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Discussion Starter #1
I have a pregnant cat that has been having dark brown (red tinged) discharge since last Wednesday night. She is acting normal and eating, but I am wondering what this discharge is, and I'm slightly worried.

I took her to my vet last Thursday, and the vet did an x-ray and said there is one large kitten inside, and that she should have the kitten soon. The vet did not know what the discharge was, but when I called the vet a day or two later, she said that sometimes there is discharge the week prior to birth. She took a swab and examined it under a microscope for several minutes, but then said it was inconclusive.

If anyone has experience with something like this, or knows what it is, I would appreciate some advice.

thanks
 

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Ive not known it to happen for a week.
I would go to a different vet. First of all this vet should have known better than to Xray a pregnant cat. This could damage the kitten inside.
Did the vet do tests on her? Or did the vet just presume it was this?
 

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We would normally do an ultasound scan, but we have xrayed pregnant bitches before. I have alsoi never known a discharge to last for a week - I would be worried.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. I'll bring her back to the vet. Like I said, she is acting healthy, but has the strange discharge.

Could the kitten be dead inside, or would the vet be able to tell if things inside were OK by doing an ultrasound? The vet said before that she could do a caesarean-section, but I would only want surgery as a last resort. The vet also said she could give her drugs to "make" the kitten come out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hello guys, and thank you for the advice.

Here is the bad news. Her discharge went away for a few days, but came back a couple days ago and it smells bad. I took her to the vet and asked for an ultrasound, but none of the vets at the clinic I went to knew how to use the ultrasound machine. They recommended spaying my cat and removing her uterus, but I do not want to do that at all. How serious is this infection? The cat is not acting very sick and there is not allot of discharge. The vet I went to is pushing for me to spay her, but I think that is their business, and I do not want her spayed. Is surgery needed for this, or antibiotics and maybe flushing? The vet is saying she could die if not spayed. If anyone has experience, please let me know.

I had my doctor friend do an ultrasound, but they couldn't tell anything, I guess because they are used to doing humans. If I can find a vet that knows how to use their ultrasound, will they be able to tell if the kitten(s) has/have been expelled or are still inside?
 

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Dresden said:
Hello guys, and thank you for the advice.

Here is the bad news. Her discharge went away for a few days, but came back a couple days ago and it smells bad. I took her to the vet and asked for an ultrasound, but none of the vets at the clinic I went to knew how to use the ultrasound machine. They recommended spaying my cat and removing her uterus, but I do not want to do that at all. How serious is this infection? The cat is not acting very sick and there is not allot of discharge. The vet I went to is pushing for me to spay her, but I think that is their business, and I do not want her spayed. Is surgery needed for this, or antibiotics and maybe flushing? The vet is saying she could die if not spayed. If anyone has experience, please let me know.

I had my doctor friend do an ultrasound, but they couldn't tell anything, I guess because they are used to doing humans. If I can find a vet that knows how to use their ultrasound, will they be able to tell if the kitten(s) has/have been expelled or are still inside?
Worst case scenario, it's pyometra and that can kill a cat if left untreated. It almost killed my oldest female last summer. If it's an infection your cat, at the leats, needs antibiotics. I think you're primary concern right now should be to save your cat, even though it might mean losing the kittens. I do know of pregnant females that have been treated for pyometra and given birth to perfectly healthy litters thought. In these females the antibiotics have been given in doses high enough to keep the infection under control, but low enough not to cause any damage in the kittens. But, the females have all needed an ordinary treatment with antibiotics after the kittens have been born because the treatment they got during the pregnancy wasn't good enought to kill the infection off, just to hold it back.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Sol. What was the treatment that was applied to your cat with pyometra...did she need surgery, or just antibiotics? I'm giving her antibiotics currently; as of today.
 

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The poor cat needs to be speyed. Pyometra is very quickly fatal without surgery, and its most likely that the kittens inside her are dead already, so she'll have to have surgery to remove them. Please do what's best for your cat and follow your vets advice; why don't you want her speyed after she's been through such an awful experience?
 

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Dresden said:
Thanks Sol. What was the treatment that was applied to your cat with pyometra...did she need surgery, or just antibiotics? I'm giving her antibiotics currently; as of today.
My cat had to be spayed and given antibiotics. Only antibiotics wouldn't have worked for her. One can treat with antibiotics and hormones (prostaglandin). The hormone will however kill the kittens since the hormones are used in order to get the pus out of the uterues. The kittens will follow the pus out from the uterues. :( In your case, spaying and antibiotics would be a better choice than hormones and antibiotics. Hormones are, to my knowledge, only used on females that aren't pregnant.
 

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Since she is so close to her due date, why not induce labor, hope for the best, and flush, then provide antibiotics? With the infection, if the kittens aren't already dead, they might be soon, it might be best for mom and babies as well. I know it's not the same, but with our prize winning show milk goat, she got an infection and we did just that with no side effects or reprecussions. I know that decisions like these are hard. I was about 12 when I had to decide whether or not to give a med that if this goat had eaten what we thought she had would save her life but also kill her fetuses. I chose not to medicate her and all was well. It is hard, I know. I would get multiple opinions by other vets if I were you.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the advice guys. I have to decide on something today. I just got back from another vet that took x-rays. The x-rays show one kitten inside that the vet thinks is dead, and she wants to remove the uterus due to pyometra, and she says that she has never heard of Prostaglandins. They couldn't do an ultrasound either.

