litterbox too dirty/not enough litter, etc.)

First things first, check with the vet to rule out the obvious - constipation.
Secondly, take the cover off the litterbox and make an effort to scoop before you leave so that the box stays clean longer.
Thirdly, remove the rugs and the chair that she goes on temporarily, to see if she's attracted to the texture of those specific things, or if she's going outside the box out of desperation/lack of choice. Be sure to remove anything that's similar in texture, such as clothes on the floor, or any other rugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all of the advice. I have another question; How do you tell if a cat is constipated? Is there anyway I can tell if this is might be the problem or is this something that only a vet can determine?

Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Vets tell by palpating the abdomen, and sometimes by inserting a finger up the cats behind. You could ask the vet if it's something they can teach you to do at home.

At home, some people can tell by noticing their cat straining, digging in the litterbox, squatting, but not actually eliminating, or if their cat shows signs of stress by meowing, pacing or any other unusual behavior, like unusual interest in a rug or a quiet closet corner just before they go. Those aren't necessarily signs of constipation, but those are things that would indicate that there's a medical reason behind the problem.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top