If the kitten is dead, I would like to try the hormone/non-surgery method before having an invasion. It is very difficult for me since these vets do not seem to really care or know what they are doing.
 

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Dresden said:
Thanks for the advice guys. I have to decide on something today. I just got back from another vet that took x-rays. The x-rays show one kitten inside that the vet thinks is dead, and she wants to remove the uterus due to pyometra, and she says that she has never heard of Prostaglandins. They couldn't do an ultrasound either.

If the kitten is dead, I would like to try the hormone/non-surgery method before having an invasion. It is very difficult for me since these vets do not seem to really care or know what they are doing.
Few vets know of the hormone + antibiotic treatment. You canr ead about prostaglandins here: http://www.homebirth.org.uk/pe2.htm

The hormone induces labor and drives the pus out of the uterus, and of course also kittens. Hormones are usually only used if it's a closed pyometra (no discharge comes out) because the uterues might burst if the pus doesn't get out.

And do think about what Heather Sharada wrote, pyometra tends to come back if the cat is left intact. If it's a breeding queen and one choose not to spay it's recommended to breed her as soon as she gets into heat again.
 

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If the kitten is dead, she needs surgery to remove it. She will not give birth to a dead foetus. A dead kitten could be what is causing the infection in the first place, and if it is rotting inside her it will make her VERY sick. Even if the kitten is alive, a caesarian will give it a chance of life. I don't see that this is a hard decision at all. Save your cat, or don't save your cat.
 

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Why does the infection usually happen again after a first time? I just ask because I've never heard of this. We never had a problem with recurrence in these situations, at least on the farm but maybe house pets are different? Once, with a girl with a horrible infection, we had to clean her out with a hose once a day and she had absolutly no issues later after that, along with antibiotics etc. If the baby somehow died and then the infection happend, what makes you think that it will inevitably happen again? Then, if the infection happened, then the kitten died, why do you think that would happen again? Why does the vet think the kitten is dead? I think since the situation has escaladed, at least a c-section is in order like NOW. Is there no other vets willing to do an ultrasound to confirm the death of the kitten? If the vet I went to was uncaring and unknowledgable in a life or death situation like this, I would definatly find another vet ASAP for a second opinion. I'm not trying to be rude, I promise, or even try to turn this into a debate as I don't know exactly how sick the cat is, how elevated her white count is, etc. Just that if she has a nice breeding queen and there is some other way to fix this issue without endangering her further than needed, like bad odds of survival, and there is no reason to assume the infection can't be solved through any other meens, why spay her? Noone knows what the situation is exactly, and I know at least I am not a vet, though I do give shots, basic vet care, sub q fluids, and have assisted in hundreds of births, I even broke a finger once turning a breach when I miscalculated a contraction...ouch. She needs to find out all her options at a vet that cares and knows what they are talking about, am I right?
 

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BamMcg said:
Why does the infection usually happen again after a first time? I just ask because I've never heard of this. We never had a problem with recurrence in these situations, at least on the farm but maybe house pets are different? Once, with a girl with a horrible infection, we had to clean her out with a hose once a day and she had absolutly no issues later after that, along with antibiotics etc. If the baby somehow died and then the infection happend, what makes you think that it will inevitably happen again? Then, if the infection happened, then the kitten died, why do you think that would happen again? Why does the vet think the kitten is dead? I think since the situation has escaladed, at least a c-section is in order like NOW. Is there no other vets willing to do an ultrasound to confirm the death of the kitten? If the vet I went to was uncaring and unknowledgable in a life or death situation like this, I would definatly find another vet ASAP for a second opinion. I'm not trying to be rude, I promise, or even try to turn this into a debate as I don't know exactly how sick the cat is, how elevated her white count is, etc. Just that if she has a nice breeding queen and there is some other way to fix this issue without endangering her further than needed, like bad odds of survival, and there is no reason to assume the infection can't be solved through any other meens, why spay her? Noone knows what the situation is exactly, and I know at least I am not a vet, though I do give shots, basic vet care, sub q fluids, and have assisted in hundreds of births, I even broke a finger once turning a breach when I miscalculated a contraction...ouch. She needs to find out all her options at a vet that cares and knows what they are talking about, am I right?
Pyometra is likely to come back. If the infection is due to a dead foetus there's no reason to believe the infection will cause problems later on. Why pyometra tend to reoccur I don't know, but it's well known that it often reoccurs especially if it's only treated with antibiotics. The combination Baytil + Prostaglandins have shown to be a quite successful treatment of pyometra BUT still you need to breed the female again as soon as possible in order tp prevent the pyo from coming back. Some think it might be a hereditary factor involved (especially when young females are involved). An active breeding queen is quite unlikely to get pyo since she rarely have long periods between her litters. If a female has many "empty heats" she's more likely to develop pyo, the same goes for females on birth control.
 

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Aha. Then if that's the case, and her breeding queen is a nice female, she might want to number one, make sure of what caused the infection, like how long has the kitten been dead as oposed to how long the infections has been there, etc? It would also explain to me why our animals might not have had this problem, they got bred every heat. But they only go into heat once a year. See, I learn something new every day.
 

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Just because she got sick with one pregnancy doesn't mean she isn't a good canadate for the future. The stress right now doesn't mean a thing ecxept that it needs to be taken care of right now.
 
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